Wednesday, December 17, 2014

If Congress Ends Annual Testing, How Will Teacher Evaluation Systems Continue?

Alyson Klein, at Edweek, reports that Republicans intend to introduce a bill to reauthorize the No Child Left Behind Act early next year.  This fast track is counter to the general consensus just three months ago, which predicted reauthorization would not occur until 2016 at the earliest.

The major idea in this reauthorization is to end the federal mandate of yearly standardized testing.  Testing would fall within the discretion of states.  Some would surely keep it.  Others would drastically reduce it.  This move might split portions of the Democratic party.  Teacher Unions support the move, but civil rights advocates likely would not.  After all, civil rights groups were initially big supporters of NCLB because it would shine a light on achievement gaps.  But if Republicans are behind the bill and Democrats split, the bill stands to garner widespread support. 

Ditching annual tests, however, would create a huge practical problem for both sides.  Without those tests, the teacher accountability systems that have swept the nation, and are a signature piece of NCLB waivers, will not work.  Republicans, education reformers, and anti-labor forces have been staunch supporters of these systems.  The administration believes these systems can transform the teaching profession.  Surely Secretary Duncan and the President recognize this.  Do any of the bill's drafters?  Probably so, which begs the question of whether passing this bill in the House and Senate is posturing, short-term thinking, an over-reaction to NCLB waivers, or well-intended policy.

 

 

 

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/education_law/2014/12/if-congress-ends-annual-testing-how-will-teacher-evaluation-systems-continue.html

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