Wednesday, June 30, 2021

Call for Papers - AALS Section on Transactional Law and Skills

CALL FOR PAPERS

AALS SECTION ON TRANSACTIONAL LAW AND SKILLS

Transactional Lawyering at the Intersection of Business and Societal Well-Being

2022 AALS Annual Meeting

The AALS Section on Transactional Law and Skills is pleased to announce a call for papers for its program, “Transactional Lawyering at the Intersection of Business and Societal Well-Being,” at the 2022 annual meeting of the AALS. This program will explore how ESG and broader societal considerations are increasingly influencing the flow of capital in the global marketplace, corporate governance planning, merger and acquisition activity and structures, as well as other transactional topics. The events of 2020, for example, have shifted the focus of business entity governance, equality and access in securities markets, and transactional planning and deal structures in significant and lasting ways – questioning whether current structures and systems are working well for all stakeholders and society more broadly. COVID-19 and social movements have broadened ESG efforts to include previously overlooked issues such as human resource policies (e.g., sick leave, parental leave), workplace health and safety, supply chain management, continuity and emergency planning, and diversity and inclusion hiring practices and training. In addition, proposals are being considered (and some adopted) to require gender diversity on boards of directors as well as additional disclosures related to human capital. This program will look at how transactional lawyering in a variety of contexts can address/respond to recent calls for increased consideration and balancing of ESG issues and impact topics.

The annual meeting will be held virtually from January 5-9, 2022, with the Section on Transactional Law and Skills panel scheduled for Friday, January 7, from 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. (EST). In addition to the paper presentation, the program will feature a panel focusing on how to incorporate these topics and issues across the transactional curriculum, including in clinics and other experiential courses, as well as in doctrinal courses.

Complete call is here: Download AALS Section on Transactional Law & Skills CFP

June 30, 2021 in Colleen Baker, Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 21, 2021

Yoga, Materiality, and the 2021 National Business Law Scholars Conference

So much going on today . . . .   Rather than choose one focus, I will offer three.  Each is near and dear to my heart in one way or another.

Happy International Yoga Day to all.  This year's theme is "Yoga for well-being" or "Yoga for wellness." The Hindustan Times reports: "On International Yoga Day on Monday, Prime Minister Narendra Modi said yoga became a source of inner strength for people and a medium to transform negativity to creativity amid the coronavirus pandemic." The United Nations's website similarly adds that:

The message of Yoga in promoting both the physical and mental well-being of humanity has never been more relevant. A growing trend of people around the world embracing Yoga to stay healthy and rejuvenated and to fight social isolation and depression has been witnessed during the pandemic. Yoga is also playing a significant role in the psycho-social care and rehabilitation of COVID-19 patients in quarantine and isolation. It is particularly helpful in allaying their fears and anxiety.

Yes!  I am so grateful for yoga, including asanas and meditation, and other mindfulness practices at this time--for their positive effects on me, my faculty and staff colleagues, and my students.  👏🏼  Namaste, y'all.

I know from her Twitter feed today that co-blogger Ann Lipton will have much to say on today's publication of the U.S. Supreme Court's opinion in Goldman Sachs Group, Inc., at al. v. Arkansas Teacher Retirement System, et al.  I will just note here two of the more prominent statements made by the Court in this Section 10(b)/Rule 10b-5 class action.  They relate to the common ground between materiality determinations (a doctrinal love of mine and Ann's), which are matters for resolution at trial, and the establishment of a price impact of alleged misstatements and omissions, which is a matter for consideration at the class certification stage.  The Court first concurs with the parties' agreement "that courts may assess the generic nature of a misrepresentation at class certification even though it also may be relevant to materiality, which Amgen reserves for the merits."  Then, in footnote 2, the Court states the following:

We recognize that materiality and price impact are overlapping concepts and that the evidence relevant to one will almost always be relevant to the other. But “a district court may not use the overlap to refuse to consider the evidence.” In re Allstate, 966 F. 3d, at 608. Instead, the district court must use the evidence to decide the price impact issue “while resisting the temptation to draw what may be obvious inferences for the closely related issues that must be left for the merits, including materiality.” Id., at 609. 

I am not a litigator, but it would seem to be a challenge to thread that needle . . . .

Finally, I want to note the successful conclusion of the 2021 National Business Law Scholars Conference last Friday.  Despite our best efforts, there were a few technical glitches, fixed by the University of San Diego School of Law, the University of Southern California Gould School of Law, and the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, each of which assumed unplanned roles as meeting hosts for one of our sessions.  (Thanks, again, to Jordan Barry, Mike Simkovic, and Will Thomas for making those arrangements.)  But the range and quality of presenters and projects was impressive, and the sense of community among the attendees was--as it always is--a highlight of this conference.  The conference tends to bring together a spectrum of international business law teacher/scholars at different stages of their academic careers, all of whom contribute to the productive, supportive, ethos of the event.  My business law colleague George Kuney described the conference well in his opening remarks.

