CrimProf Blog

Editor: Kevin Cole
Univ. of San Diego School of Law

Wednesday, April 15, 2020

Hessick & Morse on Picking Prosecutors

Carissa Byrne Hessick and Michael Morse (University of North Carolina School of Law and Harvard University - Department of Government) have posted Picking Prosecutors (Iowa Law Review, Vol. 105, No. 4, 2020, Forthcoming) on SSRN. Here is the abstract:
 
The conventional academic wisdom is that elections for local prosecutor are little more than empty exercises. Using the results of a new, national survey of local prosecutor elections––the first of its kind––this Article offers a more complete account of the legal and empirical landscape. It confirms that incumbent prosecutors rarely face challengers and almost always win. But it moves beyond extant work to consider the nature of local political conflict, including how often local prosecutors face a contested election or any degree of competition. It also demonstrates a significant difference in the degree of incumbent entrenchment based on time in office. Most importantly, it reveals a stark divide between rural and urban prosecution. Urban areas are more likely to hold a contested election than rural areas. Rural areas, in which very few lawyers live, rarely hold contested elections and sometimes are not able to field even a single candidate for a prosecutor election. The results suggest that the nascent movement to use prosecutor elections as a source of criminal justice reform may have success, at least in the short term. But elections are, as of now, not a likely source of reform in rural areas—the very areas where incarceration rates continue to rise.

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/crimprof_blog/2020/04/hessick-morse-on-picking-prosecutors.html

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