Monday, September 7, 2015

"Safe Travels" (but, should you pass away, can I have your Frequent Flyer Miles?)

I hope everyone is lucky enough  to have a colleague such as Professor Laurel Terry here at Dickinson Law.  In addition to being the guru on regulation of lawyers, particularly for lawyers working across international borders, she's a good friend, organized, AND a guru of travel.  Whenever I have a travel question, I know she probably has sorted out the options and will have  great advice. 

So, I wasn't surprised on this holiday Labor Day weekend that she had considered "generational" travel issues, including whether you can devise or inherit "frequent flyer miles." 

Turns out you can ... depending.  Professor Terry pointed to this Smarter Travel blog, addressing which airlines have clear policies on inheritance.  You will want to look for your own favorite (least unfavored?) airline, but to summarize:  "In sum, American, Continental, and US Airways say "yes," Air Canada says "maybe," Jet Blue and United say "no way," and the others ignore the issue."

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2015/09/safe-travels-but-should-you-pass-away-can-i-have-your-frequent-flyer-miles.html

Consumer Information, Current Affairs, Estates and Trusts, International, Property Management, Travel | Permalink

Comments

I'm confused. Continental says "yes" and United says "no?" Those two airlines merged a few years back and I don't believe they have separate policies. Maybe they do.

Posted by: Laurie Anderson | Sep 7, 2015 12:14:19 PM

Good observation, Laurie. Over time, these kinds of programs can change with any airline, and certainly the trend regarding "perks" for flying is for them to be ever-more restricted. When there is a merger, for a period of time there can be two policies, eventually resolving into a single policy. Your comment is a reminder to all of us to "check with the airlines" about your specific Frequent Flyer Mile program. In the meantime, it probably doesn't hurt to include frequent flyer allocation in wills or trusts documents, recognizing that the airline contracts may restrict effectiveness of any transfer attempt. Thank you for reading and commenting on our Blog!

Posted by: Katherine Pearson | Sep 7, 2015 1:32:44 PM

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