I am grateful to so many at UT Law--including especially George (who directs our business law center) and the faculty and staff who pitched in to host virtual meeting rooms with me.  Their support was invaluable in hosting a virtual version of the conference two years in a row.  I also want to share appreciation for the members of the National Business Law Scholars Conference planning committee (a shout-out to each of you, Afra, Tony, Eric, Steven, Kristin, Elizabeth, Jeff, and Megan) for their collaboration and encouragement, as well as the abundant trust they placed in me these past two years. 

"Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much." ~ Helen Keller

 

June 21, 2021 in Conferences, Joan Heminway, Securities Regulation, Wellness | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 14, 2021

National Business Law Scholars Conference - This Thursday & Friday!

The twelfth annual (and second virtual) National Business Law Scholars Conference (NBLSC) is being hosted by The University of Tennessee College of Law on Zoom this Thursday and Friday, June 17 and 18.  The schedule for the two days of proceedings (fashioned painstakingly and patiently by planning committee member Eric Chaffee) can be found here.  Zoom links for each session are included.

This year's conference boasts, in addition to the NBLSC's flagship scholarly paper panels, a Thursday plenary session at 1:00 pm (Eastern Daylight Time) entitled "Beyond Shareholder Primacy."  The session focuses on Matt Bodie and Grant Hayden's new book, Reconstructing the Corporation: From Shareholder Primacy to Shared Governance, which follows on their 2020 Boston University Law Review article "The Corporation Reborn: From Shareholder Primacy to Shared Governance."  The 2021 conference also features a later start time each day to be more inclusive of our West coast participants.

I join the rest of the planning committee (listed below) in looking forward to seeing many of you at the conference.  Please contact any of us with questions.

Afra Afsharipour (University of California, Davis, School of Law)
Tony Casey (The University of Chicago Law School)
Eric C. Chaffee (The University of Toledo College of Law)
Steven Davidoff Solomon (University of California, Berkeley School of Law)
Joan MacLeod Heminway (The University of Tennessee College of Law)
Kristin N. Johnson (Emory University School of Law)
Elizabeth Pollman (University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School)
Jeff Schwartz (University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law)
Megan Wischmeier Shaner (University of Oklahoma College of Law)

June 14, 2021 in Conferences, Joan Heminway | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, June 1, 2021

Short Paper: The Benefits and Burdens of Limited Liability

I recently received the final version of my short article, "The Benefits and Burdens of Limited Liability," in Transactions: The Tennessee Journal of Business Law.  The article is based on some of my prior blog posts, as well as my presentation as part of the fourth annual Business Law Prof Blog symposium, Connecting the ThreadsIt was great event, as always, thanks to Joan and the whole crew at Tennessee Law, and it was my pleasure to be part of it.  

Here's the abstract: 

Law students in business associations and people starting businesses often think the only choice for forming a business entity is a limited liability entity like a corporation or a limited liability company (LLC). Although seeking a limited liability entity is usually justifiable, and usually wise, this Article addresses some of the burdens that come from making that decision. We often focus only on the benefits. This Article ponders limited liability as a default rule for contracts with a named business and considers circumstances when choosing a limited liability entity might not communicate what a business owner intends. The Article notes also that when choosing an entity, you get benefits, like limited liability, but burdens (such as need for counsel or tax consequences) also attach. It's not a one-way street. The Article closes by urging courts to consider both the benefits and burdens of an entity choice, especially in considering whether to uphold or disregard an entity, to help parties achieve some measure of certainty and equity.

The journal also has thoughtful and insightful commentary from Professor George Kuney (available here) and student Tyler Ring (here). 

 

 

June 1, 2021 in Conferences, Corporate Personality, Corporations, Joan Heminway, Joshua P. Fershee, Lawyering, LLCs, Partnership | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, May 30, 2021

Reminder: Emory Law Conference - This Friday, Featuring Two BLPB Editors!

Grading done?  Join in for an engaged, energizing day with fellow business law profs to start the summer.

Grading not done?  This is sure to be a fun and enlightening distraction--better than house cleaning or laundry!

Not grading at all (you lucky ducky)?  Clear the decks of other impediments and come join us for what always is a super day filled with teaching tips and catalysts for scholarship and service.

+++++

REGISTER NOW! CONFERENCE IS JUNE 4th!

Emory Law's 7th biennial conference on the teaching of transactional law and skills is just a few days away! Register here and join us on Friday, June 4th. (Note: The Registration Fee for this one-day, online conference is $50.) A copy of the Conference schedule is posted here.

Connect with transactional law and skills educators across the country to ponder our theme - "Emerging from the Crisis: The Future of Law and Skills Education." You'll hear illuminating keynote addresses from three leaders in our field - Joan MacLeod Heminway, Marcia Narine Weldon, and Robert J. Rhee. And you'll participate in exciting presentations and try-this exercises designed to help us all become better teachers.

