Wednesday, December 5, 2018

Advance Directives: Counseling Guide for Lawyers

The American Bar Association Commission on Law & Aging has published the   Advance Directives: Counseling Guide for Lawyers. The website explains the usefulness of the guide: "designed to assist lawyers and health care professionals in formulating end-of-life health decision plans that are clearly written and effective... The guide provides detailed information on how to bridge the chasm between lawyers and health care providers. It helps lawyers to provide guidance that is more in harmony with the clinical and family realities that clients face. The foundation for it is a set of eight principles to guide patients and clients through the advance care planning process." The three sections include the planning principles, a checklist for attorneys, and resources.  All are available for download individually, or the entire guide may be downloaded for free or purchased from the ABA.  The guide contains a lot of helpful info for attorneys, including checklists for a first and second interview, a sample letter to the client's doctor and a HIPAA access form. Check it out! 

 

December 5, 2018 in Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Books, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Health Care/Long Term Care, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink

Tuesday, December 4, 2018

SNF Silver Tsunami Hitting Texas?

A recent article mentioned that the number of elders in Texas who will need SNF care is going to be a "silver tsunami."  The Houston Chronicle published this article, Silver Tsunami set to hit Texas nursing homes where the article acknowledges "[m]ore than 12 percent of the Texas population is over 65, and that number is growing. According to the Texas Demographic Center, the over-65 population across the state is projected to increase by more than 262 percent by 2050." But it is more than the numbers creating this "silver tsunami: the impact is magnified "by the increasingly complex medical conditions — such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s — of aging Texans needing nursing home care. According to data from the Alzheimer’s Association “2018 Texas Facts and Figures,” more than 380,000 of the state’s residents have already developed Alzheimer’s disease or other dementia. In Texas, Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death, and its prevalence is expected to increase by almost 30 percent by 2025."

The article also highlights the fact that in many instances the caregivers themselves will be elders.

We all need to be planning ahead.....

December 4, 2018 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care, Housing, State Cases, State Statutes/Regulations | Permalink

Monday, December 3, 2018

Decline in US Life Expectancy

U.S. life expectancy has declined. What's up with that? According to an article in the Washington Post, this is not good news for us. U.S. life expectancy declines again, a dismal trend not seen since World War I emphasizes the impact of the opioid and suicide crises.

The data continued the longest sustained decline in expected life span at birth in a century, an appalling performance not seen in the United States since 1915 through 1918. That four-year period included World War I and a flu pandemic that killed 675,000 people in the United States and perhaps 50 million worldwide.

The U.S. trend seems to be opposite of what is happening in other countries, and although the decline may not seem very large, it is still part of an overall concerning trend. The numbers re: opioid deaths cited in the article are shocking. Read the article to absorb the data and look at the geographical info detailing where opioid deaths are highest and lowest.  It's just not drug deaths attributing to the decline. "Other factors in the life expectancy decline include a spike in deaths from flu last winter and increases in deaths from chronic lower respiratory diseases, Alz­heimer’s disease, strokes and suicide. Deaths from heart disease, the No. 1 killer of Americans, which had been declining until 2011, continued to level off. Deaths from cancer continued their long, steady, downward trend."

December 3, 2018 in Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other, State Cases, Statistics | Permalink