Monday, August 31, 2020

AALS Section on Transactional Law and Skills: Call for Papers – EXTENDED DEADLINE

Call for Papers – EXTENDED DEADLINE

AALS Section on Transactional Law and Skills

The New Public Interest in Private Markets: Transactional Innovation for Promoting Inclusion

January 5-9, 2021, AALS Annual Meeting


The AALS Section on Transactional Law and Skills is pleased to announce a program titled The New Public Interest in Private Markets: Transactional Innovation for Promoting Inclusion during the 2021 AALS Annual Meeting, which will be held virtually. This session will explore how recent developments in corporate and transactional practice address issues of bias in corporate governance and the workplace, with examples ranging from Weinstein representations & warranties in M&A agreements to California’s Women on Boards statute to inclusion riders in the entertainment industry. These developments raise immediate questions of whether public policy goals of achieving greater inclusivity are being met, and they also shed light on perennial debates about the role public law and private ordering play in spurring social innovation.

In addition to paper presentations, the program will feature a panel focusing on how to incorporate concepts, issues, and discussions of equity and inclusivity across the transactional curriculum, including in clinics and other experiential courses, as well as in doctrinal courses.

FORMAT: Scholars whose papers are selected will provide a presentation of their paper, followed by commentary and audience Q&A.

SUBMISSION PROCEDURE: Scholars who are interested in participating in the program should send a draft or summary of at least three pages to Professor Matt Jennejohn at jennejohnm@law.byu.edu on or before Friday, September 25, 2020. The subject line of the email should read: “Submission—AALS Transactional Law and Skills Section Program.”

Scholars whose papers are selected for the program will need to submit a draft by December 16, 2020.

Pursuant to AALS rules, faculty at fee-paid non-member law schools, foreign faculty, adjunct and visiting faculty (without a full-time position at an AALS member law school), graduate students, fellows, and non-law school faculty are not eligible to submit. Please note that all presenters at the program are responsible for paying their own annual meeting registration fees and travel expenses.

August 31, 2020 in Call for Papers, Conferences, Joan Heminway | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, August 5, 2020

ALSB International Section Meeting and Ralph Bunche Award for Best International Paper

The Academy of Legal Studies in Business is in the midst of its annual conference.  And, not surprisingly, it’s completely online.  Although we aren’t able to meet in person this year, the event has been a really great, remarkably smooth experience.  Pre-pandemic, the Program Chair, Professor Robert Bird, at the University of Connecticut School of Business, presciently selected the theme of “Managing Disruption.”

For me, one highlight of the conference thus far has been the opportunity to hear guest speaker Lee Buchheit’s remarks to the ALSB’s International Section on the “State of the Art of Sovereign Debt Restructuring.”  Buchheit is arguably the world’s leading expert on sovereign debt restructuring.  As an FT Alphaville piece put it: Buchheit “has represented nearly every country that has gone bankrupt since the 1980s, sparring with aggrieved creditors and cajoling stricken governments back to fiscal health — and in the process almost single-handedly building up an entire field of international law.”  He didn’t disappoint, giving us a fascinating overview of the major disruption the pandemic is causing in the sovereign debt arena, and the likely challenges that lie ahead, including the risk of a systemic sovereign debt crisis such as happened in the 1980s.  For readers interested in learning more about Buchheit’s perspectives on the impending issues in sovereign debt markets, a few places to start are here and here.

Afterwards, the International Section elected a new officer, Professor Justin Evans, to serve the Section, along with Professor Kevin Fandl (President) and myself (Vice-President).  A total, but quick, fun digression: Fandl has led several faculty development trips in international business to Chile to study innovation in Chile focused on wine.  Watch out for the next iteration! 

Our Section meeting was followed by presentations for the ALSB Ralph Bunche Award for Best International Paper.  This Award aims to recognize excellent, unpublished research in the area of international business law.  There were many exceptional submissions, and it was difficult to select the finalists.  Professor Abbey Stemler presented Regulation of Sharing Economy Platforms: A Multi-Country Comparative StudyProfessors Brian Feinstein and Kevin Werbach discussed The Impact of Regulation on Global Cryptocurrency Trading (here).  Professor Tim Samples, the winner of the Award for 2020, spoke about Investment Disputes and Federal Power in Foreign Relations (here).

Finally, I want to send a big THANK YOU to outgoing President Professor Stephen Park!  With his tireless work for, and commitment to, the Section, he did a great job of modeling for future officers excellence in this role.         

August 5, 2020 in Colleen Baker, Conferences, International Business, International Law | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, August 2, 2020

Tips for Online Teaching- Part V

Greetings from SEALS (virtually). I've just finished sitting in on the last of several excellent panels on online teaching. Below are tips from the panelists, some of my own lessons learned, and key takeaways from the excellent book Small Teaching Online.  For more of the foundations of online teaching see Part I,   Part IIPart III, and Part IV.

