Friday, March 1, 2019

Loyola University Chicago School of Law is seeking applications for Co-Director of the Business Law Clinic/ Executive Director of the Business Law Center

The Business Law Clinic (Clinic) is part of a comprehensive curriculum in transactional law that is comprised of the Clinic, the Business Law Center (Center) and certificate and degree conferring programs. The Clinic, established in 1999, offers students a unique opportunity to develop essential lawyering skills in a professional, interactive environment. Loyola seeks a dynamic Clinic Co-Director/Center Executive Director to work collaboratively with the Clinic Co-Director and the Director of the Business Law Center to provide strategic leadership, teach the Clinic class, supervise student work with clients, and to assist the Center Director in the development of the business and transactional law curriculum, scholarly conferences and programming.

The Co-Director/Executive Director will serve as the Randy L. and Melvin R. Berlin Clinical Professor of Law that is a presumptively renewable long-term contract position with voting privileges within the Loyola University Chicago School of Law. Loyola University Chicago School of Law is a student-focused law center inspired by the Jesuit tradition of academic excellence, intellectual openness, and service to others. Our mission is to educate diverse, talented students to be responsible leaders in a rapidly changing, interdependent world, to prepare graduates who will be ethical advocates for justice and the rule of law, and to contribute to a deeper understanding of law and legal institutions through a commitment to research, scholarship and public service.

The Clinic is a focal point of student development of essential lawyering skills in a professional, interactive live-client environment. Students work under the direct supervision of the Co-Directors to represent entrepreneurs and small business owners, as well as individuals who are seeking legal assistance with not-for-profit organizations. The not-for-profit clients represented by the Clinic include organizations that encompass animal welfare, sports clubs, museums, community organizations, religious organizations, etc. The for-profit clients are entrepreneurs, inventors, service providers, and web-based business owners who are involved in a variety of industries. The Clinic Co-Directors work collaboratively to provide supervision and professional oversight of the work completed by law student clinicians in addition to teaching the Clinic classroom component. Business Law Center The Center is the hub for School of Law’s curriculum, research and programming related to business and transactional law. The Center is led by a nationally and internationally renowned Director that is a full-time tenured faculty member along with other esteemed scholars in business law. The Center Director works in close collaboration with the Business Law Clinic to ensure that students have access to a full and wide breadth of educational opportunities and programs.

The Center is a part of larger initiatives across the University, the Quinlan School of Business and the Chicago community that seek to implement Loyola’s social justice mission as it relates to providing access to business ventures and initiatives to underserved and minority communities. The Center includes the Institute for Investor Protection, The Rooftops Project, the JD Certificate in Transactional Law, and the Master of Laws (LLM) in Business Law degree.

Position Essential Duties and Responsibilities: The duties and responsibilities of the Co-Director/Executive Director include, but are not limited to the following: Strategic planning for the future direction of the Clinic for continued growth and development; Serve as the external advocate and collaborator for the Clinic in its work with the Center, the Quinlan School of Business and other community partnerships; Assist in the administration of the Clinic and the development of the Center; Supervision of law students, summer interns, and fellows in skill development and client representation including supervising students in client meetings, drafting contracts and other legal documents, conducting legal research, determining client legal issues, and advising and counseling clients; Teach and assist in the development of curriculum as part of the classroom component for the Clinic, the Transactional Law Certificate and the LLM in Business Law; Mentor and act as faculty advisor to student members of the Business Law Society; Assist the Center Director in organizing conferences, workshops and seminars in business and transactional law; and Engaging in scholarly research (preferred but not required).

Qualifications: The candidate must have the ability to engage successfully and work collaboratively with a diverse group of stakeholders including the Clinic Co-Director, the Center Director, students, clients, administrators, and community members. Excellent judgment, including sensitivity to the needs of clients, cultural nuances and confidential information. A commitment to serving not-for-profit clients and underserved and minority communities. Experience as a clinician or former clinical teaching fellow in a business/transactional law clinic or as a lawyer with significant practice experience in business law. Ability to work independently with minimal supervision and as part of an interprofessional team. Demonstrated commitment to detail and a process-oriented approach to supervision of clinic work. Demonstrated ability to organize and manage conferences, workshops and seminars. Flexible work attitude, ability to work effectively in a fast-paced environment with a small staff and frequent student turnover (due to semester long courses and graduation). Bachelor's degree and a JD from an ABA accredited law school degree required. Admission/eligibility for admission to the Illinois Bar. Adept user of internet, case management systems, e-mail and other office automation systems.