At day's end, we'll hold a Vision Workshop to synthesize our vision for the future. We'll also announce the winner of the Tina L. Stark Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Transactional Law and Skills, chosen from a group of illustrious nominees.

Special Note: The State Bar of Georgia has approved our conference for four CLE credits. We will provide attendance certificates for other states.

May 30, 2021 in Conferences, Joan Heminway, Lawyering, Marcia Narine Weldon, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, May 28, 2021

Transactional Law, Skills, and Tech Competency

A reminder that Emory’s 2021 conference on transactional law and skills education is next Friday, June 4, 2021. It is virtual and registration is only $50. Register here.

Today, I'm submitting a guest post by Professor Jen Randolph Reise of Mitchell Hamline School of Law.  On Friday the 11th, I'll post my reflections from the Emory conference. Jen and I have bonded over our mission to bring practical skills into the classroom. Her remarks are  below:

I’m looking forward to hearing from many leaders in transactional legal education, including keynote speakers Joan MacLeod Heminway, Marcia Narine Weldon, and Robert J. Rhee on the theme of “Emerging from the Crisis: Future of Transactional Law and Skills Education.” Marcia will also be talking about her experience launching a transactional program at Miami, joined by three of her adjunct professors.

For my part, I’ll be presenting a Try-This session sharing how I have used exercises that integrate key technological resources and techniques into teaching doctrinal courses. I’ve written in this blog before in praise of practice problems, especially in the asynchronous or flipped classroom. These exercises take that one step farther by creating a self-paced, guided discovery and low-stakes practice of some skills and resources they will need to be transactional lawyers.

Specifically, participants in the Try-This session will be introduced to, and invited to try, three exercises I have created and used in Business Organizations and M&A:

1) a State Filings Exercise, which facilitates student discovery of their state’s business entity statutes and secretary of state filing site (for example, they learn how to form an LLC, and what information on LLCs is publicly accessible);

2) a Public Company Filings Exercise, which guides students through accessing and understanding the structure of public company SEC filings and how to retrieve pertinent information from EDGAR; and

3) a Working with Definitive Agreements Exercise, which introduces M&A students to drafting based on samples and from a term sheet, and requires them to learn to create a redline using Word’s Compare feature.

I’d love to have you attend on Friday and share your experiences and feedback. Or, feel free to contact me at jen.reise@mitchellhamline.edu or on Twitter @JensJourneyOn anytime for copies or to share ideas. As a transactional in-house lawyer, newly come to the academy, I’m passionate about students getting a foothold in the distinct perspective, skills, and technology they need to become successful transactional lawyers.

May 28, 2021 in Conferences, Joan Heminway, Law School, M&A, Marcia Narine Weldon, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 25, 2021

Inaugural West Coast Bankruptcy Roundtable Call For Papers

USC Gould School of Law and Lewis & Clark Law School present the inaugural West Coast Bankruptcy Roundtable to be held February 3-4, 2022 in Los Angeles. Spearheaded by Robert Rasmussen, Michael Simkovic, and Samir Parikh, the Roundtable seeks to bring together experienced and junior scholars to discuss particularly noteworthy scholarship involving financial restructuring and business law. We seek scholars researching diverse topics and will be interested in interdisciplinary perspectives.

The Roundtable invites the submission of papers. Selected participants will receive a $1,000 stipend and have the opportunity to workshop their papers in an intimate, collegial setting.

Papers will be selected through a blind review process. Scholars are invited to submit a 3 - 5 page overview of a proposed paper. Submissions may be an introduction or excerpt from an existing unpublished paper, an extended abstract, or a general paper proposal. The submission should be anonymized, and – aside from general citations to the author’s previous work – all references to the author should be removed.

Please submit proposals by September 7, 2021. Invitations will be issued via email by October 8th. Working drafts of papers must be available for circulation to participants by January 11, 2022.

The Roundtable will start with a panel discussion on the Caesars bankruptcy case led by Sujeet Indap (co-author of The Caesars Palace Coup), Bruce Bennett (Jones Day), Ken Liang (former Head of Restructuring, Oaktree Capital), and Richard Davis (examiner in the Caesars bankruptcy case).

Proposals – as well as questions and concerns – should be directed to Samir Parikh at sparikh@lclark.edu.

May 25, 2021 in Bankruptcy/Reorganizations, Call for Papers, Conferences, Joan Heminway | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, May 12, 2021

National Business Law Scholars 2021 - Going Virtual, Again

The planning committee for the National Business Law Scholars Conference has again determined to host a virtual workshop this year (June 17-18). As is the custom, the workshop will consist of several keynote events and many, many moderated paper panels featuring the work of business law scholars who submitted proposals. We are working on finalizing the program now.  Each registrant for the 2021 conference who submitted an accepted proposal will receive a message with additional details. 

