Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Is Texas Following DeVos's Lead on Privatizing Education Before She Is Even Confirmed?

The Dallas Morning News reports that top legislatures in the state a supporting an expansive new voucher program or what they call an education savings account:

Parents would get money to pull their kids from Texas public schools and educate them elsewhere, under divisive proposals that two of the state’s three top GOP leaders endorsed Tuesday.

Under a plan generating the most buzz, those families would get taxpayer dollars to spend on private schools, tutoring or related expenses through something called education savings accounts.

At a Capitol rally for “school choice” that hundreds attended, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick mentioned the accounts as one of two school voucher-type proposals he said the Senate would work on this session.

Gov. Greg Abbott, without elaborating on a particular version he wants, promised the audience at the rally he would sign a bill to “authorize school choice.” He also seemed to frown on a pilot program in specific geographic regions, speaking of a “right of every child from every ZIP code across the state” to pick a private or public school that is most suitable.
 
Some may recall that Nevada's education savings plan got struck down as an unconstitutional diversion of education funds last year.  I have no initial sense as to whether similar concerns would exist in Texas.  What I would venture to guess, however, is that like all things in Texas, this education savings plan would be big, which is why the Dallas Morning News seems so alarmed by the proposals.  The governor said he favors the “'right of every child from every ZIP code across the state' to pick a private or public school that is most suitable."
 
The news story characterizes the proposals as legislation that would pay parents to not send their kids to public school.  It uses this phrasing because the savings accounts do not have to be spent on private school tuition.  The savings account "can also be used for things like tutoring, therapists, home-schooling supplies and textbooks."  In other words, the state might actually pay a family to keep their kid at home.
 
For those interested, Hillel Levin has done some great legal analysis in this area.
 

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/education_law/2017/01/is-texas-following-devoss-lead-on-privatizing-education-before-she-is-even-confirmed.html

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