Selection Process: Review of applications will begin March 1, 2019 and continue until the position is filled. The position will begin on July 1, 2019. Applicants are to submit (1) a letter of interest describing the candidate’s reasons for applying for the position, (2) a curriculum vitae, (3) samples of scholarly or other written work if available, and (4) the names and contact information of three individuals prepared to provide professional references. Applications should be submitted through Loyola’s Careers website at https://www.careers.luc.edu/postings/10391. Inquiries should be directed to Professor Steven A. Ramirez, Director of Business Law Center, Loyola University Chicago, 25 E. Pearson, Chicago, IL, 60611, sramirez3@luc.edu.

Loyola University Chicago is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer with a strong commitment to hiring for our mission and diversifying our faculty. As a Jesuit Catholic institution of higher education, we seek candidates who will contribute to our strategic plan to deliver a Transformative Education in the Jesuit tradition. To learn more about LUC’s mission, candidates should consult our website at www.luc.edu/mission/. Applications from women, minorities, veterans, and persons with disabilities are especially encouraged and preference will be given to candidates who can mentor female law students and those from communities that are underrepresented in the legal profession. Candidates are encouraged to consult our website to gain a clearer understanding of Loyola's mission at www.luc.edu/mission/index.shtml and our focus on transformative education at www.luc.edu/transformativeed/.

March 1, 2019 in Clinical Education, Jobs, Law School, Lawyering, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, January 28, 2019

Visiting Clinical Assistant Professor, BU/MIT Startup Law Clinic (Boston University School of Law)

Boston University School of Law is seeking to hire a full-time attorney in its Startup Law Clinic (the “Clinic”). The Clinic is part of BU Law’s Entrepreneurship, Intellectual Property, and Cyberlaw Program, which is a unique collaboration between BU Law and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The Clinic represents current students at MIT and BU on matters related to a wide range of legal issues faced by early-stage business ventures. The attorney would be expected to help law students counsel clients and represent students in transactional settings. Clients often present questions of law involving for-profit and nonprofit entity formation, allocations of equity, startup financing, employment and independent contractor issues, ownership of intellectual property, privacy policies, terms of service and other third-party contractual relationships, and trademark and copyright matters. Experience representing startup ventures is considered a plus.

The attorney’s primary responsibility will be to supervise and assist students with direct client representation matters. The attorney will also assist the Clinic Director and Assistant Director in preparing and teaching a year-long seminar for students enrolled in the Clinic, including developing materials, performing research, and coordinating classroom activities and guest presentations. The position is a year-round position and the attorney also would work with student fellows hired to continue the work of the clinic during the summer. As time allows, the attorney would also work with the Clinic Director and Assistant Director to develop generalized legal resources and informational material to inform MIT and BU students on the legal aspects of forming and operating for-profit and nonprofit entities.

The ideal candidate is a member of the Massachusetts bar or is eligible for membership via admission by motion, with at least two years of experience advising clients in a transactional setting, and a willingness to support the work of creative and innovative young clients. Teaching experience or a strong interest in developing as a clinical faculty member is also considered a plus. Exceptional writing, editing, organizational, and managerial skills are required.

The attorney will be hired as a Visiting Clinical Assistant Professor to a two-year contract. The ideal start date is May 28, 2019 or sooner.

Boston University School of Law is committed to faculty diversity and welcomes expressions of interest from diverse applicants.

For more information, see here.