As you may recall, the conference this year was scheduled to be held at The University of Tennessee College of Law. We still do hope to hold a future National Business Law Scholars Conference at UT Law in Knoxville--perhaps next June. Stay tuned for more on that at a later time.  However, for those who have a yen to travel out my way this June during the conference (maybe your heart was set on it--or at least on getting out of the house), I am happy to host you in person.  While our campus has various restrictions that would need to be addressed for you to access our buildings, the surrounding area (Knoxville and East Tennessee generally, including the Great Smoky Mountains National Park) is rapidly returning to normalcy in most aspects.  Please let me know if you would like to visit our area and patch into the conference from Knoxville.

It looks like we may have a record number of attendees this year.  All of us on the planning committee (listed below) are grateful to all who registered.  We truly look forward to getting everyone together in person next year.  For many of us, this conference has a unique capacity to produce discussions that push our work forward.  While we understand (now, more than ever) that a virtual meeting is not a perfect substitute for an in-person event, we hope to make the conference engaging and useful to all.

Afra Afsharipour (University of California, Davis, School of Law)
Tony Casey (The University of Chicago Law School)
Eric C. Chaffee (The University of Toledo College of Law)
Steven Davidoff Solomon (University of California, Berkeley School of Law)
Joan MacLeod Heminway (The University of Tennessee College of Law)
Kristin N. Johnson (Tulane University Law School)
Elizabeth Pollman (University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School)
Jeff Schwartz (University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law)
Megan Wischmeier Shaner (University of Oklahoma College of Law)

May 12, 2021 in Conferences, Joan Heminway, Research/Scholarhip | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 4, 2021

Celebrating and Honoring Roberta Karmel

Brooklyn Law School is hosting a two-day symposium next week to celebrate Roberta Karmel on her retirement. Here is the key part of the promotional blurb:

Join us to celebrate the career of Professor Roberta Karmel, the Centennial Professor of Law at Brooklyn Law School. Professor Karmel has been a pathbreaker in all senses of the word. She was the first female partner at the law firm of Rogers and Wells, the first female Commissioner of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, and, for over 30 years, a teacher, mentor, colleague, and prominent scholar of business and securities law.

The symposium will be held virtually May 13-14 and will include a celebration of Professor Karmel’s career hosted by the Law School with tributes from the BLS community, alumni, and special guests.

Additional information about the program (including a link to the registration form) can be found here, and the agenda can be found here.  I am privileged to be a speaker at this event.  Roberta is a hero of mine and an inspiration to us all.  I hope that you can attend. 

Please note that the organizers have invited folks to leave a short anecdote regarding or tribute to Roberta.  The registration form offers a place to do that.  But I suspect that friend-of-the-BLPB Miriam Baer (who is a coordinator of the program) would be happy to take an email from you if that proves to be best.  Her email address is miriam.baer@brooklaw.edu.

May 4, 2021 in Conferences, Joan Heminway | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 19, 2021

2021 Emory Law Conference - Extension of Deadlines for Proposals and Nominations

ANNOUNCEMENT

Proposal and Nomination Deadline Extension

It is our pleasure to announce that the proposal and award nomination deadlines for Emory Law’s seventh biennial transactional law and skills education conference have been extended to 5 pm EDT May 7, 2021. Registration is open for the conference, which will be held virtually on June 4, 2021.

Join us to celebrate and explore our theme – Emerging from the Crisis: The Future of Transactional Law and Skills Education with you. This year, we have reduced the registration fee to $50 per person. Secure your space today!

Take a moment to review the Call for Proposals and submit your proposal here. Also, please share the CFP with your colleagues who may not have attended the Conference before. Consider forwarding it to adjuncts and professors teaching relevant subjects. Can you also think of any teachers who might be interested in attending or presenting? The Call for Proposals deadline is 5 p.m. EDT May 7, 2021. We look forward to receiving your proposals.

Last, but certainly not least, at this year’s Conference, we will announce the winner of the second Tina L. Stark Award for Teaching Excellence. Would you like to nominate yourself or a colleague for this award? We are currently accepting nominations for the 2021 Tina L. Stark Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Transactional Law and Skills. You may submit your nomination here. The nomination deadline is 5 p.m. Friday, May 7, 2021. Please see here for more information about the nomination and selection process.

If you have questions regarding any of this information, please contact Kelli Pittman, Program Coordinator, at kelli.pittman@emory.edu or 404.727.3382.

Sue Payne | Executive Director

Katherine Koops | Assistant Director

Kelli Pittman | Program Coordinator

April 19, 2021 in Call for Papers, Conferences, Joan Heminway | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, April 5, 2021

Reminder: 2021 National Business Law Scholars Conference - Last Call for Papers

Just a quick reminder that paper submissions for the National Business Law Scholars Conference for this year are due on or before April 9--this Friday.  The conference is scheduled for June 17-18, 2021 and is being hosted by The University of Tennessee College of Law in a hybrid or virtual format.  Submissions can be made through the conference website.

