Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Virtual Event: Unpacking Iqbal (April 15, 2021)

Below are the details for Unpacking Iqbal, which will be co-hosted by the Chicago-Kent MLSA with the MLSA at UIUC and Georgetown:

When: Apr 15 (Thu), 6:00 PM - 7:15 PM CDT

Where: Zoom, register here: https://lu.ma/qgugl5o3   

Ashcroft v. Iqbal is known as the seminal case that every 1L agonizes over because it transformed the pleading standard starting in 2008. But this case goes beyond pleading standards. It is intertwined with questions surrounding qualified immunity, Xenophobia, Islamophobia and carries a holding that eerily resembles a rationale for blatant racism and discrimination. We have invited panel speakers Professor Alexander Reinert (who argued the case in front of the Supreme Court) and Professor Shirin Sinnar to discuss the impact that Iqbal has had on the entire American litigation system for ethnic and racial minorities.

 

Unpacking Iqbal

 

H/T: Greg Reilly

 

 

 

 

 

April 14, 2021 in Conferences/Symposia, Twombly/Iqbal | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, April 6, 2021

Stetson Law Review Virtual Symposium: "Civil Procedure Transformation After Fifteen Years of the Roberts Court" (April 9, 2021)

Here is the announcement and registration details:

Stetson Law Review is pleased to announce its Spring 2021 Virtual Symposium: Civil Procedure Transformation After Fifteen Years of the Roberts Court.  The Symposium will be held virtually on Friday, April 9 from 1-4:30 p.m. Panels will discuss the Roberts Court’s transformative influence on personal jurisdiction doctrine, court access and choice, as well as the adjudication process. More information on the panels and panelists can be found at https://www2.stetson.edu/law-review/symposia/.

The event will be held over Zoom. If you would like to attend, please email lrmarked@law.stetson.edu or register directly at https://lnkd.in/eggmuJM.

 

 

 

April 6, 2021 in Conferences/Symposia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, March 24, 2021

Emory & Oxford Zoom Series: "Quo Vadis civil justice? Filling the gaps in civil justice in the U.S. and Europe" (March 26, April 30, May 28)

Here is the announcement (H/T Rich Freer):

Emory University School of Law and The University of Oxford’s Center for Socio-Legal Studies Swiss Re Programme for Civil Justice Systems are hosting a three-part Zoom event titled, Quo Vadis civil justice? Filling the gaps in civil justice in the U.S. and Europe. The first event is this Friday, March 26, from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon Eastern Daylight Time. The others will follow, respectively, in April and May. The link to register for Friday’s event is below.

The ‘Filling the Gaps’ series will gather lawmakers, policymakers, scholars, business representatives and legal practitioners who will offer insights into the seismic shift the contemporary civil justice systems in Europe and the U.S. are experiencing. They will reflect on the search for just, efficient, and effective civil justice mechanisms, trace the trajectories of reforms, assess the reasons for differences in trajectories, and attempt to answer the perennial question: can we learn from one another?

Panels

Panel 1: Current Trends in Civil Litigation

March 26, 2021 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon (EDT)

The panel discussion explores developments in civil litigation. The recent trends in civil litigation in the U.S. have been the subject of some concern in academia and legal practice. The civil process and courthouses are affected by the growing pressures towards better case management and the omnipresent goal of efficiency. Some key elements of the ‘American procedural exceptionalism’ lost a great deal of their potency. European civil justice policy, while also under pressure from the efficiency advocates, continues to focus on encouraging more litigation. Reforms across Europe reflect movements towards some elements of the American-style (or common law-style) litigation. European lawmakers are looking into, or have already established, new mechanisms encouraging litigation, both on an individual and collective basis.

Speakers

Mary Anne Bobinski (Dean of Emory School of Law)
Christopher Hodges (University of Oxford)
Magdalena Tulibacka (Emory Law)
Sean Farhang (Berkeley Law, University of California)
Richard Freer (Emory Law)
Xandra Kramer (Erasmus School of Law, Rotterrdam)
Malgorzata Posnow-Wurm (European Commission)
John Sorabji (University College London Faculty of Law)
Stefaan Voet (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)

To register, please click here.