  • Have a class zero- you and students can record an introduction of themselves, pets, hobbies, skills, talents etc. Make sure you’re smiling and conveying your excitement in the video about the class.
  • You can also have a class zero where you spend 5 minutes on Zoom with each student before the first day of class talking to them about any questions they have about the class, their tech etc. 
  • Let students know that this online format is not just a pandemic issue. Virtual offices are increasingly common in practice.
  • Think about how to motivate students- what counts as a grade? Should you raise the class participation component and if so, how will you measure it? Will watching videos before class and participating in discussion boards count?
  • Stand when recording your video lectures or teaching synchronously. Students prefer it. You can get a standing desk or go old school like me and use a pile of textbooks to create a lectern.
  • Think about creating mnemonic devices through your intentional use of imagery. Use images appropriately so that the students can connect the image with what you want them to remember.
  • Allow the students to do more prep  before class. Let them find the rule and the law and use a problem method during synchronous sessions where the students work on hypotheticals.
  • Make sure that you explain the learning objectives each week or each module so the students know what they are doing, why, and where it fits in the course. You can even add how the module or unit will help them in practice.
  • You can get information to students with an announcement or email, but consider using a short video, especially if you want to explain an assignment and add more nuance. Make sure to add your personality in to the video. You can also use video to explain information that students find confusing. This way you can avoid answering the same questions over and over again.
  • Use the subtitle or caption feature for your powerpoints when you are recording your asynchronous lecture. 
  • Consider having a transcript of your lecture videos or a detailed outline, especially if you don’t have subtitles or captions in your videos. I don’t write out an outline for my classes, but if you do, you can post that outline.
  • Have some questions for the students to think about while they watch the asynchronous video lecture. I will use Feedback Fruits so students will answer questions while they watch the videos and won’t be able to continue watching until they answer the questions. You could be more low tech and provide them with the question in advance and require them to answer the questions before class in a no or low-stakes quiz.
  • Students seem to prefer short, informal videos to highly produced videos. Students respond better to conversational tones and unedited videos. Of course, don’t just read the slides.
  • Try to avoid talking about dates or current events in your videos, unless it’s really relevant. Make sure the videos can  stand alone as an independent product and don’t refer back to other videos.
  • Disclose your grading rubric early or have students develop a rubric based on what you have communicated. This will help you know whether they understand your materials and your grading standards.
  • Learn from neuroscience- do ungraded short quizzes and spaced repetition before and after class. For a business associations class, for example, you can use old bar questions each week, which will get them familiar with those type of questions.
  • Use some of what works in K-12 teaching about how to keep students engaged, where they empower the students to learn. We focus more on how we perform as teachers vs. how students learn. If you watch YouTube videos of K-12 teachers, you can learn a lot that will also apply to law students.
  • Use non-graded events throughout the semester such as short essays or multiple choice so that they can see how they are doing. Do this anonymously and provide the answers or model answers. 
  • If your class is small enough, greet students by name when they come in the Zoom room.
  • Start each synchronous class with a question in the chat- it can relate to the materials, something in the news, or pop culture etc. If you normally arrive early to the physical classroom, do the same on Zoom and recreate that casual conversation. 
  • Make sure to save the chat in Zoom so that you can refer to issues in the next class or you can send out an email or announcement to discuss what you may have missed in the class.
  • If you have a TA, that person can monitor the chat for you while you're teaching.
  • In the first week, think of creating an exercise that relates to what the students may do  for the final exam. This may include multiples choice, a short essay etc.
  • Have panels of students on call for certain parts of the class, just as you would in residential classes.
  • Try peer-to-peer formative assessment through peer review and team-based learning. This will work better in an online than a residential setting. See my earlier posts for more information on TBL.
  • Take a break in class if it’s more than an hour. Tell the students that they can use that time to take notes, talk with each other etc.
  • Add humor to the course. Consider a contest for best virtual background but be mindful that some students may not have the bandwidth for this. If all of your students can do it, consider a “prize” for the best background.
  • When you use breakout rooms, have a class document that students can fill out or download and then share the screen during the breakout rooms. While they can use a whiteboard in breakout groups, they can’t share their breakout room whiteboard in the main room. You can share using Google docs in Zoom. This may work better if students need to report back to the class.
  • In class, reboot student attention with thumbs up, thumbs down, polls etc. Try to keep things moving every 10-15 minutes.
  • Have students do a short reflection at the end of a unit to discuss what they learned or struggled with. Give them the choice of using video or written format.
  • If  your LMS allows it, have a conditional release system so students cant’t see certain content until they have reached a certain score or milestone with the materials.
  • Use the discussion board feature for students to answer questions and then make sure that you answer within 24 hours.
  • If you choose to use discussion board for substantive student submissions, make sure that you have a clear rubric, with word count requirements etc. Consider having students have a choice of questions to answer. You may decide that if a response does not meet the rubric, the student gets 0 points, so it’s all or nothing. You can also require students to post before they see other posts. If you have a very large class, you can divide them into groups so the students are only looking at a smaller group of posts.
  • Think about providing feedback on assignments via audio or video, if your class is small enough. Many students find that this provides more of a connection to the professor.
  • Early or midway through the semester, use Google forms, survey monkey, or another mechanisms for students to let you know anonymously what's working and what’s not. Ask them what you should start, stop, and continue doing.
  • Send personal emails when a student misses class. Just asking if the student is ok and making sure s/he knows where to find the class recording, can further the sense of community and connection.
  • At the end of the semester, have the students assess themselves. They can also discuss three takeaways from the course and how they plan to use it in practice.

Best of luck planning for the new semester. Stay safe!

 

 

August 2, 2020 in Conferences, Law School, Marcia Narine Weldon, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (1)

Monday, July 6, 2020

What is a Merger Anyway?