The full call for papers is posted here.  Feel free to leave comments or questions below.  Questions also can be directed to Eric Chaffee, the member of the planning committee in charge of program structuring logistics.

April 5, 2021 in Conferences, Joan Heminway | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, March 22, 2021

2021 Emory Law Conference on the Teaching of Transactional Law and Skills

EmoryConference2021

Registration is Open!

It is our great pleasure to announce that registration is now open for the seventh biennial transactional law and skills education conference to be held virtually on June 4, 2021. Please join us to celebrate and explore our theme – Emerging from the Crisis: The Future of Transactional Law and Skills Education with you. This year, we have reduced the registration fee to $50 per person. Secure your space today!

Call for Proposals

Please take a moment to review the Call for Proposals and submit your proposal here. Also, please share the CFP with your colleagues who may not have attended the Conference before. Consider forwarding it to adjuncts and professors teaching relevant subjects. Can you also think of any teachers who might be interested in attending or presenting?

The Call for Proposals deadline is 5 p.m. April 15, 2021. We look forward to receiving your proposals.

Last, but certainly not least, at this year’s Conference, we will announce the winner of the second Tina L. Stark Award for Teaching Excellence. Would you like to nominate yourself or a colleague for this award? More information will be forthcoming regarding award eligibility and the nomination process.

If you have questions regarding any of this information, please contact Kelli Pittman, Program Coordinator, at kelli.pittman@emory.edu or 404.727.3382.

We look forward to “seeing” you in June!

Sue Payne | Executive Director

Katherine Koops | Assistant Director

Kelli Pittman | Program Coordinator

March 22, 2021 in Conferences, Joan Heminway, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, March 16, 2021

2021 National Business Law Scholars Conference - Call for Papers

2021 National Business Law Scholars Conference
June 17-18, 2021

The University of Tennessee College of Law
Knoxville, Tennessee

Call for Papers

The National Business Law Scholars Conference (NBLSC) will be held on Thursday and Friday, June 17-18, 2021.  The 2021 conference is being hosted by The University of Tennessee College of Law.  The conference will be conducted in a hybrid or online format, as determined by the NBLSC planning committee in the early part of 2021.

This is the twelfth meeting of the NBLSC, an annual conference that draws legal scholars from across the United States and around the world. We welcome all scholarly submissions relating to business law. Junior scholars and those considering entering the academy are especially encouraged to participate. If you are thinking about entering the academy and would like to receive informal mentoring and learn more about job market dynamics, please let us know when you make your submission.  We expect to be in a position to offer separate programming for aspiring law professors and market entrants, as we have done in the past, likely on a separate date after the conference concludes.

Please use the conference website to submit an abstract or paper by April 9, 2021.  If you have any questions, concerns, or special requests regarding the schedule, please email Professor Eric C. Chaffee at eric.chaffee@utoledo.edu. We will respond to submissions with notifications of acceptance shortly after the deadline. We anticipate the conference schedule will be circulated in May.

Conference Planning Committee:

Afra Afsharipour (University of California, Davis, School of Law)
Tony Casey (The University of Chicago Law School)
Eric C. Chaffee (The University of Toledo College of Law)
Steven Davidoff Solomon (University of California, Berkeley School of Law)
Joan MacLeod Heminway (The University of Tennessee College of Law)
Kristin N. Johnson (Emory University School of Law)
Elizabeth Pollman (University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School)
Jeff Schwartz (University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law)
Megan Wischmeier Shaner (University of Oklahoma College of Law)

March 16, 2021 in Conferences, Joan Heminway, Research/Scholarhip | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, February 15, 2021

UK Law Market & Tech Conference - This Thursday and Friday!

The following news of a virtual conference (hosted by the University of Kentucky Rosenberg College of Law, with support from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation) comes to us from Ramsi Woodcock at UK Law/Business & Econ:
 
Please join us as we think through antitrust, data, taxation, consumer welfare, property, bigness, and tech policy from the perspective of the distribution of wealth at Inframarginalism & Internet: A Conference on Markets as Wealth Distributors, and the Implications for Tech Policy, which will be held online on Thursday, February 18 and Friday, February 19.
 
 
 
Speakers include:
 
-Herbert Hovenkamp
-Fiona Scott Morton
-A. Douglas Melamed
-Thomas Philippon, author of The Great Reversal: How America Gave Up on Free Markets
 
-Katharina Pistor, author of The Code of Capital: How the Law Creates Wealth and Inequality
 
-Chris Sagers, author of United States v. Apple: Competition in America
-David J. Teece
-Susan Crawford, author of Fiber: The Coming Tech Revolution--and Why America Might Miss It
-Gerrit De Geest, author of Rents: How Marketing Causes Inequality
 
Panels include:
Antitrust Futures
The Meaning and Control of Bigness
Redistribution Through Antitrust and Consumer Law
Taxation and Tech
Data and Power
Rent Theoretic Approaches to Property Law
A New Rent Theory?
 
