Sunday, November 4, 2018

10 Commandments of Capacity

The ABA Commission on Law & Aging published its September-October newsletter, BIOFOCAL. The lead article is on  The Ten Commandments of Mental "Capacity" and the Law.

Recognizing the evolving state on the issue of capacity, the article explains 

[R]ecent changes have called the legal term “capacity” into question. The U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in Article 12 recognizes that “persons with disabilities enjoy legal capacity on an equal basis with others in all aspects of life” and that governments must take measures to assist individuals in exercising their capacity. The emerging principle of supported decision-making focuses on providing the needed support to help people make decisions. Finally, the 2017 Uniform Guardianship, Conservatorship and Other Protective Arrangements Act (UGCOPAA), approved by the Uniform Law Commission for adoption by state legislatures, does not use the term “capacity” – rather, it guides courts in determining whether there is a “basis” for the appointment of a guardian, taking into account needed supports and supported decision-making.

The article goes on to offer Ten Commandments:

1. presume capacity, 2. talk alone to the client, 3. make efforts to increase the client's abilities, 4. recognize there is no one "universal standard for assessing capacity", 5. lawyers shouldn't administer the mini-mental status exam, 6. remember it's capacity to do a specific task, 7. remember to examine the big picture, 8. keep the client's wishes, goals, etc. in the forefront, 9. remember client confidentiality and autonomy, and 10. remember the importance of advance planning.

 

 

 

 

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2018/11/10-commandments-of-capacity.html

Advance Directives/End-of-Life, Cognitive Impairment, Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Dementia/Alzheimer’s | Permalink

Comments

...and who will force jurists to consider less restrictive options or reprimand them when they don’t? Voluntary compliance for jurists is meaningless.

Posted by: Rick Black | Nov 5, 2018 5:37:40 AM

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