January 28, 2019 in Clinical Education, Entrepreneurship, Joan Heminway, Jobs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, October 23, 2017

Notre Dame Law Seeks Director for New Palo Alto Innovation Clinic

NotreDamerLawLogo
 
 
University of Notre Dame: The Law School
Director, California Innovation Intensive

Location: Palo Alto, California


Notre Dame Law School invites applications to serve as the inaugural full-time Director of the Law School’s new California Innovation Clinic.  The Clinic will provide transactional services and related advice to individuals or entities in the Bay Area seeking to start or expand their own ventures.  The Clinic will operate out of the Notre Dame California center in Palo Alto, California.

The Clinic will provide students, under the supervision of the Clinic Director, opportunities to serve the transactional needs of early-stage startup ventures. The services offered by the Clinic will depend in significant part on the background and skills of the Clinic Director, but we anticipate that the Clinic will assist clients with some or all of the following: entity formation, founder agreements, non-disclosure agreements, ownership agreements, licensing and/or freedom to operate agreements, and privacy and data security policies. Specific client matters will be determined by the Clinic Director, although decisions about the overall direction of the Clinic’s work will be made in consultation with the Dean and other law school faculty members.

The Director will be a full-time staff attorney or non-tenure track faculty member, with responsibility for all aspects of the Innovation Clinic, including client development, client representation, law student supervision, and classroom instruction. The Innovation Clinic will be one of six clinics at the Law School.

Responsibilities of the Director will include

  • Developing a consistent and appropriate base of clients for the clinic;
  • Designing and implementing the Clinic infrastructure including a curriculum, a case management system, and relationships with partner organizations;
  • Providing transactional services to Clinic clients;
  • Supervising up to 8-10 law students per semester, and approximately
    1-2 law students each summer, in direct client representation;
  • Providing law students with instruction in substantive and procedural law necessary to effectively represent Clinic clients;
  • Providing law students with training in core lawyering skills necessary to carry out client representation, including interviewing and counseling, fact investigation, negotiation, drafting corporate  agreements, and oral advocacy;
  • Developing and teaching a companion course covering the range of legal issues that arise at different stages of a startup venture’s development;
  • Collaborating with clinical and other faculty at the Law School;
  • Collaborating with leaders of other entrepreneurship-related activities within the broader University, including the IDEA Center;
  • Attending conferences and interacting with faculty at other institutions; and
  • Assisting in the development of additional financial resources for the Clinic.
QUALIFICATIONS

The ideal candidate will have the following qualifications:

  • A Juris Doctor degree from an ABA-accredited law school and at least 8-10 years of practice experience relevant to the representation of startup ventures in transactional matters;
  • Excellent supervisory and communication skills;
  • A commitment to instructing and supervising law students;
  • Ability to work in a self-directed and entrepreneurial environment;
  • An academic record that demonstrates the capacity to be an active participant in the Law School’s academic community and in the national clinical-education community; and
  • A license to practice law in the State of California.

Term and Compensation: The position is full-time with a salary commensurate with experience, plus benefits, which include medical, dental, and retirement.  The initial contract will be for a two-year term beginning July 1, 2018, or as soon as possible.  

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS

Application Process and DeadlineApplicants should submit a cover letter and a Curriculum Vitae.

The Search Committee will begin reviewing applications immediately.  The position will remain open until filled. 

For more information contact Professor Mark McKenna at 574-631-9258 or markmckenna@nd.edu.

October 23, 2017 in Clinical Education, Entrepreneurship, Joan Heminway, Jobs, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)

Monday, September 18, 2017

The New Yale Law School Entrepreneurial Law Clinic Needs a Director . . . .

Yale Law School invites applications for an inaugural, full time faculty director for its new Entrepreneurship Clinic. The position, which will be at the rank of Clinical Associate Professor or Clinical Professor of Law, will begin on July 1, 2018.