The title of this post is the title of a panel discussion I organized for the 2019 Business Law Prof Blog symposium, held back in September of last year.  (Readers may recall that I posted on this session back at the time, under the same title.)  The panel experience was indescribably satisfying for me.  It represented one of those moments in life where one just feels so lucky . . . .

Why?  Because it fulfilled a dream, of sorts, that I have had for quite a while.  Here's the story.

About ten years ago, I ended up in a conversation with two of my beloved Tennessee Law colleagues while we were grabbing afternoon beverages.  One of these colleagues is a tax geek; the other is a property guy.  Somehow, we got into a discussion about mergers and acquisitions.  I was asked how I would define a merger as a matter of corporate law, and part of my answer (that mergers are magic) got these two folks all riled up (in a professional, academic, nerdy way).  The conversation included some passionate exchanges.  It was an exhilerating experience.

I have remembered that exchange for all of these years, vowing to myself that some day, I would work on publishing what was said.  When the opportunity arose to hold a panel discussion to recreate our water-cooler chat at the symposium last fall, I jumped at the chance.  I was tickled pink that my two colleagues consented to join me in the recreation exercise.  They are good sports, wise lawyers, and excellent teachers.

My objective in convening the panel was two-fold.  

First, I thought that students would find the conversation illuminating.  "Aha," they might justifiably say.  "Now I know why I am confused about what a merger is.  It's because the term means different things to different lawyers, all of whom may have a role in advising on a business combination transaction.  I have to understand the perspective from which the question is being asked, and the purpose of answering the question, before I can definitively say what a merger is."  Overall, I was convinced that a recreation of the conversation through a panel discussion could be a solid teaching tool.

But that's not all.  Faculty also can earn from our dialogue.  It helped me in my teaching to know how my tax colleague (who teaches transactional tax planning and business taxation) and my property colleague (who teaches property and secured transactions) define the concept of a merger and what each had to say about his definition as it operates in practice.  I like to think my two colleagues similarly benefitted from an understanding of my definition of a merger (even if neither believes in statutory magic) . . . .

Now, you and your students also can benefit from the panel.  Although it is not quite as good as hearing us all talk about mergers and acquisitions in person (which one can do here), Transactions: The Tennessee Journal of Business Law, recently published an edited transcript of the panel discussion as part of the symposium proceedings.  It also is titled "What is a Merger Anyway?"  And you can find it here.  (The entire volume of the journal that includes the symposium proceedings can be found here.  Your friends from the BLPB are the featured authors!)  I am sure that your joy in reading it cannot match my joy in contributing to the project, but I hope you find joy in reading it nonetheless.

July 6, 2020 in Business Associations, Conferences, Corporate Finance, Corporations, Joan Heminway, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (1)

Monday, June 22, 2020

Teaching Through the Pandemic - Part IV

Thanks to all of our readers who were able to come to the National Business Law Scholars Conference (NBLSC) last Thursday and Friday.  It was lovely to see so many of you there, even though it was somewhat sad that we could not be with each other in person.  The conference enjoyed record participation, and we have received a lot of useful informal feedback about our virtual format from folks who attended.

I was the beneficiary of many "teaching moments" in hosting and participating in the NBLSC this year.  I later will post on some of the outtakes from the NBLSC teaching panel (to which co-blogger Marcia Narine Weldon--who blogged about teaching on Friday--contributed meaningfully).  Today, however, I am focusing my post on a few new things my fellow UT Law conference hosts and I learned about Zoom in the process of hosting the conference.  A list follows.  

  • Although meeting participants should mute themselves on entering a meeting, it is best for a meeting host to set up the meeting so that all participants will be muted on entry, especially for large meetings.  It can be challenging to track down and mute participants who join a meeting and bring background noise or conversations into a meeting that is already in progress.
  • If you have set up a Zoom meeting with yourself as the host and you hand off the hosting to another meeting participant during the meeting, you may leave the meeting without ending the meeting for all.  However, you cannot then initiate a second meeting as host until the first meeting has concluded.  You cannot, in other words, host two concurrent meetings, even if you handed off hosting in the first meeting to someone else.  See here.  (Fix?  Set up someone else as an alternative host of the first meeting.  Also have that alternative host start the first meeting as host.  Join the first meeting as a participant.  Sign off any time and initiate the second meeting.)
  • If you are hosting a meeting, consider assigning someone as a co-host so that, if your Internet connection fails, the meeting continues to proceed with the co-host as host until you can re-join.  This was particularly welcome to me, since my power went out three separate times on Friday afternoon during conference sessions I was hosting.
  • Have a telephone or data-enabled smart pad handy as a back-up connection device if you are hosting or participating in a Zoom meeting on a computer using the Zoom client.  Although data rates may apply, you can easily reconnect using the Zoom app on your phone or smart pad if you lose your Internet connection.  (This is how I reconnected those three times on Friday.)
  • If the meeting host allows all participants to share screens at the outset of the meeting, if a presenter who is sharing slides drops out of the meeting because of, e.g., Internet hiccups, the presenter can immediately re-share the slides after re-joining the meeting (without having to be named as a host or co-host). A meeting host would not want to allow all participants to share screens, however, unless the participants are trusted.
  • A host can kick a participant out of a meeting, but that participant can re-enter the meeting room unless the "Allow removed participants to rejoin" feature is disabled.
  • A meeting host can report an aberrant user to Zoom if that feature ("Report participants to Zoom") is enabled in the host's settings.
  • Some meeting participants like to communicate with other meeting participants privately through the chat feature of Zoom.  See here.  It approximates sitting next to (or close to) others in a physical room.  If you want to allow this kind of background chatter, enable "Allow meeting participants to send a private 1:1 message to another participant" in your profile settings on Zoom.
  • Although I did not use them for the NBLSC, meeting hosts should consider the desirability of using waiting rooms, password requirements, meeting locks and other security features, and breakout rooms to manage participants. 

