Friday, August 2, 2019

State Payroll Tax for Long-Term Care?

I debated a bit about the title to this post, thinking I should call it-outliving your ability to pay for long-term care. But I think the interesting point to this post is not that potential but what one state has done to fund public long-term care.  Pew Stateline ran this story, Getting Older, Going Broke: Who’s Going to Pay for Long-Term Care? Here's what is going on.

Washington state created the first public long-term care insurance plan, which will be funded through payroll taxes.

In 2017, Hawaii began providing up to $70 a day to residents who work while also taking care of elderly family members at home. Hawaii pays for the program, Kupuna Caregivers, out of its general budget.

The state estimates 154,000 residents are the unpaid caregivers of elderly family members. Kupuna Caregivers currently helps 134 Hawaiians pay for transportation, adult day care, personal care services and home-delivered meals.

Another Hawaii program, Kupuna Care, provides services to seniors in need of help with daily activities. This year, lawmakers passed a series of elder care bills, adding $11.2 million to the $9.7 million appropriated in the state’s budget.

A handful of other states, including Arizona, California, Michigan and Minnesota, also are exploring public long-term care options for people who otherwise might have to spend down their assets to qualify for Medicaid.

The article also notes that one member of the U.S. Congress has proposed a Medicare long term care benefit (would this be Part F?)

Here's a little more about the various states' actions

Minnesota is considering two private-sector options to address the problem. One would be to require insurers’ supplemental Medicare policies to include limited home chore benefits. That approach would cost beneficiaries about $8 a month... [and the] other would be to allow the sale of term life insurance policies that convert to a long-term care product once the beneficiary reaches retirement age....

In October, Michigan officials will begin studying what the state can do to help residents pay for long-term care. Illinois lawmakers this year also ordered a study to calculate how many seniors are likely to need long-term care; the possible financial impact on their families; the availability of caregivers and the tax implications of a state-run long-term care program.

The Arizona Senate passed a bill in April that would create a pilot program providing grants of up to $1,000 a year to reimburse caregivers taking care of disabled family members at home. The program would be paid for out of a $1.5 million a year fund included in the state budget....

And in California, where the population over 65 is projected to nearly double to 8.6 million in the next decade, lawmakers recently approved a $1 million study to weigh the costs of different long-term care plans.

. . .
 Washington’s new state-operated plan will pay lifetime benefits of up to $36,500 to help people pay for in-home care (provided by a professional or a family member), assisted living, or a nursing home. It will be funded through a payroll tax of 0.58% for all workers. (Self-employed people can opt in.) But the state won’t begin making payroll deductions until 2022, and benefits won’t kick in until 2025.

Not every state is on this bandwagon, however.  "Last year, Maine voters overwhelmingly rejected a ballot initiative that would have raised income taxes by 3.8% to pay for a long-term care plan." Interesting stuff.

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2019/08/state-payroll-tax-for-long-term-care.html

Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, Medicaid, Medicare, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink

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