A key ambition of Yale University is “to provide an unsurpassed campus learning environment that cultivates innovators, leaders, pioneers, creators, and entrepreneurs in all fields and for all sectors of society.” Yale Law School is contributing to that goal by forming a new Entrepreneurship Clinic, which will provide transactional services and related legal advice to individuals or entities seeking to start or expand their own ventures. The Entrepreneurship Clinic is expected to become a central component of the Yale University student innovation ecosystem, which encompasses both curricular programs (such as the Yale School of Management Programs on Entrepreneurship and Social Enterprise), as well as independent, cross disciplinary centers (such as the Tsai Center for Innovative Thinking at Yale). Although it is envisioned that clients for the Entrepreneurship Clinic will come primarily from these programs, there may be opportunities for creating partnerships with the Office of Cooperative Research (which focuses on faculty ventures) and with the greater New Haven entrepreneurial community.

In addition to being a central component of the Yale University student innovation ecosystem, the Entrepreneurship Clinic will become an integral part of the business law programs at Yale Law School. Yale Law School has a rich tradition in corporate law (http://ccl.yale.edu/history-business-law-yale) and has two Centers devoted to corporate and commercial law, the Center for the Study of Corporate Law (http://ccl.yale.edu/) and the Center for Private Law (https://law.yale.edu/centers-workshops/yale-law-school-center-private-law). The Centers sponsor lectures, panels, and symposia, which bring together academics, policymakers, and members of the bar and business communities. There is also a large and vibrant student group, the Yale Law & Business Society. In addition, Yale Law School has a strong partnership with the Yale School of Management, as evinced by the joint J.D./M.B.A. program, which students can complete on an accelerated track in three years, as well as in the more conventional four years.

As the inaugural director and a member of the full time law faculty, the director will shape the future of the Entrepreneurship Clinic. The responsibilities of the position include:

  • designing the curriculum for the seminar component of the Clinic, which may cover, among other things: pre venture counseling; entity selection and tax planning; entity formation or entry into joint ventures or strategic alliances; intellectual property; licensing and regulatory compliance; employee management; non-profit ventures; and start-up financing, and teaching the seminar;
  • arranging the fieldwork component of the Clinic and supervising law student representation of clients, including transactional drafting, review, or negotiation, as appropriate, of organizational documents, founder 2 agreements, non- disclosure agreements, employment agreements and accompanying equity compensation agreements, independent contractor agreements, supplier or other vendor agreements, debt documents, and venture investment term sheets;
  • building and maintaining relationships between the Clinic and the Yale student innovation programs; and
  • participating in the intellectual life of Yale Law School, including interaction with academic and clinical faculty and Centers or Workshops that may touch upon substantive aspects of entrepreneurship.

Yale Law School is open to director candidates at varying stages of their career. If not currently a member, admission to the State Bar of Connecticut will be required before the end of the first year of full time appointment. Salary is commensurate with experience.

Applicants should have a J.D. degree and a minimum of three plus years of relevant transactional experience, concentrating on startups or venture capital, or transactional experience in related areas, such as mergers and acquisitions, private equity, capital markets (especially initial public offerings), or intellectual property. A strong candidate will have excellent supervisory and communication skills, the ability to work effectively with students and clients, and an interest in developing clinical experiences for students within a community that supports interdisciplinary collaboration and innovative, passionate teaching.

To apply, please submit a letter of interest, resume, and list of three references to Professor Roberta Romano, Chair, Entrepreneurship Clinic Appointments Committee, at roberta.romano@yale.edu. Please write “Entrepreneurship Clinic Application” in the subject line of the email. Review of applications will begin on October 15, 2017 and will continue until the position is filled.

Information about clinical and experiential legal education at Yale Law School can be found at: https://law.yale.edu/studying-law-yale/clinical-and-experiential-learning; additional information about corporate and commercial Law at Yale Law School can be found at: https://law.yale.edu/studying-law-yale/areas-interest/corporate-commercial-law.

Yale University considers applicants for employment without regard to, and does not discriminate on the basis of, an individual's sex, race, color, religion, age, disability, status as a veteran, or national or ethnic origin; nor does Yale discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity or expression.