I am sure there is more I could say, but these were the main things I learned that were not necessarily things I had picked up in establishing and engaging Zoom meetings for classroom activities.  While some of the above-listed items may be of limited utility in using Zoom to teach online (as opposed to using Zoom to host a two-day, 31-meeting conference), if you substitute "class" for "meeting" in the listed items, you can get a sense of how some of them may apply to class activities in general or in specific circumstances, too.  In any event, i have come to the understanding that we all can benefit from knowing as much as possible about the technologies were are using as we continue to navigate the virtual conference and online teaching waters as business law professors.

June 22, 2020 in Conferences, Joan Heminway, Marcia Narine Weldon, Teaching, Technology | Permalink | Comments (2)

Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Tomorrow: 2020 National Business Law Scholars Conference

Just a quick reminder that the 2020 National Business Law Scholars Conference--the 11th annual conference and our first virtual conference--begins tomorrow morning at 9:00 am EDT and extends through Friday afternoon at 4:30 pm EDT.  The conference schedule is available here.  Even if your workday is full, think about joining us (with or without a beverage) for some business law fellowship at 6:15 pm EDT tomorrow during our virtual happy hour.

Please make sure that you have upgraded your Zoom client to Zoom 5.0 before attempting to join in from your computer.  Effective as of June 1, Zoom is no longer supporting earlier versions.  If you have questions about upgrading, check out this page from the Zoom Support Center.

We hope to see many of you there!

June 17, 2020 in Conferences, Joan Heminway | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, June 15, 2020

2020 National Business Law Scholars Conference Schedule!

The full schedule for the 2020 National Business Law Scholars Conference, which is being hosted on Zoom Thursday and Friday of this week, is now available.  You can find it here.  If and as additional changes are necessary, we will re-post.

As is always the case, the conference includes folks presenting work in a variety of areas of business law.  These traditional paper panels are the heart of the conference.  In addition, as I noted in my post last week, we are including three plenary sessions--one on "Business Law in the COVID-19 Era," one reflecting on teaching business law in the current environment, and one on current bankruptcy law and practice issues.  There is something for almost everyone in the business law space in the conference program.

I am pleased and proud to note that several of my fellow bloggers from the Business Law Prof Blog are participating in the conference this year.  They include (in addition to me): Colleen Baker, Ben Edwards, Ann Lipton, and Marcia Narine Weldon.  I hope many of you will join us for all or part of the program and offer comments to colleagues on and relating to their work.

June 15, 2020 in Ann Lipton, Colleen Baker, Conferences, Joan Heminway, Marcia Narine Weldon | Permalink | Comments (4)

Monday, June 8, 2020

2020 National Business Law Scholars Conference - Virtual Conference June 18-19

The 2020 National Business Law Scholars Conference will be hosted on Zoom on Thursday, June 18 and Friday, June 19.  Conference sessions include paper panels covering a variety of areas of business law and plenary sessions on several current topics of interest.  As is true for the in-person conference, no registration fee is required for attendance.

The conference will begin on Thursday at 9:00 am EDT with a plenary Q&A session entitled "Business Law in the COVID-19 Era" (focusing on the ways in which Business Law has impacted and been impacted by the pandemic in various academic and practice settings).  Thursday's formal proceedings end with a second plenary Q&A session at 4:45 pm EDT, "Teaching Business Law: Applying What We Learned from Emergency Remote Teaching During the Pandemic," featuring doctrinal and experiential (including clinical) business law faculty reflecting on their recent experiences teaching remotely on an emergency basis and the lessons learned from that experience that inform future teaching.  An informal virtual cocktail hour follows that program, beginning at approximately 6:15 pm EDT.

Friday’s sessions begin at 9:00 am EDT and end at 4:30 pm EDT.  The final program of the day is a plenary panel on "Bankruptcy and COVID-19" that begins at 3:00 pm EDT.  This panel includes judicial, practical, and academic perspectives an bankruptcy law changes, challenges, and opportunities during and related to the pandemic.

The full schedule for the conference with assigned Zoom meeting rooms will be available later this week or early next week.  A link will be posted here and shared on social media.  Although the networking opportunities will not be quite the same in the virtual format, the Planning Committee (listed below) is looking forward to a vibrant conference filled with significant opportunities to promote and forward valuable business law scholarship, teaching, and service.

