Monday, January 16, 2017

Health & Safety Checks by Meals on Wheels?

So Meals on Wheels has an idea. We all know the dangers of isolation and how important it can be to check in with an elder on a regular basis.  Kaiser Health News explains the idea, Meals On Wheels Wants To Be The ‘Eyes and Ears’ For Hospitals, Doctors. "Meals on Wheels, which has served seniors for more than 60 years through a network of independent nonprofits, is trying to formalize the health and safety checks its volunteers already conduct during their daily home visits to seniors. Through an ongoing campaign dubbed “More Than a Meal,” the organization hopes to demonstrate that it can play a critical role in the health care system."

Many nonprofits face challenges, including funding challenges, and Meals on Wheels is no exception. There are competitors now,  less funding and increasing demand for services.  So how would this work?  "Meals on Wheels America and several of the local programs around the country have launched partnerships with insurers, hospitals and health systems. By reporting to providers any physical or mental changes they observe, volunteers can help improve seniors’ health and reduce unnecessary emergency room visits and nursing home placements, said Ellie Hollander, CEO of Meals on Wheels America."  It's a very cost-effective system according to the article and has the potential for bigger savings in health care costs.

There has already been some research done on the effectiveness and advantages of Meals on Wheels. Consider this:

Studies conducted by Brown University researchers have shown that meal deliveries can help elderly people stay out of nursing homes, reduce falls and save states money.

Kali Thomas, an assistant professor at Brown University School of Public Health, estimated that if all states increased the number of older people receiving the meals by 1 percent, they would save more than $100 million. Research also has shown that the daily meal deliveries helped seniors’ mental health and eased their fears of being institutionalized.

There are  projects taking place, with one between Meals on Wheels, Brown U and West Health Institute.  Another is with Meals on Wheels,  Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and Meals on Wheels of Central Maryland, which will attempt "to keep seniors at home and reduce their need for costly health services after hospitalization. The idea is to have trained volunteers report red flags and ensure, for example, that patients with congestive heart failure are weighing themselves regularly and eating properly."  The Maryland project is being run by Dr. Dan Hale (friend and former colleague at Stetson U).

Sounds like a great idea! 

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2017/01/health-safety-checks-by-meals-on-wheels.html

Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Food and Drink, Health Care/Long Term Care, Other | Permalink

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