 
 

February 15, 2021 in Conferences, Joan Heminway, Technology, Web/Tech | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, January 29, 2021

The New Normal of ESG Across Borders

Please join me for this ABA Conference on February 10-11. I'm excited to serve as a mock board member on the 11th as well as on the plenary panel on “Leading Voices in ESG Initiatives” with representatives from United Airlines, Microsoft Asia, and others focusing on the many and sometimes conflicting imperatives of implementing ESG goals. I'll be particularly interested in the session by the General Motors GC, who will speak about the plan to go away from gasoline-powered vehicles, which GM just announced.

You can register by clicking here.

About the Virtual Conference:

The state of New York, on December 9, 2020, announced that its pension fund with over $226 billion in assets would divest its oil and gas stocks in companies that, in its view, contribute to global warming. The announcement emphatically highlights how ESG factors (Environmental, Social and Governance) across borders represent business risks but also opportunities for companies, their stockholders, and their other stakeholders. In-house legal departments are the first line of defense to re-orient business operations to address global ESG issues and to identify risks. These challenges, risks and opportunities are creating additional demands on legal departments with constrained resources as they navigate this “New Normal” in addition to their traditional responsibilities to stockholders.  This two-day conference will provide in-depth critical analysis through three tracks that efficiently canvas each of the ‘E’, ‘S’ and ‘G’ elements. Through these three tracks, the conference will identify, explore, and evaluate key areas of relevance to in-house counsel wanting to navigate the numerous complex legal and operational issues raised by ESG in jurisdictions around the globe.

Key Speakers:

  • Craig Glidden, Executive Vice President and General Counsel, General Motors
  • Tim O’Connor, Senior Director, Environmental Defense Fund
  • Olga V. Mack, CEO, Parley Pro
  • Ashley Scott, Senior Counsel, Lime
  • In-House Executives: Several current and former General Counsel, along with numerous senior in-house counsel across various industries, including Google, Nestle, Microsoft, General Motors, Accenture, LexisNexis, Chubb, United Airlines, Liberty Mutual, OPEC, Lazard, Iron Mountain, Willis Towers Watson, Norsk Hydro, and Equinor.
  • ESG leaders: Leading ESG voices from law firms, non-profit organizations, and universities

What to Expect

This two-day cutting-edge conference will provide opportunities for-in-depth analysis of these issues through three tracks of interactive panel discussions that canvas each of the ‘E’, ‘S’ and ‘G’ elements, including how COVID-19 is accelerating ESG trends. Key areas of relevance to in-house counsel wanting to navigate the numerous complex legal and operational issues raised by ESG in jurisdictions around the globe, including NGO and government stakeholder perspectives, will also be examined.

CLEs will be available. I hope to see you there!

January 29, 2021 in Compliance, Conferences, Corporate Governance, Corporations, CSR, Current Affairs, Marcia Narine Weldon | Permalink | Comments (2)

Monday, January 4, 2021

AALS 2021 - Teaching Leadership in Law Schools

As our legal academy readers know, this week features the annual conference of the Association of American Law Schools ("AALS"), the professional association for law schools and their faculty and staff.  I am sure many of us will publish posts now and later about the conference and its varied programs.  I focus today on the Section on Leadership, of which my Dean (Doug Blaze) is the current chair.  Doug has been among the national leaders in the movement to teach leadership in law schools.  Among other things, he was a founder of the section and of the Institute for Professional Leadership at UT Law (of which I am the current Interim Director).

I highlight two things in this post.

First, the Fall 2020 section newsletter deserves attention.  The entire issue focuses on racism.  It includes a number of short articles written by a variety of contributors, including (but not limited to) law professors.  Tony Thompson, Professor of Clinical Law at NYU Law, introduces the issue, referencing the events that catapulted racism and racial injustice into the legal news and public eye in meaningful ways earlier this year.  He writes: "T]he public protests have . . . sparked . . . a relentless insistence that we acknowledge the stark reality that racism infects every system in this country. We as lawyers, as law teachers, as people who care about justice must actively work toward a genuine reckoning on race and racism in this country."  Among the contributions are articles written by Berkeley Law Dean Erwin Chemerinsky, a prep school student from Newark, New Jersey, and our Visiting Leadership Fellow at UT Law, David Gibbs.  The issue makes for thought-provoking end-of-year reading and inspires leadership on race issues in and through law teaching (among many other things).

Second, I want to promote the four programs sponsored or co-sponsored by the AALS Section on Leadership.  They are listed below.