2020 National Business Law Scholars Planning Committee
 
Afra Afsharipour (University of California, Davis, School of Law)
Tony Casey (The University of Chicago Law School)
Eric C. Chaffee (The University of Toledo College of Law)
Steven Davidoff Solomon (University of California, Berkeley School of Law)
Joan MacLeod Heminway (The University of Tennessee College of Law)
Kristin N. Johnson (Tulane University Law School)
Elizabeth Pollman (University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School)
Jeff Schwartz (University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law)
Megan Wischmeier Shaner (University of Oklahoma College of Law)

June 8, 2020 in Conferences, Joan Heminway | Permalink | Comments (1)

Monday, June 1, 2020

2021 AALS Annual Meeting - Section on Securities Regulation Calls for Papers

The AALS Section on Securities Regulation distributed two calls for papers earlier today.
Both are included below.

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AALS Call for Papers:
What Can Securities Regulation Contribute to
Environmental Law, and Vice Versa?

The AALS Sections on Environmental Law and Securities Regulation are delighted to present a joint session at the 2021 AALS Annual Meeting, titled “What Can Securities Regulation Contribute to Environmental Law, and Vice Versa?” We are awaiting final scheduling information from AALS, but we anticipate receiving a three-hour joint program slot. We are planning an innovative format that will include short (5-7 minute) paper presentations in plenary session, followed by collaboration in “table discussion” groups.

The political vicissitudes of environmental policy in recent years have led to increased focus on the potential of private mechanisms to achieve environmental results that had traditionally been sought by government action. At the same time, investors and market regulators have become increasingly aware of the need for corporations to grapple with environmental risks, particularly with respect to global climate disruption.

This joint session will bring together leading scholars from the fields of environmental and securities law to discuss the reciprocal influences that environmental and securities law exert on each other, including a discussion of the following questions: How do the goals of securities regulation intersect with environmental policy? Are the securities laws an effective means of advancing environmental policy? What are the regulatory implications, both for securities regulation and environmental law, of this intersection? What are innovative investors and companies doing in response to the risks of climate change?

We invite papers that explore these questions from a diversity of perspectives, both theoretical and applied. The authors of the selected papers will present short, TED-style talks at the 2021 Annual Meeting and engage in dialogue with each other and attendees about the ideas presented.

By August 15, 2020, please send your submission to Professor Steve Gold at stgold@law.rutgers.edu and Professor Wendy Couture at wgcouture@uidaho.edu. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. The authors of the selected papers will be notified by September 15, 2020. 

The Call for Paper presenters will be responsible for paying their registration fee and travel expenses.  Please note that AALS anticipates that the Annual Meeting will proceed in person as planned in San Francisco, (https://am.aals.org/), and the theme is The Power of Words.

AALS Call for Papers:
Emerging Voices in Securities Regulation

The AALS Section on Securities Regulation is delighted to bring together junior and senior securities regulation scholars for the purpose of providing junior scholars feedback on their scholarship and helping them prepare their work for submission for publication. Junior scholars’ presentations of their drafts will be followed by comments from senior scholars and further audience discussion.

If you would like to present your draft as a junior scholar, by August 15, 2020, please send your draft to Professor Wendy Couture at wgcouture@uidaho.edu. We welcome submissions at any stage of development, although preference may be given to more fully developed papers over abstracts and paper proposals. The authors of the selected papers will be notified by September 15, 2020. 

If you would like to volunteer to provide feedback as a more senior scholar, please let Professor Couture know, at wgcouture@uidaho.edu, by August 15, 2020. Thank you in advance for your generosity.

The Call for Paper presenters will be responsible for paying their registration fee and travel expenses.  Please note that AALS anticipates that the Annual Meeting will proceed in person as planned in San Francisco, (https://am.aals.org/), and the theme is The Power of Words.

June 1, 2020 in Call for Papers, Conferences, Joan Heminway, Securities Regulation | Permalink | Comments (0)

2021 AALS Annual Meeting - Section on Agency, Etc. Call for Papers

Call for Papers
AALS Section on Agency, Partnership, LLCs & Unincorporated Associations 

Entrepreneurship and the Entity 

January 5-9, 2021, AALS Annual Meeting 

The AALS Section on Agency, Partnership, LLCs & Unincorporated Associations will sponsor a panel on “Entrepreneurship and the Entity” at the 2021 AALS Annual Meeting in San Francisco, California. This panel will showcase scholarship on subjects relating to business law and entrepreneurship, including entity choice throughout a company’s evolution, financing alternatives, and how legal rules promote and discourage different kinds of entrepreneurship. Scholars are encouraged to interpret the subject of the Call for Papers broadly and creatively. 

SUBMISSION PROCEDURE: Scholars should send a summary of a work or a work-in-progress of no more than 600 words to Professor Sarah C. Haan at haans@wlu.edu on or before Friday, August 21, 2020. The summary should be a pdf or Word document that has been stripped of information identifying the author; only the cover email should connect the author to the submission. The subject line of the email should read: “Submission—[author name & title].” Papers will be selected through an anonymous review by the Section’s Executive Committee. 

SPECIAL NOTE: Interested parties are encouraged to submit even if they are not certain at this time that they will attend the AALS Annual Meeting in person. 

ELIGIBILITY: Scholars at AALS member law schools are eligible to submit. Pursuant to AALS rules, faculty at fee-paid non-member law schools, foreign faculty, adjunct and visiting faculty (without a full-time position at an AALS member law school), graduate students, fellows, and non-law school faculty are not eligible to submit. Please note that all program presenters are responsible for paying their own annual meeting registration fees and, for those attending the AALS Annual Meeting in person, travel expenses. 