Continue reading

March 24, 2021 in Conferences/Symposia, International/Comparative Law | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, March 15, 2021

Emory Law Conference on Federal Diversity Jurisdiction (Friday, March 19)

Emory Law School’s Center on Federalism and Intersystemic Governance is hosting a conference on federal diversity jurisdiction this Friday, March 19 (11:20am – 5:40pm Eastern Time).

Here’s the link to register: https://emorylaw.wufoo.com/forms/conference-on-federal-diversity-jurisdiction/

(H/T: Jonathan Nash)

March 15, 2021 in Conferences/Symposia, Federal Courts, Subject Matter Jurisdiction | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, March 11, 2021

Private Enforcement & Environmental Law: Civil Society Organizations, Public Interests, and Accountability (Online Workshop, Friday 3/12/2021)

Cornell University’s Department of Natural Resources and Environment and the University of Chicago Law School are hosting an online workshop tomorrow (Friday 3/12, 8:15 am – 2:45 pm EST), Private Enforcement & Environmental Law: Civil Society Organizations, Public Interests, and Accountability.

Here’s the registration link: https://cornell.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_5bIbkK03QyCy2u_mZge5yQ

More details on this flyer:

Download AD - Private Enforcement Workshop March 12 2021

(H/T: Zach Clopton)

 

 

 

 

March 11, 2021 in Conferences/Symposia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, March 5, 2021

Today: Alabama Law Review Virtual Symposium, Ten Years of the Supreme Court's Personal Jurisdiction Revival

It’s not too late to register for the Alabama Law Review’s virtual symposium (via Zoom), Ten Years of the Supreme Court’s Personal Jurisdiction Revival. The program will run from 9:00am–3:30pm central time. You can register here.

Hope to see you all soon!

 

 

March 5, 2021 in Conferences/Symposia, Supreme Court Cases | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, March 1, 2021

Unavailability Civil Procedure Workshop Resumes Tuesday, March 2

The Spring 2021 Unavailability Civil Procedure Workshop resumes this Tuesday, March 2, at 3:00pm ET / 2:00pm CT / 1:00pm MT / 12:00pm PT. Beth Burch will discuss Multi-District Litigation.

Hope to see folks there!

 

 

 

March 1, 2021 in Conferences/Symposia, Mass Torts, MDLs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, February 26, 2021

Alabama Law Review Virtual Symposium (Friday, March 5): Ten Years of the Supreme Court's Personal Jurisdiction Revival

Next Friday, March 5, the Alabama Law Review will be hosting a virtual symposium (via Zoom) entitled Ten Years of the Supreme Court’s Personal Jurisdiction Revival. The program will run from 9:00am–3:30pm central time. You can register here if you would like to attend. Here is the announcement:

Personal jurisdiction—a court’s power to make binding judgments regarding the parties or property involved in a lawsuit—is a threshold issue in every civil action. It is also a matter of constitutional due process in which the Supreme Court, at various points in its history, has been deeply involved. However, for more than twenty years during the 1990s and 2000s, the Court remained silent—even as the nature of civil litigation, commerce, and society itself changed dramatically. That silence ended in 2011, with Goodyear and McIntyre, commencing a significant period of renewed interest by the Court. Ten years later, judges, lawyers, and legal scholars alike are continuing to analyze and debate the ramifications of these decisions.

On Friday, March 5, the Alabama Law Review will host a virtual symposium from 9:00 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. CST. The symposium, entitled Ten Years of the Supreme Court’s Personal Jurisdiction Revival, will explore the Court’s recent decisions and the questions they raise going forward. The symposium will feature renowned scholars, including a keynote address by Arthur Miller of New York University School of Law, and experienced practitioners, including Sean Marotta and Deepak Gupta, who argued the Ford cases—the Supreme Court’s latest foray into personal jurisdiction—this Term.

