Friday, January 21, 2022

Sharing About Some Teaching Materials

We just finished our first week of class for the spring semester!  It was a busy several days (as I would imagine the first week of the semester tends to be for all!).  As I returned to teaching mode, I thought of some teaching materials I’d like to share (and somewhat reshare) with BLPB readers.

First, several years ago, I blogged about Professor Richard Shell’s Springboard: Launching Your Personal Search for Success (here and here).  I mentioned his Six Lives Exercise, but I didn’t explain much about it.  Not only do I think it’s a great personal reflection exercise, but it generally generates a significant amount of classroom discussion and interest.   As I’ve used it several times now and it tends to generate a lot of student discussion, I thought I’d reshare about it!  Although I recommend buying the book, it’s not necessary to do the exercise, which is available here.  Shell provides vignettes of six lives: a teacher, wealthy investor, tennis pro, stone mason, and non-profit executive.  After reading their stories, students (or the reader) is invited to rank the lives in the order of “most successful” to “least successful” from their perspective.  Shell argues that success has an inner (internal happiness and satisfaction) and an outer dimension (social achievement, fame etc.).  The class (or reader) can then reflect upon how success is being defined in each of these lives, how they personally define success, the extent to which their ranking reflects their definition, and small steps to minimize any misalignment.

Second, if you teach contracts and you don’t know about Leonard v Pepsico (I didn’t until Professor Kimberly Houser told me about it.  Thanks, Kim!), you should!  It’s a really fun and students love it!  Professor Jeremy Telman has blogged about it (here) with links to videos of the Pepsi commercial at issue.  In a nutshell, Pepsi made a commercial about various items that could be purchased with different amounts of Pepsi Points.  At the end of the commercial, a Harrier Fighter Jet appeared with the words “7,000,000 Pepsi Points.”  Needless to say, Pepsi wasn’t offering fighter jets to customers in exchange for their Pepsi Points.  However, one customer did amass all of these points and then sought to claim a jet!

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/business_law/2022/01/sharing-about-some-teaching-materials.html

Colleen Baker, Teaching | Permalink

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