Any inquiries about the Call for Papers should be submitted to: Professor Sarah C. Haan at haans@wlu.edu. 

June 1, 2020 in Agency, Call for Papers, Conferences, Entrepreneurship, Joan Heminway, LLCs, Partnership | Permalink | Comments (0)

Tuesday, May 26, 2020

2021 AALS Annual Meeting - Section on Business Associations Additional Call for Papers

Yesterday, I posted the AALS Section on Business Associations Call for Papers for the New Voices in Business Law program.  Today, I am posting the section's general call for papers, which focuses on a very salient topic: Corporate Boards in the Age of COVID-19.  There certainly is a lot that we can say about that from the advisory, compliance, and litigation (prevention and management) angles.

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Call for Papers for the
Section on Business Associations Program on
Corporate Boards in the Age of COVID-19

2021 AALS Annual Meeting

The AALS Section on Business Associations is pleased to announce a Call for Papers for its program at the 2021 AALS Annual Meeting in San Francisco, California. The topic is Corporate Boards in the Age of COVID-19. Up to three presenters will be selected for the section’s program.

The COVID-19 pandemic has put corporate boards under tremendous stress. In the midst of unprecedented financial and operational challenges, boards must comply with legal obligations that are often complex, uncertain, and contested. This panel will explore the impact of COVID-19 on the corporate board. How should boards exercise their oversight and disclosure responsibilities during these times? Should boards reevaluate the corporate purpose, especially considering the increased vulnerability of employees and other stakeholders? Should boards rethink their dividends and stock buyback policies? And, as market instability continues, how should boards approach planned transactions and use defensive mechanisms? We hope to facilitate a robust conversation that connects corporate law theory to the immediate challenges facing corporate boards.

Submission Information:

Please submit an abstract or a draft of an unpublished paper to Jessica Ericsson, jerickso@richmond.edu, on or before August 3, 2020. Authors should include their name and contact information in their submission email but remove all identifying information from their submission.

Papers will be selected after review by members of the Executive Committee of the Section. Authors of selected papers will be notified by August 28, 2020. Presenters will be responsible for paying their registration fee, hotel, and travel expenses.

Please direct any questions to Jessica Erickson, University of Richmond School of Law, at jerickso@richmond.edu.

May 26, 2020 in Business Associations, Call for Papers, Conferences, Joan Heminway | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 25, 2020

2021 AALS Annual Meeting - Section on Business Associations Call for Papers

Call for Papers

AALS Section on Business Associations

New Voices in Business Law

January 5-9, 2021, AALS Annual Meeting

The AALS Section on Business Associations is pleased to announce a “New Voices in Business Law” program during the 2021 AALS Annual Meeting in San Francisco, California. This works-in-progress program will bring together junior and senior scholars in the field of business law for the purpose of providing junior scholars with feedback and guidance on their draft articles.

FORMAT:  Scholars whose papers are selected will provide a brief overview of their paper, and participants will then break into simultaneous roundtables dedicated to the individual papers.  Two senior scholars will provide commentary and lead the discussion about each paper.

SUBMISSION PROCEDURE:  Junior scholars who are interested in participating in the program should send a draft or summary of at least five pages to Professor Megan Shaner at mshaner@ou.edu on or before Friday, August 21, 2020.  The cover email should state the junior scholar’s institution, tenure status, number of years in their current position, whether the paper has been accepted for publication, and, if not, when the scholar anticipates submitting the article to law reviews.  The subject line of the email should read: “Submission—Business Associations WIP Program.”

Junior scholars whose papers are selected for the program will need to submit a draft to the senior scholar commentators by December 16, 2020.

ELIGIBILITY:  Junior scholars at AALS member law schools are eligible to submit papers.  “Junior scholars” include untenured faculty who have been teaching full-time at a law school for ten or fewer years.  The Committee will give priority to papers that have not yet been accepted for publication or submitted to law reviews. 

Pursuant to AALS rules, faculty at fee-paid non-member law schools, foreign faculty, adjunct and visiting faculty (without a full-time position at an AALS member law school), graduate students, fellows, and non-law school faculty are not eligible to submit.  Please note that all presenters at the program are responsible for paying their own annual meeting registration fees and travel expenses.

May 25, 2020 in Call for Papers, Conferences, Joan Heminway | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, May 18, 2020

National Business Law Scholars 2020 - Update; Virtual Workshop

This post updates my March 23 post on the 2020 National Business Law Scholars Conference.

After much deliberation, the planning committee for the National Business Law Scholars Conference has determined to cancel this year’s in-person event and instead host a virtual workshop on the original scheduled conference dates (June 18-19).  The workshop will consist of moderated paper panels featuring the work of those who submitted proposals for the 2020 conference and desire to participate. We also hope to host a discussion session focusing on online teaching and perhaps one or more feature programs on business law in the COVID-19 era.  

Each registrant for the 2020 conference who submitted an accepted proposal will receive a message in short order asking whether they want to participate in the virtual conference.  Relatively rapid responses to this query will be requested.  A workshop schedule, together with related logistics information will be constructed from those responses and circulated to participants.

As you may recall, the conference this year was scheduled to be held at The University of Tennessee College of Law.  We plan to hold the 2021 National Business Law Scholars Conference at UT Law in Knoxville next June.  We will determine the exact dates for next year's conference in the coming months.  

