ContractsProf Blog

Editor: Myanna Dellinger
University of South Dakota School of Law

Saturday, November 21, 2015

Consent Agreement on Embryo Destruction a Legally Binding Contract

A California Superior Court Judge has ruled that a consent agreement between spouses about what to do with frozen embryos in case of divorce has the effect of a legally binding contract. This was the first such ruling in California. The case is In re the Marriage of Stephen E. Findley and Mimi C. Lee.

Shortly before Dr. Lee and Mr. Findley were married in 2010, Dr. Lee discovered that she had cancer. The couple decided to create and store embryos to preserve their chances of having a child. Shortly after the marriage, the couple signed a consent decree stating that the embryos were to be destroyed if the couple divorced. They marriage went downhill and ended in an acrimonious divorce in 2015.

Dr. Lee, however, argued for her right to keep the embryos. She argued that because of her age – she is 46 – the embryos are her only chance of having a child on her own. She testified that she considered the fertility clinic agreement a mere consent form and that she thought she could change her mind about it later on.

Judge Anne-Christine Massullo found that a consent agreement is a legally binding contract. It must be upheld in order to render certainty to IVF clinics and individuals who undergo IVT treatment regarding their dispositional choices before embryos are created. Said the judge about holding IVT agreements to be mere contracts: “It is a disturbing consequence of modern biological technology that the fate of … embryos … must be determined in a court by reference to cold legal principles.” That may be a valid concern, but equally important is, undoubtedly, the rights and concerns of both marital parties.

Consider this as well: Dr. Lee had offered her ex-husband to waive child support if he would let her use the embryos. However, such a promise is meaningless in California where such an agreement cannot be enforced. In contrast, Mr. Findley testified that Dr. Lee had once asked him “how much money the embryos were worth to him” and indicated that she could turn a possible child against him in the future. The court found “well founded” Mr. Findley’s belief that Lee would use any child born of the embryos as a money extortion device. Said the judge: “Mr. Findley should be free from court compelled fatherhood and the uncertainties it would bring.”

In this case, these included potential extortion by a highly educated woman – an anesthesiologist - who seems able consider her potential children to be not only objects of affection, but also vehicles for a monetary reward. Mr. Findley testified that he would like to have children some day, just not with Dr. Lee. Wise decision, it seems, and one that the court equally wisely supported, even though it had to resort to “cold legal principles.”

11/21/2015

Consent Agreement on Embryo Destruction a Legally Binding Contract

A California Superior Court Judge has ruled that a consent agreement between spouses about what to do with frozen embryos in case of divorce has the effect of a legally binding contract. This was the first such ruling in California. The case is In re the Marriage of Stephen E. Findley and Mimi C. Lee, Case No. FDI-13-780539, http://www.sfsuperiorcourt.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/FINDLEY_Statement_Of_Decision%20Rev_1.pdf

Shortly before Dr. Lee and Mr. Findley were married in 2010, Dr. Lee discovered that she had cancer. The couple decided to create and store embryos to preserve their chances of having a child. Shortly after the marriage, the couple signed a consent decree stating that the embryos were to be destroyed if the couple divorced. They marriage went downhill and ended in an acrimonious divorce in 2015.

Dr. Lee, however, argued for her right to keep the embryos. She argued that because of her age – she is 46 – the embryos are her only chance of having a child on her own. She testified that she considered the fertility clinic agreement a mere consent form and that she thought she could change her mind about it later on.

Judge Anne-Christine Massullo found that a consent agreement is a legally binding contract. It must be upheld in order to render certainty to IVF clinics and individuals who undergo IVT treatment regarding their dispositional choices before embryos are created. Said the judge about holding IVT agreements to be mere contracts: “It is a disturbing consequence of modern biological technology that the fate of … embryos … must be determined in a court by reference to cold legal principles.” That may be a valid concern, but equally important is, undoubtedly, the rights and concerns of both marital parties.

Consider this as well: Dr. Lee had offered her ex-husband to waive child support if he would let her use the embryos. However, such a promise is meaningless in California where such an agreement cannot be enforced. In contrast, Mr. Findley testified that Dr. Lee had once asked him “how much money the embryos were worth to him” and indicated that she could turn a possible child against him in the future. The court found “well founded” Mr. Findley’s belief that Lee would use any child born of the embryos as a money extortion device. Said the judge: “Mr. Findley should be free from court compelled fatherhood and the uncertainties it would bring.”

In this case, these included potential extortion by a highly educated woman – an anesthesiologist - who seems able consider her potential children to be not only objects of affection, but also vehicles for a monetary reward. Mr. Findley testified that he would like to have children some day, just not with Dr. Lee. Wise decision, it seems, and one that the court equally wisely supported, even though it had to resort to “cold legal principles.”

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/contractsprof_blog/2015/11/consent-agreement-on-embryo-destruction-a-legally-binding-contract.html

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