Other speakers include Robin Effron, Rich Freer, Maggie Gardner, Alexandra Lahav, Alan Morrison, Larry Solum & Max Crema, and Ben Spencer, as well as Alabama litigators Greg Cook, Diandra “Fu” Debrosse, Kim Martin, and Dave Wirtes.

Hope everyone can join us. It should be a fun, stimulating event. And maybe the Supreme Court itself will add to the excitement by handing down its decision in Ford next week too! (Can’t make any promises on that, though.) 

 

 

 

 

 

February 26, 2021 in Conferences/Symposia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, February 16, 2021

Legal Tech and the Future of Civil Justice

Stanford Law School is hosting a four-session virtual conference entitled Legal Tech and the Future of Civil Justice. The second installment happens tomorrow (February 17) at 9:00am PST. More details and registration info here.

(H/T David Engstrom)

 

 

February 16, 2021 in Conferences/Symposia, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, February 3, 2021

Festschrift for Steve Burbank (Feb. 12 & 13, 2021): Civil Procedure, Judicial Administration, and the Future of the Field

The University of Pennsylvania Law Review and the Journal of Constitutional Law are hosting a Festschrift in Honor of Steve Burbank entitled Civil Procedure, Judicial Administration, and the Future of the Field. It will be held virtually on Friday, February 12 and Saturday, February 13.

Details are on the following flyer:

Download Law Review Symposium 2021

You can register here.

(H/T: Tobias Wolff & Andrew Bradt)

 

 

February 3, 2021 in Conferences/Symposia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, February 1, 2021

Spring 2021 Unavailability Civil Procedure Workshops

With the new year comes three new monthly installments of the Unavailability Civil Procedure Workshop. This semester, they’re happening on the first Tuesday of the month at 3:00pm ET / 2:00pm CT / 1:00pm MT / 12:00pm PT. Here’s the lineup, which starts tomorrow:  

February 2, 2021: Pamela Bookman & David Noll -- Ad Hoc Procedure

March 2, 2021: Beth Burch -- Multi-District Litigation

April 6, 2021: David Engstrom & Jonah Gelbach -- Legal Tech

May 4, 2021: Open Discussion --- Ford Motor Co. v. Montana Eighth Judicial Dist. Ct.

 

 

 

 

February 1, 2021 in Conferences/Symposia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, January 29, 2021

Call for Submissions: SEALS Works-In-Progress Series

Below is the call for submissions for the Southeastern Association of Law Schools Works-In-Progress series, which will occur at the 2021 SEALS Annual Conference (July 26 - August 1, Amelia Island, Florida).

The deadline to submit an abstract is February 5, 2021.

Download 2021 Works-in-Progress Letter (Second Revision)

(H/T: Lou Virelli)

 

 

 

 

 

January 29, 2021 in Conferences/Symposia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, December 23, 2020

2021 AALS Annual Meeting (January 5-9, 2021)

It’s going to be an unusual, entirely virtual 2021 annual meeting for the Association of American Law Schools. Here’s the full program, and here’s a list of panels that may be of particular interest (all times are eastern)…

Continue reading

December 23, 2020 in Conferences/Symposia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, December 21, 2020

Dangerous Secrets: Confronting Confidentiality in Our Public Courts

The Pound Civil Justice Institute has published the report of its 2020 Judges Forum, Dangerous Secrets: Confronting Confidentiality in Our Public Courts. It features academic papers by Dustin Benham and Sergio Campos, plus commentary and discussion by the legal experts and judges who attended.

You can find previous Judges Forum reports here.