September 18, 2017 in Clinical Education, Joan Heminway, Jobs | Permalink | Comments (0)

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Job Posting: Entrepreneurial Business Law Clinic

Clinical Faculty Position
The Ohio State University, Michael E. Moritz College of Law

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Description: The Moritz College of Law invites applications for the position of Assistant Clinical Professor of Law in its Entrepreneurial Business Law Clinic (EBLC), to start in late 2017. The EBLC professor has primary responsibility for directing and teaching the Entrepreneurial Business Law Clinic, which provides third-year law students with the opportunity to learn lawyering skills by representing entrepreneurs and their start-up businesses. EBLC students typically work with clients on all phases of starting a business, including client intake, entity formation, legal business planning, and contract drafting (including employment and independent contractor contracts). When relevant for the client, students also learn how to protect the intellectual property of a business. The EBLC’s clinical professor will have several areas of responsibility, including 1) supervising law students who represent clients under the Ohio Supreme Court's student practice rule 2) classroom teaching of lawyering skills, 3) engaging with the local and regional entrepreneurial community, and 4) participating in the life and governance of the College of Law.

We will consider all applicants; however, we prefer candidates with significant experience in representing entrepreneurs and early-stage companies. Candidates also should have an excellent academic record that demonstrates potential for clinical teaching and preparation of clinical educational materials. Candidates should be admitted to the Ohio Bar or eligible for admission in Ohio. The starting salary range will be $78,000 - $81,000 for a 12-month contract; full University fringe benefits are provided as well. The ideal starting date will be November 15, or as soon thereafter as possible. The successful candidate will begin teaching in January 2018.

Application Instructions: A resume, references, and cover letter should be submitted to Professor Paul Rose, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law, 55 West 12th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210. Send e-mail applications to rose.933@osu.edu. Applications will be reviewed immediately and will be accepted until the position is filled; preference will be given to applications received before September 1st.

The Ohio State University is committed to establishing a culturally and intellectually diverse environment, encouraging all members of our learning community to reach their full potential. The Ohio State University is an equal opportunity employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, or protected veteran status.

About Columbus: The Ohio State University campus is located in Columbus, the capital city of Ohio. Columbus is the center of a rapidly growing and diverse metropolitan area with a population of over 1.5 million. The area offers a wide range of very affordable housing, many cultural and recreational opportunities, excellent schools, and a strong economy based on government as well as service, transportation, and technology industries (see http://columbusregion.com/). Columbus and its many suburbs have consistently been rated as one of the Top U.S. places for quality of life. Additional information about the Columbus area is available at http://www.columbus.org.

July 12, 2017 in Clinical Education, Joan Heminway, Jobs, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, December 23, 2016

Law Teaching Positions and Questions to Ask Yourself

I recently updated my list of business law teaching positions. At this point, a number of the positions have probably been filled, but I put posted dates by the more recently posted positions. I still get asked, on a fairly regularly basis, about how one breaks into law teaching, and while I do have thoughts on that topic (basically, write, write, write), I think folks wanting to enter the legal academy should ask themselves a few questions first. 

  1. Are you truly drawn to both teaching and research (or are you just tired of practicing)?
  2. Are you geographically flexible? (You have to be both really good and really lucky to pick your geographic location in legal academia)
  3. Do you have a few years to devote to pursuing a career in legal academia? (these days, it often takes a VAP or two, and/or a few years on the market to secure an academic job).
  4. If you are in BigLaw, are you truly comfortable with a sizable pay cut?
  5. Can you be patient with students, administrators, staff, etc.? (things typically move much more slowly in academia than in practice)

Once you have received one of more offers, I would ask the following questions.

  1. What is my BATNA (best alternative to a negotiated agreement? (If you only have one academic offer, and don't like your alternatives in practice, you should be very careful in negotiating and should try to avoid offending the offering school).
  2. Can I see myself living in this part of the country? (Accessibility to a major airport can be an important consideration as well, if you plan to travel for work or personal reasons)
  3. What is the teaching package? Does it include night, weekend, or online courses?
  4. What are the research expectations? When are reviews done? Roughly what percentage of faculty members achieve tenure?
  5. How is the financial stability of the school? What is the reputation of the school? Does the school have strong distinctive? How is the local competition? What is the discount rate trend? What is the LSAT/UGPA trend?
  6. How do you get along with the faculty members you met?
  7. Is the surrounding town/city an area where it is easy or difficult to find an appropriate job for your significant other?
  8. If you have young children or plan to have children, how are the schools in the area? Does the university have a tuition exchange and/or tuition payment program?