  • Calling Out and Leaning In to Racial and Class Inequities in Experiential Learning Opportunities (Wednesday, January 6, 11:00 am - 12:15 pm)
  • Never Let A Good Crisis Go To Waste; The Pedagogy of Leadership During Crisis—Student Engagement (Thursday, January 7, 11:00 am - 12:15 pm)
  • Legal and Judicial Ethics in the Post-#MeToo World (Thursday, January 7, 2:45 pm - 4:00 pm)
  • Teaching Leadership Skills in a Time of Crisis (Saturday, January 9, 2:45 pm - 4:00 pm)

I have the honor of presenting a short "idea paper" on teaching change leadership to law students at the Thursday morning session.  I hope that you will join me in attending some or all of these programs if you are registered to attend the conference.  Our students are the legal and community leaders of tomorrow.  Studying and practicing leadership in law school can help them to see their leadership potential, harness it, and use it constructively in and outside law practice.

The entire program for this year's AALS annual meeting can be found here.

January 4, 2021 in Conferences, Joan Heminway, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, December 21, 2020

National Business Law Scholars 2021 - Save the Date; Paper Submissions Accepted Starting in January

2021 National Business Law Scholars Conference
June 17-18, 2021

The University of Tennessee College of Law
Knoxville, Tennessee

The National Business Law Scholars Conference (NBLSC) will be held on Thursday and Friday, June 17-18, 2021.  The 2021 conference is being hosted by The University of Tennessee College of Law.  The conference will be conducted in a hybrid or online format, as determined by the NBLSC planning committee in the early part of 2021.

This is the twelfth meeting of the NBLSC, an annual conference that draws legal scholars from across the United States and around the world. We welcome all scholarly submissions relating to business law. Junior scholars and those considering entering the academy are especially encouraged to participate. If you are thinking about entering the academy and would like to receive informal mentoring and learn more about job market dynamics, please let us know when you make your submission.  We expect to be in a position to offer separate programming for aspiring law professors and market entrants, as we have done in the past, likely on a separate date after the conference concludes.

Please use the conference website, which will be available at https://law.utk.edu/ in January, to submit an abstract or paper by April 9, 2021. An announcement will be made on the Business Law Prof Blog when the conference site becomes available.  If you have any questions, concerns, or special requests regarding the schedule, please email Professor Eric C. Chaffee at eric.chaffee@utoledo.edu. We will respond to submissions with notifications of acceptance shortly after the deadline. We anticipate the conference schedule will be circulated in May.

Conference Planning Committee:

Afra Afsharipour (University of California, Davis, School of Law)
Tony Casey (The University of Chicago Law School)
Eric C. Chaffee (The University of Toledo College of Law)
Steven Davidoff Solomon (University of California, Berkeley School of Law)
Joan MacLeod Heminway (The University of Tennessee College of Law)
Kristin N. Johnson (Emory University School of Law)
Elizabeth Pollman (University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School)
Jeff Schwartz (University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law)
Megan Wischmeier Shaner (University of Oklahoma College of Law)

December 21, 2020 in Conferences, Joan Heminway, Research/Scholarhip | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, October 27, 2020

2020 American Bar Association LLC Institute - Free for Law Students!

ABALogo(2020)
I have written about the American Bar Association Limited Liability Institute in this space before.  See, e.g., here, here, here, here, and here.  The 2020 LLC Institute is being hosted virtually and begins next Friday--something to look forward to at the end of election week!  This ABA program is always a premier event, and it is the only national annual program that focuses in exclusively on LLCs and unincorporated business associations.

Importantly, this year's institute is free to law students.  I have recommended registration and attendance to mine.  Click here for more information, including the agenda, list of speakers (including yours truly!), and registration.

October 27, 2020 in Conferences, Joan Heminway, LLCs, Teaching, Unincorporated Entities | Permalink | Comments (1)

Monday, October 26, 2020

Chiarella at 40: Upcoming Conference

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The NYU Pollack Center for Law & Business, Indiana University Maurer School of Law, and Securities and Exchange Commission Historical Society invite you to a virtual program entitled "Insider Trading: Honoring the Past|A Program Commemorating the 40th Anniversary of Chiarella v. United States," which will take place on Thursday, November 5th from 10am-noon Eastern Time.

The program will explore the fascinating backstories of the Chiarella prosecution and the Supreme Court argument as well as the SEC’s and DOJ’s insider trading enforcement strategies in the wake of the Court’s ruling. The Chiarella case is also the subject of Donna Nagy’s recent essay, Chiarella v. United States and its Indelible Impact on Insider Trading Law.

A webinar link will be circulated to all those who RSVP, which you can do here. Conference details and schedule are below.

