ContractsProf Blog

Editor: Myanna Dellinger
University of South Dakota School of Law

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Passport Issuance Not a Contractual Activity

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals has held that a nation state issuing a passport to one of its citizens cannot be sued for breach of contracts or a tort, for that matter.

Chinyere Nwoke sued the a consulate of Nigeria after paying $500 for passports for her and her son that she never received.  Arguing breach of contract, the district court dismissed her claim under the Foreign Services Immunity Act.  On appeal, Ms. Nwoke invoked the exception for acts “based upon a commercial activity.”  Unknown

A foreign state is immune for federal jurisdiction for its “sovereign or public acts,” but not its acts that are “private or commercial in nature.”  Ms. Nwoke argued that the consulate’s actions were commercial because it was “making a profit from a fraudulent activity” (presumably charging for passports never actually issued).  However, courts do not consider a nation state’s motivation in determining whether an activity is sovereign or commercial.  Because private persons cannot issue passports, the consulate’s activities were of a sovereign nature and immunity thus applied.

This case makes sense, but is of course nonetheless unfortunate for Ms. Nwoke, whose only channel of complaint now seems to be to the government of Nigeria; a case of complaining to the very wrongdoer that oversaw the wrong. Government corruption remains a serious issue around the world.  

The case is Nwoke v. Consulate of Nigeria, 2018 WL 3216888

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/contractsprof_blog/2018/07/passport-issuance-not-a-contractual-activity.html

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