Monday, February 25, 2019

Call for Papers: ABA Journal of Affordable Housing & Community Development Law

ABA Journal of Affordable Housing & Community Development Law

 

Call for Papers

 

The State of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit Program:

What’s Working, Problems, Solutions and Visions for the Future

 

Drafts due May 1, 2019

 

The Journal of Affordable Housing & Community Development Law (the Journal) invites articles and essays on the theme of the state of Low Income Housing Tax Credit program. What’s working? What are important problems/issues and proposed solutions? What are visions for the future? The Journal welcomes essays (typically 2,500–6,200 words) or articles (typically 7,000-10,000 words). 

 

In addition, the Journal welcomes articles and essays on any of the Journal’s traditional subjects: affordable housing, fair housing and community/economic development. Topics could include important developments in the field; federal, state, local and/or private funding sources; statutes, policies or regulations; and empirical studies.

 

The Journal is the nation’s only law journal dedicated to affordable housing and community development law.  The Journal educates readers and provides a forum for discussion and resolution of problems in these fields by publishing articles from distinguished law professors, policy advocates and practitioners.

 

Interested authors are encouraged to send an abstract describing their proposals. Submissions of final articles and essays are due by May 1, 2019. Please email abstracts and final drafts to the Journal’s Editor-in-Chief, Tim Iglesias, at iglesias@usfca.edu. The Journal also accepts submissions on a rolling basis. Please do not hesitate to contact the Editor with any questions.

 

February 25, 2019 | Permalink | Comments (0)

JOBS: Pepperdine's Geoffrey H. Palmer Endowed Distinguished Practitioner in Residence

Pepperdine University School of Law is seeking candidates for the Geoffrey H. Palmer endowed distinguished practitioner in residence in real estate law, with teaching responsibilities in real estate finance, real estate transactions, and property law. The successful candidate is expected to contribute to the leadership of the Geoffrey H. Palmer Center for Entrepreneurship and the Law. Ideal candidates will have extensive experience in the practice of real estate law, especially in the California real estate market. Applicants with relevant publications in academic or practice journals are particularly encouraged to apply.

The Palmer Center for Entrepreneurship and the Law is an innovative program designed to prepare students for both the challenges and opportunities high technology is presenting in areas such as business, real estate, entertainment law, securities regulation, and intellectual property rights. Students become fellows of the Center each year, participating in externships, special symposia, and a rigorous curriculum.

The School of Law is an ABA-accredited, AALS member law school located in Malibu, California. Pepperdine is a Christian university committed to the highest standards of academic excellence and Christian values, where students are strengthened for lives of purpose, service, and leadership. The School of Law welcomes applications from people of all faiths and is particularly interested in receiving applications from candidates who may bring greater racial, ethnic, and gender diversity to the faculty of the School of Law. Pepperdine University is an equal opportunity employer.

Please download and complete the application, and send to lawfacapps@pepperdine.edu.

For further information about Pepperdine University and the School of Law, please contact Derek Muller at derek.muller@pepperdine.edu, or visit the law school's website: law.pepperdine.edu. The deadline for submission is March 8, 2019.

February 25, 2019 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, February 15, 2019

What's in a Name? Teaching Implicit Bias

Over on the Best Practices in Legal Education blog, I shared my thoughts on teaching implicit bias: 

Every semester I weave into my classrooms several opportunities to teach about implicit bias. I have shown videos like this and led discussions on articles like this.

Last week in my Family Law Clinic seminar, we discussed Peggy McIntosh’s Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack, which describes the author’s quest to overcome her biases stemming from white privilege. A student shared their pain and frustration over college and law professors never using their full name, and often mispronouncing the parts of their name the professor is willing to speak out loud. “It’s dehumanizing,” my student said.

Those words have haunted me all week. Names are fundamental parts of human identity. Why can we, as educators–members of an elite profession–not get this right? Why is it not a norm in higher education for professors and teaching assistants to learn to pronounce every student’s name?

Also this week, I read in a memo from a colleague a to-do item along the lines of “practice pronouncing graduates’ names.” The colleague was sharing with me tips for the job I will soon begin: associate dean for academic affairs. One privilege of this job is reading the names of all Penn State Law graduates at the annual commencement ceremony. It was profoundly touching to learn that my colleague takes the time to practice every graduate’s name–and they felt it important enough to share with me as one of a handful of their significant monthly action items.

I give all my students the opportunity to share the pronunciation of their name with me on the first day of class, on note cards I keep with me at every class. An earlier post explained more about the note card system, which I learned from fellow blogger Paula Schaefer. Pronouncing each student’s name is challenging, and I sometimes falter. Last semester I began writing the pronunciations on my seating chart, to minimize my fumbling through the note cards. This is my seventeenth year of teaching. My only regret is not starting this earlier. It enriches my classroom, and it enriches me. It bakes into my pedagogy an indirect lesson about implicit bias, a lesson I re-learn every time I call on a student and say their name, whether it is Ainslie or Zhao-Ji.

February 15, 2019 | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, February 9, 2019

JOBS: Low Income Taxpayer Clinic at South Dakota

Via Dean Tiffany Graham:

Low Income Tax Clinic Director, Lecturer

The University of South Dakota School of Law invites applications for the position of Low Income Taxpayer Clinic (LITC) Director, to begin in July 2019. The position is non-tenure track and paid out of a federal grant. Continued employment is contingent on the availability of grant funding. The grant period ends on December 31, 2019, but is expected to be renewed. Applicants may be eligible for a Lecturer or Senior Lecturer position, dependent upon qualifications.

The Director will lead the only LITC in the Dakotas. Responsibilities will include representing low-income taxpayers before the IRS and the U.S. Tax Court, teaching and supervising clinical law students in the representation of clients, engaging in outreach to South Dakota and North Dakota communities, developing and coordinating a panel of pro bono attorneys, managing the LITC’s docket, and ensuring compliance with the requirements of an IRS-funded LITC.

Teaching experience at an ABA law school and/or experience with an LITC are highly preferred qualifications.

The successful candidate must be a licensed attorney in a United States jurisdiction (a state or the District of Columbia) by the time of the appointment.

The University of South Dakota embraces and practices the values of diversity and inclusiveness. Candidates who support these values are encouraged to apply. EEO/AA

Applications must be submitted through the Board of Regents electronic employment site: https://yourfuture.sdbor.edu/. For application assistance or accommodation, call 605-677-5671. Please include your application letter, vita, and the names and addresses of three current references.

Inquiries may be directed to Ramon Ortiz, Director of Experiential Learning, University of South Dakota School of Law, 414 E Clark Street, Vermillion, SD 57069; e-mail Ramon.Ortiz@usd.edu; telephone 605-658-3528.

 

 

 

February 9, 2019 | Permalink | Comments (0)