Monday, September 14, 2015

Scholars File Amicus Brief in Spokeo Case Supporting Respondent Robins

On September 8, 2015, ten current or former law professors filed their Brief of Restitution and Remedies Scholars as Amici Curiae in Support of Respondent. 

 

The brief states (at pp. 1-2):

 

If this Court were to adopt petitioner’s proposed rule — that a plaintiff who suffers no harm beyond the loss of his legal rights has no standing to sue — it could wreak havoc with the law of restitution and unjust enrichment, barring many long-established causes of action from federal courts. This important body of law long predates the American founding and serves essential functions, especially in private law but in parts of public law as well.

 

These amici take no position on the underlying statutory claim.

 

SUMMARY OF ARGUMENT

 

Petitioner’s sweeping and ill-defined argument that no plaintiff can have standing without proof of “concrete harm” is aimed at claims for statutory minimum damages. The Court should reject this frontal assault on statutory remedies. But whatever the Court does with respect to statutory damages, it should take care not to inadvertently sweep away much of the law of restitution.

 

The ten individual amici are Mark P. Gergen, Andrew Kull, Douglas Laycock, Colleen P. Murphy, Phil C. Neal, Doug Rendleman, Caprice Roberts, Chaim Saiman, Emily L. Sherwin, and Michael Traynor.  Nine of the ten amici participated in drafting the Restatement (Third) of Restitution and Unjust Enrichment as Reporter, Adviser, or on the Members Consultative Group.

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/civpro/2015/09/scholars-file-amicus-brief-in-spokeo-case-supporting-respondent-robins.html

Standing, Subject Matter Jurisdiction, Supreme Court Cases | Permalink

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