Wednesday, October 22, 2014

The Worst Waiting List?

I've heard about the backlog for SSD appeals, but I had no idea how much of a backlog exists until I read the story in the October 19, 2014 Washington Post. Waiting on a Social Security disability appeal? Get in line — a very long line brings a new perspective on waiting lists.  The story reports that there are  990,399 (you read that right, 990,399)  SSD appeals waiting for ALJ hearings.  We have been hearing a lot about the backlog with the VA (526,000 according to the story) so why haven't we heard about the SSDI case backlog?   Want to know how long it takes for a backlog of almost one million cases to occur? According to the Post story, the backlog has been going on since President Ford's administration, but a significant increase occurred between 2008-20014.  Why did this occur?  "[T]he system became, in effect, too big to fix: Reforms were hugely expensive and so logistically complicated that they often stalled, unfinished. What’s left now is an office that costs taxpayers billions and still forces applicants to wait more than a year — often, without a paycheck — before delivering an answer about their benefits." As well, factor in the "Great Recession" and Boomers.  The article also mentions budget cuts to SSA as well as the government shutdown in 2013.

A sad irony-the story quotes one of the ALJs in S. Florida who had 2 claimants die before their appeals were heard, but the ALJ still had to hear the case of one, because if the decedent were determined to have been disabled, then the decedent's surviving child might receive benefits.

Although SSD waiting lists outnumber both VA and Patents, according to the story, the  wait time to decision is shorter than that for the VA and Patent office.  The SSA ALJs "are the moral centerpiece of this system: a symbol that the government intends to apply the old American ideal of due process before the law to the vast new caseloads of the American welfare state. They are also the system’s biggest problem — a 40-year-old clog in the pipe." A law prof at GW, Richard Pierce, takes the position "that the government should eliminate the judges altogether and just let the bureaucrats with the paperwork decide. [Professor Pierce] said that the main thing these hearings bring to the process — that face-to-face interaction between judges and applicants — often adds only pathos, not useful information."

A push to shrink the backload resulted in a drop of both cases and wait time in 2010 but a review of the decisions noted an uptick in the award of benefits.  It would seem, from reading this article, that part of the problem is outdated requirements and resources available to the judges (or lack thereof).  SSA has lessened the pressure on the ALJs to some extent, so now the ALJs are  "limited ... to 720 cases a year and [SSA] imposed new checks to make sure the “yes” decisions are as well thought-out as the 'noes.'"  The uptick in benefits awards has dropped, with the award of benefits at 44%.  Despite the fact that SSSA has hired more ALJs, the backlog is pushing one million. The Post reports that there were an additional 13,000 added in the first two weeks of October!  The story concludes by noting that the backlog isn't limited to just the ALJs.  The Appeals Council also has a backlog: "There are 150,383 people waiting for an Appeals Council decision. The average wait there is 374 days."

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/elder_law/2014/10/the-worst-waiting-list.html

Current Affairs, Federal Cases, Federal Statutes/Regulations, Social Security | Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

https://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341bfae553ef01b8d0805135970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference The Worst Waiting List?:

Comments

Post a comment