ContractsProf Blog

Editor: Myanna Dellinger
University of South Dakota School of Law

Monday, July 2, 2018

An "exceedingly rare" case where a court discounted testimony, relying in part on the witness's admitted "habit of routinely lying" in the course of business

A recent case out of Michigan, Strategy and Execution Inc. v. LXR Biotech LLC, No. 337105, speaks to the perils of not putting agreements in writing (or doing so and subsequently losing the writing). The parties had a written contract that stated that they would arrive at performance criteria at a later time. But the parties disputed ever entering into a later agreement over the performance criteria. No party produced any written document. LXR's principal testified that the parties reached an oral agreement that he memorialized in writing but the writing was later lost. However, this testimony was not corroborated by any other witness except for one who gave "conflicting testimony" regarding the document. LXR's principal had admitted to "routinely lying" because he apparently thought it to be "good business practice." Furthermore, none of the "voluminous" emails exchanged between the parties ever referenced any agreement on the performance criteria. The court therefore agreed that "this is one of the exceedingly rare cases in which a witness's testimony is insufficient to find a jury question." Despite the testimony, the court was permitted to enter a directed verdict on the breach of contract claim. 

Written contracts are not always required, but this case is an example of why they are often desirable to have, and to keep safe!

(There were other points of appeal in the case relating to other clauses of  the contract and some jury instruction issues.)

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/contractsprof_blog/2018/07/an-exceedingly-rare-case-where-a-court-discounted-testimony-relying-in-part-on-the-witnesss-admitted.html

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