There are many more questions to ask, but again, it is important to start with your alternatives. If you have strong alternatives, you can be more picky, but you also don't want to start your academic career with an overly aggressive negotiation.

I still think teaching is the most rewarding job available, but there are definitely important questions to ask before pursing an academic career path and before committing to school.

December 23, 2016 in Business School, Clinical Education, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School | Permalink | Comments (0)

Thursday, October 6, 2016

Georgetown University Law Center – Graduate Teaching Fellowship, Social Enterprise & Nonprofit Law Clinic

Today, I received the position announcement below from my friend Alicia Plerhoples (Georgetown), who is doing exciting things in the social enterprise and nonprofit areas. This is an excellent opportunity, and I think anyone would be fortunate to work with her and her clinic. 

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Georgetown University Law Center –
Graduate Teaching Fellowship, Social Enterprise & Nonprofit Law Clinic

Description of the Clinic

The Social Enterprise & Nonprofit Law Clinic at Georgetown University Law Center offers pro bono corporate and transactional legal services to social enterprises, nonprofit organizations, and select small businesses headquartered in Washington, D.C. and working locally or internationally. Through the Clinic, law students learn to translate theory into practice by engaging in the supervised practice of law for educational credit. The Clinic’s goals are consistent with Georgetown University's long tradition of public service. The Clinic’s goals are to:

  • Teach law students the materials, expectations, strategies, and methods of transactional lawyering, as well as an appreciation for how transactional law can be used in the public interest.

  • Represent social enterprises and nonprofit organizations in corporate and transactional legal matters.

  • Facilitate the growth of social enterprise in the D.C. area.

    The clinic’s local focus not only allows the Clinic to give back to the community it calls home, but also gives students an opportunity to explore and understand the challenges and strengths of the D.C. community beyond the Georgetown Law campus. As D.C. experiences increasing income inequality, it becomes increasingly important for the Clinic to provide legal assistance to organizations that serve and empower vulnerable D.C. communities. Students are taught how to become partners in enterprise for their clients with the understanding that innovative transactional lawyers understand both the legal and non-legal incentive structures that drive business organizations.

    Description of Fellowship

    The two-year fellowship is an ideal position for a transactional lawyer interested in developing teaching and supervisory abilities in a setting that emphasizes a dual commitment—clinical education of law students and transactional law employed in the public interest. The fellow will have several areas of responsibility, with an increasing role as the fellowship progresses. Over the course of the fellowship, the fellow will: (i) supervise students in representing nonprofit organizations and social enterprises on transactional, operational, and corporate governance matters, (ii) share responsibility for teaching seminar sessions, and (iii) share in the administrative and case handling responsibilities of the Clinic. Fellows also participate in a clinical pedagogy seminar and other activities designed to support an interest in clinical teaching and legal education. Successful completion of the fellowship results in the award of an L.L.M. in Advocacy from Georgetown University. The fellowship start date is August 1, 2017 and the fellowship is for two years, ending July 31, 2019.

    Qualifications

Applicants must have at least 3 years of post J.D. legal experience. Preference will be given to applicants with experience in a transactional area of practice such as nonprofit law and tax, community economic development law, corporate law, intellectual property, real estate, and finance. Applicants with a strong commitment to economic justice are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be admitted or willing to be admitted to the District of Columbia Bar.

Application Process

To apply, send a resume, an official or unofficial law school transcript, and a detailed letter of interest by December 15, 2016. The letter should be no longer than two pages and address a) why you are interested in this fellowship; b) what you can contribute to the Clinic; c) your experience with transactional matters and/or corporate law; and d) anything else that you consider pertinent. Please address your application to Professor Alicia Plerhoples, Georgetown Law, 600 New Jersey Ave., NW, Suite 434, Washington, D.C. 20001, and email it to socialenterprise@law.georgetown.edu. Emailed applications are preferred. More information about the clinic can be found at www.socialenterprise-gulaw.org.