 

 

 

December 21, 2020 in Conferences/Symposia, Discovery, Recent Scholarship, State Courts | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, November 9, 2020

Spring 2021 Unavailability Civil Procedure Workshops

The Unavailability Civil Procedure Workshop has its final fall session tomorrow (Tuesday, November 10). We’ll resume again in Spring 2021 with the following workshops:

February 2, 2021: Pamela Bookman & David Noll -- Ad Hoc Procedure

March 2, 2021: Beth Burch -- Multi-District Litigation

April 6, 2021: David Engstrom & Jonah Gelbach -- Legal Tech

 

 

 

November 9, 2020 in Conferences/Symposia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, October 12, 2020

Next Session of SALT's Virtual Series, "Social Justice in Action"

We covered earlier the new virtual series Social Justice in Action, brought to you by the Society of American Law Teachers (SALT). Here are details on the next session:

Anti-Racist Hiring Practices
–  October 16, 2020 3pm ET - 4pm ET –
Register here:  https://bit.ly/307SZ6M

Featuring
Tamara Lawson, Dean, St. Thomas University School of Law
Angela Onwuachi-Willig, Dean, Boston University School of Law
Sean Scott, President and Dean, California Western School of Law

(H/T: Allyson Gold)

 

 

 

October 12, 2020 in Conferences/Symposia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 29, 2020

Steinman on Appellate Courts and Civil Juries

I posted on SSRN a draft of my article, Appellate Courts and Civil Juries. Here’s the abstract:

In federal civil litigation, decisionmaking power is shared by juries, trial courts, and appellate courts. This article examines an unresolved tension in the different doctrines that allocate authority among these institutions, which has led to confusion regarding the relationship between appellate courts and civil juries. At base, the current uncertainty stems from a longstanding lack of clarity regarding the distinction between matters of law and matters of fact. The high-stakes Oracle-Google litigation—which is now before the Supreme Court—exemplifies this. In that case, the Federal Circuit reasoned that an appellate court may assert de novo review over a jury's verdict simply by characterizing a particular issue as legal rather than factual. But this approach misperceives the approach demanded by Rule 50 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, which permits judicial override of a jury's verdict only when "a reasonable jury would not have a legally sufficient evidentiary basis" to reach such a verdict.

Rule 50's reasonable-jury standard does not permit de novo review of a jury's verdict on a particular issue. Rather, it requires deference to the jury's conclusion on that issue unless the reviewing court can explain why principles of substantive law or other aspects of the trial record render that verdict unreasonable. This deferential standard of review faithfully implements the text and structure of the Federal Rules and respects the jury's role in our federal system. Yet it also preserves appellate courts' ability to provide meaningful clarification that will guide future decisionmakers.

As the abstract indicates, the Supreme Court may be wrestling with this issue this coming Term in Google LLC v. Oracle America, Inc., which is scheduled for oral argument (telephonically) next Wednesday.

Thanks to the Southeastern Association of Law Schools for letting me present an earlier draft of this paper back in July at the SEALS 2020 Annual Conference Federal Courts and Procedure Panel. I got a lot of great feedback.  

 

 

 

September 29, 2020 in Conferences/Symposia, Federal Courts, Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Recent Scholarship, Supreme Court Cases | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, September 25, 2020

Call for Submissions: Cardozo Law Review Special SCOTUS Nomination Issue

Below is an announcement from the Cardozo Law Review seeking submissions for a special issue on Supreme Court nominations.

Download Call for Submissions - Special SCOTUS Nomination Issue

 

September 25, 2020 in Conferences/Symposia, Current Affairs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Campos on the Civil Procedure Unavailability Workshop

Today on the Courts Law section of JOTWELL is Sergio Campos’s essay, Stay (Faraway, So Close!) in Touch with Civil Procedure, which discusses the Civil Procedure Unavailability Workshop series (covered earlier here).

 

 

September 25, 2020 in Conferences/Symposia, Web/Tech, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, September 1, 2020

Online Civil Procedure Workshop Resumes Today

After a brief hiatus, the Unavailability Civil Procedure Workshop resumes today, on a monthly basis. Here are the fall sessions:

September 1, 2020: Howie Erichson -- Distinguishing Between Facts And Conclusions Under Iqbal

October 6, 2020: Portia Pedro -- Remedies and Civil Procedure

November 10, 2020: Zach Clopton & Colleen Shanahan -- State Civil Procedure

 

 

September 1, 2020 in Conferences/Symposia | Permalink | Comments (0)