Friday, January 19, 2018

Intergenerational Shared Housing

We have previously blogged about the concept of shared housing. It can take many forms and can be a great option for certain elders.  The New York Times ran an article about it in NY. Getting a Roommate in Your Golden Years explains that

The concept of pairing older people with younger ones, particularly those who are not family members, is not a new one: It was popularized by Maggie Khun, an elder-rights activist who opened up her Philadelphia home to others for more than 20 years before she died in 1995. Today’s home sharing, however, is as likely to be between those of the same age as it is to be intergenerational. The crucial thing is that it involves two or more people sharing an apartment or a house to their mutual benefit. And finances often play a big role.

The article focuses on the win-win, cost savings on both sides among others. The article features one New Yorker who is running low on funds and turned to a service in Manhattan that matches folks. "The New York Foundation for Senior Citizens connected her with a licensed social worker who asked a host of questions, including details about her sleeping habits, personality, interests and daily schedule. She also had to provide three personal recommendations and her rental agreement, to prove she was on the lease. And she was asked to describe what she considered the ideal roommate. Her response: someone who wasn’t home much."

Another expert quoted in the story notes that shared housing can be a way to fight homelessness amongst elders. Don't think homelessness is an issue for elders? Think again. "Statistics show that the number of older Americans who are homeless is growing. In 2007, homeless people 62 and older who sought shelter accounted for 2.9 percent of the country’s homeless population. By 2016, the percentage had risen to 4.7, according to estimates from the National Alliance to End Homelessness, a Washington, D.C., advocacy group."

Does an elder need to go through an organization to find a roommate? No, but there are certainly advantages to doing so! For example, one elder interviewed for the story detailed her travails in finding the right match. Another expert in the article highlighted the benefits of using an agency.

She advises those interested in home sharing not to go about it on their own: Go through a nonprofit service, she said, or ask a trusted eldercare professional, friends or family to help properly vet the prospective roommates. And before you sign a lease with a boarder, make sure to do a background check... “You need a huge amount of trust and to be very clear with your expectations,” she said. . . “But if you have the help you need to stay in your home — and the tenant gains affordable housing in exchange — I think there’s much to gain socially and spiritually when young and old live together.”

 

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2018/01/intergenerational-shared-housing.html

Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Housing, Other | Permalink