Teaching fellows receive an annual stipend of approximately $53,500 (estimated 2016 taxable salary), health and dental benefits, and all tuition and fees in the LL.M. program. As full-time students, teaching fellows qualify for deferment of their student loans. In addition, teaching fellows may be eligible for loan repayment assistance from their law schools.

October 6, 2016 in Clinical Education, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Law School, Nonprofits, Social Enterprise | Permalink | Comments (0)

Saturday, September 10, 2016

Harvard Negotiation & Mediation Clinical Program Positions

HLS

Harvard Negotiation & Mediation Clinical Program is looking to fill two clinical instructor positions (one with a focus on facilitation and political dialogue) for July 2017.

Details about the positions are available here

September 10, 2016 in ADR, Clinical Education, Haskell Murray, Jobs, Negotiation | Permalink | Comments (0)

Friday, February 26, 2016

Mandatory Attendance at Campus Talks?

Anne_Anderson_(cropped)

A few weeks ago, I had the privilege of attending a luncheon talk by Anne Anderson, Ireland's Ambassador to the United States. Ambassador Anderson covered a range of topics, including Ireland's place in and commitment to the EU, the financial and political situation in the EU, and Ireland's success in attracting international businesses. 

At Belmont, we require our undergraduate students to attend 60 hours worth of campus talks/presentations/workshops over their four years. When I first heard about this requirement, I must admit that I thought it a bit paternalistic. But looking back on my college experience, I do wish I would have been nudged (or even required) to attend more of the wonderful talks that took place on campus. To be clear, our students get to choose which talks they attend and there are many options. 

While I have come around on these requirements for undergraduates, I am not sure if I would require campus talk attendance of law students -- to my knowledge we don't. Given that graduate students are, or should be, more mature, I don't think I would require them to attend campus talks, but I might give them some sort of certificate if they attended a certain number.

Somewhat similarly, when I was in law school, my school started a pro bono recognition program. Basically, you received one of three levels of "pro bono recognition" depending on the number of pro bono hours you worked for external public interest organizations. The results of this small recognition program were impressive; only 1 of my 10-15 closest friends was doing pro bono work before the program, but about 80% of us were doing pro bono work afterward. This is admittedly a small sample, but the program seemed to impact the entire school. 

That said, maybe by graduate school we should try to teach students to do things for their own sake, and not merely for recognition.  

February 26, 2016 in Business School, Clinical Education, Haskell Murray, Law School | Permalink | Comments (1)

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Encouraging Student "Thriving" Through Group Simulations

Last week was the oral midterm examination week for students in my in Business Associations class.  I admit to exhaustion and jubilation at the end of that week every year.  I think the students feel about the same way . . . .

This year's examination related to an expulsion of members in a member-managed limited liability company (LLC).  The facts were based on an interesting Tennessee case with which many LLC aficionados are no doubt familiar: Anderson v. Wilder.  The exam questions related to the validity and effects of the expulsion under the Revised Uniform Limited Liability Company Act and the LLC's operating agreement, the potential breaches of fiduciary duty and failure to comply with the contractual obligation of good faith and fair dealing, and the possible resulting causes of action and remedies--including any effects of the members' dissociation.

In a blog post last weekend from Lou Sirico and our other friends at the Legal Skills Prof Blog, I divined support for all of us who engage in practice-focused legal education: these teaching/learning methods can help students to thrive, not merely survive.  It has been my (admittedly anecdotal) observation that students who engage in simulations (as well as those who participate in clinics and internships/externships) in law school are happier and more well-adjusted about their education and their post-graduation employment.  Last week's oral midterms--conducted in groups of three--gave me some windows on that world.  I will share a few here.

Continue reading

October 14, 2015 in Business Associations, Clinical Education, Joan Heminway, Law School, Lawyering, LLCs, Teaching | Permalink | Comments (0)