Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Famous Faces of Dementia

Soon after Justice O'Connor's announcement, the New York Times ran an article, Dementia Is Getting Some Very Public Faces.

Focusing on the issue of stigma that accompanies the disease, the article notes the impact of Justice O'Connor going public about her condition.  Dementia and specifically Alzheimer's can strike any one, regardless of fame or fortune. As the article notes

Justice O’Connor had joined a growing but still tiny group: public figures who choose to share a dementia diagnosis. ...  The breakthrough came in 1994, when Ronald and Nancy Reagan released a handwritten letter disclosing his Alzheimer’s disease.

“In opening our hearts, we hope this might promote greater awareness of this condition,” the former president wrote. “Perhaps it will encourage a clearer understanding of the individuals and families who are affected by it.”

Musician Glen Campbell and his family reached a similar decision in 2011, announcing his Alzheimer’s diagnosis, and several farewell concerts, in a magazine interview. The concerts became a 15-month tour and an intimate, unflinching documentary.

The famous folks also include Pat Summit and Gene Wilder.  So what is the value of famous folks going public with their diagnosis? We already know that a large number of folks are diagnosed with dementia and that Alzheimer's disease in particular is horrible disease in my opinion.

It’s hardly an obscure condition. About 5.7 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease, the Alzheimer’s Association estimates. That represents just 60 to 80 percent of people with dementia, which takes multiple forms.

Though dementia rate seems to be declining, possibly because of rising education levels and better treatment for conditions like hypertension, both of which seem to help prevent dementia. But the number of Americans affected will continue to grow as the population grows and ages.

Already, Alzheimer’s has become the fifth leading cause of death for those aged 65 and older — and the only one for which medicine can’t yet offer prevention or treatment.

The article explains the value of famous folks going public with their diagnosis lessens the stigma others may feel from that diagnosis. Plus it may lead to earlier diagnosis for others and although there is no cure, it gives the patient and families more time to plan.

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2018/11/famous-faces-of-dementia.html

Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s, Health Care/Long Term Care | Permalink

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