ContractsProf Blog

Editor: Jeremy Telman
Valparaiso University Law School

Monday, December 18, 2017

Facebook's terms of use have gaps that leave consumers powerless

Venkat Balasubramani over on Technology and Marketing Law Blog has a piece on the defeat of a recent lawsuit against Facebook based on Facebook's tracking of logged-out users on third-party websites. The court had previously rejected other claims, which left only contract-based claims, which the court also rejected in this most recent ruling. Basically, Facebook's statements about not tracking logged out users could not be found in the terms of service. Instead, Facebook made them in other documents, like data use policies and help center pages. Therefore, the court found there was no contractual provision governing Facebook's behavior. 

As the blog notes, "Ouch." It takes the court a long time to wade through Facebook's voluminous documents to determine what is and is not a contractual promise, an act that we surely can't expect the typical consumer (even if a lawyer) to engage in. This ruling seems to allow Facebook to be a little bit coy about where it makes its statements in order to avoid certain claims. The gap on tracking logged-out users in the terms of use seems to leave consumers without a cause of action here, and to make it difficult for consumers to piece together all of the documents to determine Facebook's true stance on the issue. 

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/contractsprof_blog/2017/12/facebooks-terms-of-use-have-gaps-that-leave-consumers-powerless.html

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