Tuesday, October 4, 2016

The Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act: Congress Narrows Foreign Sovereign Immunity

Last week Congress voted to override President Obama’s veto of the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act (JASTA). Although there’s apparently been some “buyer’s remorse” by members of Congress who voted to override the veto, JASTA’s provisions narrowing sovereign immunity are now in effect.

Among other things, JASTA adds a new provision to Title 28 of the U.S. Code: 28 U.S.C. § 1605B. Subsection (b) of the new provision states:

(b) RESPONSIBILITY OF FOREIGN STATES.—A foreign state shall not be immune from the jurisdiction of the courts of the United States in any case in which money damages are sought against a foreign state for physical injury to person or property or death occurring in the United States and caused by—

(1) an act of international terrorism in the United States; and

(2) a tortious act or acts of the foreign state, or of any official, employee, or agent of that foreign state while acting within the scope of his or her office, employment, or agency, regardless where the tortious act or acts of the foreign state occurred.

Subsection (d) provides: “A foreign state shall not be subject to the jurisdiction of the courts of the United States under subsection (b) on the basis of an omission or a tortious act or acts that constitute mere negligence.’’

Download Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act (JASTA)

 

 

 

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/civpro/2016/10/the-justice-against-sponsors-of-terrorism-act-congress-narrows-foreign-sovereign-immunity.html

Current Affairs, Federal Courts, International/Comparative Law, Subject Matter Jurisdiction | Permalink

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