Conference Organizers:

Stephen Choi, Murray and Kathleen Bring Professor of Law, NYU School of Law, Co-Director Pollack Center for Law and Business
Donna M. Nagy, C. Ben Dutton Professor of Law, Indiana University Maurer School of Law
Jane Cobb, Executive Director, SEC Historical Society

Schedule:

10:00am Welcome by Stephen Choi, Murray and Kathleen Bring Professor of Law, NYU School of Law, Co-Director Pollack Center for Law and Business

10:10-11:10am    Session I: The Chiarella Prosecution and Supreme Court Litigation

John S. Siffert, Co-Founding Partner, Lankler Siffert Wohl; Adjunct Professor—NYU School of Law (Assistant US Attorney in the SDNY 1974-1979, prosecuted the Chiarella case and argued the 2nd Circuit appeal)
John “Rusty” Wing, Partner, Lankler Siffert Wohl (Chief of the Securities and Business Fraud Unit for the SDNY’s U.S. Attorney’s Office 1971-1978)
Hon. Judge Jed S. Rakoff, U.S. District Judge SDNY (Chief of the Securities and Business Fraud Unit for the SDNY’s U.S. Attorney’s Office 1978-1980)
Stanley S. Arkin, founding member of Arkin Solbakken (represented Vincent Chiarella at his criminal trial, 2nd Circuit appeal, and argument before the Supreme Court)
• Panel Moderator: Donna M. Nagy, C. Ben Dutton Professor of Law, Indiana University Maurer School of Law

11:10am-12:00pm    Session II: The SEC and DOJ’s Response to the Supreme Court’s Chiarella Decision

Donald C. Langevoort, Thomas Aquinas Reynolds Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center (SEC Special Counsel, Office of General Counsel, 1978-1981)
Lee S. Richards III, Co-Founding Partner, Richards Kibbe & Orbe (Assistant US Attorney in the SDNY 1977-1983, prosecuted US v. Newman based on the misappropriation theory advanced in, but left undecided by, the Court’s Chiarella ruling)
Hon. Judge Jed S. Rakoff, U.S. District Judge SDNY (SDNY Fraud Unit Chief during the Newman investigation, later served as defense counsel in Carpenter v. United States)
• Panel Moderator: Robert B. Thompson, Peter P. Weidenbruch, Jr. Professor of Business Law Georgetown University Law Center

October 26, 2020 in Conferences, Joan Heminway, Securities Regulation | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, October 9, 2020

How Are You Doing?

How are you doing? I'm exhausted between teaching, grading, consulting, writing, and living through a pandemic. I actually wasn't planning to post today because I post every other Friday, as a way to maintain some balance. I may not post next Friday because I'll be participating in  Connecting the Threads, IV, our business law professor blog annual conference. It's virtual and you may get up to 8 CLE credits, including an ethics credit. If you love our posts, you'll get to see us up close and personal, and you won't even need a mask.

I decided to do this short post today because it may help some of you, whether you're professors or practitioners. Several years ago, Haskell Murray wrote that he does a mid-semester survey. He asks his students what they like and don't like. I love this idea ... in theory. How many of us really want to know how we're doing? I've done it a couple of times when I knew that the class was going great, but I don't do it consistently. I decided to do it this year because we are piloting a new program modeled after Emory's Transactional Law Program. I used to teach one or two sections of transactional drafting every semester by myself, but now I do the lecture portion (asynchronously) and six adjuncts teach the skills portion in live classes via Zoom (for now). In some ways, it was easier to teach by myself. Five of the six adjuncts are teaching for the first time, and online at that. It's not easy. I also do pre-recorded videos with questions embedded via Feedback Fruits that students must answer. Each week, I review the answers for each of the classes, look for trends and gaps in knowledge, debrief with the adjuncts, hold office hours with the students, and try to find current events related to what we are doing. I also teach two sections of legal writing to 1Ls. My  life is a constant stream of conferences and marking up drafts.

Students tell me they love the transactional drafting class, but what about those who don't say anything? So, I bit the bullet and sent out an anonymous survey to the seventy students enrolled. So far less than 1/3 have responded, but I've already gleaned valuable insight. I sent the survey out two days ago and I've already changed the structure of my videos and am holding a mid-semester review. The students validated my concerns about one of our books. Some students were just glad to be asked. Most important, I won't have to wait until the evaluations at the end of the semester. 

Ironically, when I consult with companies on employee relations or corporate culture issues, I recommend that they do a Start, Stop, Continue or Do More, Do Not Change, Do Less exercise with the employees. I've even led focus groups on this, and employees love it because they feel engaged. As long as the company actually commits to making changes as appropriate, it's a powerful tool.

I challenge you to ask your students or your employees how you're doing, especially in these trying times. You may be surprised. If you have other novel recommendation for getting feedback from students or employees, let us know in the comments.

I hope to see you next week at the Connecting the Threads Conference.

 

October 9, 2020 in Conferences, Haskell Murray, Law School, Lawyering, Marcia Narine Weldon, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (2)