All of us on the planning committee (listed below) are grateful to all who registered for this year's conference for their patience as we considered options and made the determination to "go virtual."  We look forward to getting everyone together in person next year when we anticipate that conditions will be more safe and stable.  We know that health and safety are paramount for all.  We also know that business law scholars engage in productive discussions that push each other's work forward when we join forces.  We understand that electronic communication is no substitute for an in-person event, but we hope that our 2020 virtual forum responds adequately to both health and safety concerns and the desire to engage with and advance business law research and writing until we can next get together in the same physical place.

Afra Afsharipour (University of California, Davis, School of Law)
Tony Casey (The University of Chicago Law School)
Eric C. Chaffee (The University of Toledo College of Law)
Steven Davidoff Solomon (University of California, Berkeley School of Law)
Joan MacLeod Heminway (The University of Tennessee College of Law)
Kristin N. Johnson (Tulane University Law School)
Elizabeth Pollman (University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School)
Jeff Schwartz (University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law)
Megan Wischmeier Shaner (University of Oklahoma College of Law)

May 18, 2020 in Conferences, Joan Heminway | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Academy of Legal Studies in Business (ALSB) Virtual Conference - Call for Participation

Details for the ALSB Annual Conference are here

The organization is primarily geared toward law faculty who teach in business schools, but we have presenters from practice and law school faculties from time to time as well.

The call for participation deadline is June 1, 2020.  And the virtual conference will be held August 2-7, 2020.

May 14, 2020 in Business School, Call for Papers, Conferences, Haskell Murray | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, April 2, 2020

Notice of Postponement - Emory Transactional Law and Skills Education Conference

Please note the following regarding the postponement of the biennial conference at Emory law, previously posted and promoted on the BLPB here:

Due to the uncertain length of the COVID-19 global pandemic, and out of an abundance of caution, we have decided to cancel the Transactional Law and Skills Education Conference currently scheduled for June 5-6, 2020. 

We will re-schedule the Conference and revisit our theme – “Hindsight, Insight, and Foresight: Transactional Law and Skills Education in the 2020s” – when it is appropriate and safe to do so.

If you have already registered for the Conference, we will refund your money.  If you have submitted a proposal or a nomination for the Tina L. Stark Award for Teaching Excellence, you will have the opportunity to resubmit your proposal or nomination when we establish the new Conference date. 

If you have already reserved a room at the Emory Conference Center Hotel please call them at 800.933.6679 to cancel your reservation.  For other Conference-related questions, please contact our Conference Coordinator, Kelli Pittman at kelli.pittman@emory.edu.

During this period of “social distancing,” we are proud to be members of a community of transactional law and skills educators dedicated to excellence.  We look forward to re-scheduling the Conference and welcoming you back to Emory.

April 2, 2020 in Conferences, Joan Heminway, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, March 30, 2020

2020 SEALS Conference - Update

Here is the latest on this summer's annual conference for the Southeastern Association of Law Schools (SEALS), scheduled for July 30 - August 5 at the Marriott Fort Lauderdale, from SEALS Executive Director Russ Weaver:

Dear Deans, Program Committee members and SEALS friends,

First, and foremost, I hope that everyone is staying well and adjusting to the new normal in legal education (with all classes being taught online).

Second, I want to let you know that SEALS’ Board of Trustees is meeting regularly to assess how to move forward on this summer’s meeting. At this point, the situation is uncertain and no decision has been made. However, the Board is meeting regularly and constantly assessing/reassessing the situation. As the situation becomes clearer, we will be making further announcements.

Third, I also want to let you know that, in order to ensure that no attendee is placed in a difficult situation, SEALS has moved the registration cancellation date back to July 1st. In other words, you can cancel your registration and receive a full refund through July 1st. Hopefully, by that time, we will be able to more accurately assess whether our meeting will go forward and in what form.

In the meantime, please stay safe!

Russell L. Weaver
Professor of Law & Distinguished University Scholar
University of Louisville
Louis D. Brandeis School of Law
Louisville, KY 40292
Email: russ.weaver@louisville.edu
PH: (502) 852-6559
FAX: (502) 852-0862

I currently serve as an officer of SEALS.  Fee free to contact Russ, me, or any SEALS officer or board member if you have any questions.

March 30, 2020 in Conferences, Joan Heminway | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, March 23, 2020

2020 National Business Law Scholars Conference - CFP Deadline Extended

This follows on my post from last week regarding the 2020 National Business Law Scholars Conference, scheduled for June 18-19, 2020 at The University of Tennessee College of Law.  The planning committee conferred a few days ago and, in recognition of the current state of affairs, determined to extend the deadline for paper submissions to Friday, April 24.  We hope that this takes some pressure off faculty who would like to submit a paper for inclusion in the conference but are wrestling with new challenges and stressors in transitioning to teaching online.

Again, please contact me at jheminwa@tennessee.edu or any other member of the planing committee listed below with questions.  Eric Chaffee handles paper submissions and scheduling.  Accordingly, he is the best person to contact if you need to address specific submission issues or scheduling constraints.  His email address is eric.chaffee@utoledo.edu.

