Monday, November 27, 2017

Michalski on Dodge & Dodson on Personal Jurisdiction over Aliens

Now on the Courts Law section of JOTWELL is Roger Michalski’s essay, In Search of a Parsimonious Model of Personal Jurisdiction. Roger reviews Bill Dodge’s and Scott Dodson’s recent article, Personal Jurisdiction and Aliens, which is forthcoming in the Michigan Law Review.

 

 

 

 

November 27, 2017 in Recent Scholarship, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Detroit-Mercy Law Review Symposium -- Call for Papers

UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT MERCY LAW REVIEW
CALL FOR PROPOSALS

The Return of Sanctuary Cities: The Muslim Ban, Hurricane Maria, and Everything in Between


The University of Detroit Mercy Law Review is pleased to announce its annual academic
Symposium to be held on March 23, 2018 at University of Detroit Mercy School of Law.
This Symposium will contemplate a broad range of issues associated with Sanctuary Cities –
presentations may focus on a specific era – past, present, or future – or may discuss a subject
through the past, present and propose future solutions. Presentation topics could include, but are
not limited to:


• The potential consequences of Trump’s immigration policies (including the Muslim Ban);
• The ability or inability of Trump and ICE to carry out these immigration policies;
• The constitutionality of Trump’s and ICE’s policies and actions;
• The efficacy of Program 287(g) and the potential consequences thereof;
• The impact of the Countering Violent Extremism (“CVE”) program;
• The efficacy of states’ Sanctuary legislation, like (pro) California and (anti) Texas;
• The ability or inability of cities and states to provide protection to undocumented citizens;
• The rights that undocumented citizens, particularly youth, should enjoy;
• Strategies and policies that cities and states can adopt to protect their undocumented citizens;
• The potential benefits or consequences for cities and states who adopt Sanctuary laws;
• The consequences for the changes made to the DACA program and possible solutions; and
• The position that SCOTUS would take on these issues, including existing legislation & DACA.

The Law Review invites interested individuals to submit an abstract for an opportunity to present at the Symposium. Those interested should send an abstract of 300-400 words that details their proposed topic and presentation. Included with the abstract should be the presenter’s name, contact
information, and a copy of their resume/curriculum vitae. Since the above list of topics is nonexhaustive, the Detroit Mercy Law Review encourages all interested parties to develop their own topic to present at the Symposium. In addition, while submitting an article for publication is not
required to present at the Symposium, the Law Review encourages all speakers who are selected to submit a piece for publication in the 2018-2019 edition of the Law Review.

The deadline for abstract submissions is December 3, 2017. Individuals selected to present at the Symposium will be contacted by December 10, 2017. Law Review editorial staff will contact those selected for publication in 2018 regarding details and deadlines for full-length publication.

The submissions, and any questions regarding the Symposium or the abstract process, should be directed to Law Review Symposium Director, Jessica Gnitt at gnittje@udmercy.edu. Please cc the Detroit Mercy Law Review Editor-in-Chief, Matthew Tapia, at tapiama@udmercy.edu.

November 14, 2017 in Conferences/Symposia | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

SCOTUS Decision in Hamer v. Neighborhood Housing Services: A Question of Time

Today the Supreme Court issued its decision in Hamer v. Neighborhood Housing Services, the first merits decision of the new Term. The Court unanimously holds that FRAP 4(a)(5)(C)’s limit on extensions of time to file a notice of appeal is not jurisdictional. (Rule 4(a)(5)(C) provides: “No extension under this Rule 4(a)(5) may exceed 30 days after the prescribed time or 14 days after the date when the order granting the motion is entered, whichever is later.”)

Justice Ginsburg’s opinion begins:

This case presents a question of time, specifically, time to file a notice of appeal from a district court’s judgment. In Bowles v. Russell, 551 U. S. 205, 210–213 (2007), this Court clarified that an appeal filing deadline prescribed by statute will be regarded as “jurisdictional,” meaning that late filing of the appeal notice necessitates dismissal of the appeal. But a time limit prescribed only in a court-made rule, Bowles acknowledged, is not jurisdictional; it is, instead, a mandatory claim-processing rule subject to forfeiture if not properly raised by the appellee. Ibid.; Kontrick v. Ryan, 540 U. S. 443, 456 (2004). Because the Court of Appeals held jurisdictional a time limit specified in a rule, not in a statute, 835 F. 3d 761, 763 (CA7 2016), we vacate that court’s judgment dismissing the appeal.

The Court left open, however, several issues for the lower court to address on remand, including:

(1) whether respondents’ failure to raise any objection in the District Court to the overlong time extension, by itself, effected a forfeiture, see Brief for Petitioner 21–22; (2) whether respondents could gain review of the District Court’s time extension only by filing their own appeal notice, see id., at 23–27; and (3) whether equitable considerations may occasion an exception to Rule 4(a)(5)(C)’s time constraint, see id., at 29–43.

 

 

 

 

November 8, 2017 in Federal Courts, Recent Decisions, Subject Matter Jurisdiction, Supreme Court Cases | Permalink | Comments (1)

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Erbsen on Lahav on Procedural Design

Now on the Courts Law section of JOTWELL is Allan Erbsen’s essay, Sequential Progression of Dispute Resolution in Federal Courts. Allan reviews Alexandra Lahav’s recent article, Procedural Design.

 

 

 

November 7, 2017 in Federal Courts, Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, Recent Scholarship, Weblogs | Permalink | Comments (1)