Friday, March 13, 2015

This Week in the Immigration Suit

Schwinn-steven
Steven D. Schwinn, John Marshall Law School

Earlier this week, Judge Hanen deferred a ruling on DOJ's motion to stay his nationwide injunction against DAPA until after March 19. He'll hold a hearing then on DOJ's Advisory (filed March 3) that the government granted about 100,000 deferred action applications (filed under the original 2012 DACA guidelines) for 3 years between November 24, 2014, and the court's order--and whether DOJ previously misled the court in representing that it wouldn't grant new deferrals under the new and expanded DACA guidelines during this period. It seems now even less likely (if that's possible) that Judge Hanen will grant DOJ's motion for a stay.

Then yesterday DOJ filed an Emergency Motion for Stay Pending Appeal, asking the Fifth Circuit to stay Judge Hanen's injunction nationwide, or, if not, at least limit it to Texas or the plaintiff states. DOJ argued that Judge Hanen's ruling is wrong, because it allows a single state to "override the United States' exercise of its enforcement discretion in the immigration laws." DOJ also addressed standing, and the underlying APA claim. DOJ wrote:

The court invented a novel theory of Article III standing that purports to confer standing on States without any actual injury. In the alternative, the court purported to find a cognizable injury to Texas based on indirect economic costs that are not the subject of these policies, that federal law does not obligate Texas to bear, and in disregard of the expected economic benefits of these same policies--a standing theory that would radically expand the ability of States to intrude into this uniquely federal domain.

On the merits, the district court erred in holding that DHS violated the notice and comment requirement of the APA.

DOJ also asked for expedited briefing (7 days for the plaintiffs to respond) and decision (14 days).

Fourteen states and the District of Columbia filed an amicus in support of the United States.

Then today the Fifth Circuit directed the plaintiffs that they have until March 23 to respond to DOJ's motion for a stay and for expedited appeal. (March 23 is obviously beyond the 7-day response time requested by DOJ. But the court's order specifically leaves on the table DOJ's "motion to expedite the appeal.")

The Fifth Circuit's order today doesn't say anything about the merits. But it may give a clue as to how the conservative court will view the case.

The upshot is that no stay is immediately on the horizon. The next move appears to be Judge Hanen's, at the hearing on March 19.

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/conlaw/2015/03/this-week-in-the-immigration-suit.html

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Comments

The Department of Justice seems to be "taking it on the nose" for failing to properly advise courts. See generally, http://licensedtolie.com.

Posted by: Tom N. | Mar 14, 2015 1:20:02 PM

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