Afra Afsharipour (University of California, Davis, School of Law)
Tony Casey (The University of Chicago Law School)
Eric C. Chaffee (The University of Toledo College of Law)
Steven Davidoff Solomon (University of California, Berkeley School of Law)
Joan MacLeod Heminway (The University of Tennessee College of Law)
Kristin N. Johnson (Tulane University Law School)
Elizabeth Pollman (University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School)
Jeff Schwartz (University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law)
Megan Wischmeier Shaner (University of Oklahoma College of Law)

March 23, 2020 in Call for Papers, Conferences, Joan Heminway | Permalink | Comments (2)

Monday, March 16, 2020

2020 National Business Law Scholars Conference - CFP Deadline in Two Weeks!

Thanks to all who have been registering and submitting papers for this year's National Business Law Scholars Conference, scheduled for June 18-19 at The University of Tennessee College of Law.  I posted on the conference last month.  The conference planning committee, like so many others, is monitoring the COVID-19 situation.  At present, the conference is still a "go," and we remain excited about it!

The deadline for paper submissions is March 31.  We hope that you are inspired to submit.  The conference website can be found here.  The planning committee understands that many (most?) of us are currently subject to institutionally imposed travel restrictions.  Please know that if you submit a paper and are unable to attend due to travel restrictions, you may withdraw your paper.

Comments can be left here, or feel free to email me or any other planning committee member for more information.  Paper submission questions are best directed to Eric Chaffee.  The planning committee members are listed again below, for your convenience.

Afra Afsharipour (University of California, Davis, School of Law)
Tony Casey (The University of Chicago Law School)
Eric C. Chaffee (The University of Toledo College of Law)
Steven Davidoff Solomon (University of California, Berkeley School of Law)
Joan MacLeod Heminway (The University of Tennessee College of Law)
Kristin N. Johnson (Tulane University Law School)
Elizabeth Pollman (University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School)
Jeff Schwartz (University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law)
Megan Wischmeier Shaner (University of Oklahoma College of Law)

March 16, 2020 in Call for Papers, Conferences, Joan Heminway | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, February 24, 2020

National Business Law Scholars Conference 2020 @ The University of Tennessee College of Law

National Business Law Scholars Conference (NBLSC)

June 18-19, 2020

Call for Papers

The National Business Law Scholars Conference (NBLSC) will be held on Thursday and Friday, June 18-19, 2020, at The University of Tennessee College of Law.

This is the eleventh meeting of the NBLSC, an annual conference that draws legal scholars from across the United States and around the world. We welcome all scholarly submissions relating to business law. Junior scholars and those considering entering the academy are especially encouraged to participate. If you are thinking about entering the academy and would like to receive informal mentoring and learn more about job market dynamics, please let us know when you make your submission.

Please use the conference website to submit an abstract or paper by March 31, 2020.  If you have any questions, concerns, or special requests regarding the schedule, please email Professor Eric C. Chaffee at eric.chaffee@utoledo.edu. We will respond to submissions with notifications of acceptance shortly after the deadline. We anticipate the conference schedule will be circulated in May.

Conference Organizers:

Afra Afsharipour (University of California, Davis, School of Law)
Tony Casey (The University of Chicago Law School)
Eric C. Chaffee (The University of Toledo College of Law)
Steven Davidoff Solomon (University of California, Berkeley School of Law)
Joan MacLeod Heminway (The University of Tennessee College of Law)
Kristin N. Johnson (Tulane University Law School)
Elizabeth Pollman (University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School)
Jeff Schwartz (University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law)
Megan Wischmeier Shaner (University of Oklahoma College of Law)

February 24, 2020 in Call for Papers, Conferences, Joan Heminway | Permalink | Comments (0)

Sunday, February 9, 2020

2020 ALSB Annual and Regional Conferences

At this point, we’re a bit past the New Year, but you might still be thinking about the conferences you’ll attend in 2020, right?  Here are some great ideas:   

The Academy of Legal Studies in Business has a great annual conference in early August.  This year it’s in Providence, Rhode Island, August 4-8, 2020.  I’ve never been to Providence, but I hear it’s lovely.  I can’t wait! 

The Academy also has a number of regional conferences.  Check out all the options (if I missed one, send me an email)!

Canadian ALSB Annual Conference April 30-May 2, 2020 (Toronto, Canada)

Great Lakes ALSB, Fall 2020 (Grand Rapids area, Michigan – check back for more info)

Mid-Atlantic Academy of Legal Studies in Business, April 23-25, 2020 (Atlantic City, NJ)

Mid-West Academy of Legal Studies in Business, March 26-27, 2020 (Chicago, Illinois)

North Atlantic Regional Business Law Association Annual Conference, April 4, 2020 (Easton, Massachusetts)

North East Academy of Legal Studies in Business, May 1-3, 2020 (Lakeville, Connecticut)

Pacific Northwest Academy of Legal Studies in Business, April 23-25, 2020 (Vancouver, Canada)

Pacific Southwest Academy of Legal Studies in Business, February 13-16, 2020 (Palm Springs, California)

Rocky Mountain Academy of Legal Studies in Business, September 25-26, 2020 (Vail, Colorado)

Southern Academy of Legal Studies in Business, March 5-7, 2020 (San Antonio, Texas)

Southeastern Academy of Legal Studies in Business [check back for 2020 updates]

Western Academy of Legal Studies in Business, March 27-29, 2020 (Lake Tahoe)

February 9, 2020 in Call for Papers, Colleen Baker, Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0)