Friday, September 27, 2019

Student Views of Recent Events

I gave my students an assignment to write a blog post on a current event that would be of interest in a class on law and aging.  Here are two that I've received---I thought you might find them interesting.

Post #1

This was supposed to have been a fun family weekend.  My sister-in-law was headed home with a car filled with special treats and presents to celebrate my niece's sweet sixteenth birthday.  The weather was clear and traffic was moving smoothly when the crash occurred.

A ninety year old drove through a stop sign and directly into traffic, causing a multi-car accident.  My sister-in-law had to be cut from her SUV and taken to the trauma center.  I saw her crumpled vehicle first-hand, and it is an absolute wonder she survived.  It is uncertain how long her injuries will significantly impact her life.  Yet, she was the incredibly lucky one.

A young couple and their infant was also struck by the elderly driver's car.  Seeing this family's vehicle was horrific.  I knew the infant was in critical condition at the hospital.  When I saw this car, it looked as if it had been in a compactor; it didn't seem possible for anyone to survive.  Unfortunately, the infant didn't. 

As those involved in the accident struggle to heal and make sense of the tragedy, my heart goes out to the family of the elderly driver.  I have so many questions.  I wonder...did family members recognize the signs that their loved one should no longer be driving?  Did they try to intervene?  Was the driver aware of taking the wheel?  Is he aware now?  How will the driver and family cope with the legal and emotional burden of this accident?  What more can be done to prevent this kind of heartbreak?

https://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/news/multi-car-crash-injuries-four-people-including-an-infant/ar-AAHgwJn

https://seniordriving.aaa.com/resources-family-friends/conversations-about-driving/facts-research/

https://www.agingcare.com/Articles/signs-elder-unsafe-driver-153264.htm

Post #2

Elders in Politics: Perceptions of elders in the 2020 election

Brandy Orth Becker

While the perception and social utility of elders in the United States has always been a topic of discussion, throughout American history, there is a revamping of this discussion with the perspective of another elder ( 65+) as President of the United States of America.

Some common associations with the concept of getting older are memory loss, confusion, social dissonance, etc. All of these factors go to the sharpness of the mind and the ability to understand and process information. These factors are such that if relevant, any leader of a nation could be called into question.

Vice President Joe Biden has been the most clearly targeted in this 2020 election as far as ageism. Despite the fact that many who take the stage at a political debate have a tendency to jumble words, forget details, or misspeak, his errors are being connected automatically to senility and attributed to his age. After an inconsistent statement by Biden in the democratic presidential primary debate in Houston, co-candidate Julian Castro insinuated that Biden was unable to recall the statements that he had just made moments ago (See article). The internet in a quick response, picked up on the insinuations of Mr. Castro. As a result, any actual factual or political statements made by Biden in the debate were overshadowed by a discussion/parody of his age and capacity to lead as an elder.

At 72, Vice President Joe Biden is the oldest among the democratic candidates in the 2020 election. However, with his age comes a very impressive career in the political realm, making him one of the most politically experienced candidates among the bunch. It will be up to the American People in anticipation of, and at the polls, to weigh these facts, and to decide if age will in fact play a factor in disqualifying a presidential candidate.

See article: https://www.dailywire.com/news/51715/elder-abuse-julian-castro-shreds-joe-biden-over-eric-quintanar

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2019/09/student-views-of-recent-events.html

Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Discrimination, Other | Permalink

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