Sunday, June 30, 2019

Advice for the New Business Law Prof – Part V: A Potpourri

I don’t have enough material for another focused post on advice for new business law professors (see posts I, II, III, and IV).  However, I do have a smattering of additional thoughts that I wanted to share in hopes that new professors, and potentially others, might find them helpful.  So, in no particular order:

  • As in much of life, less is generally more. Specifically, in prepping a new class, in your excitement, you might initially want to try to cover almost all of the casebook.  Just say no!  For example, given my research interests, I always wanted to cover derivatives etc. in my Banking and Financial Institutions Law course.  However, I finally learned that in a three-hour course without prerequisites, I only had time to cover how banks (and some bank-like financial institutions) were structured, regulated, and handled when in trouble. 

 

  • I think it’s helpful to add syllabus language (and note it to students) along the lines of the following: “In practice, the learning experience of each course is unique. I reserve the right to modify the scheduled readings or material to be covered to promote the best educational experience for students.” I certainly don’t recommend wholesale changes mid-course to the syllabus.  However, I do think, as fellow co-bloggers have aptly pointed out, that clearly setting expectations early on is critical.  Hence, it is helpful to set the expectation that there might be some variation in the assignments over the course of the semester to match the pace of the class.

 

  • The professor sets the energy level of each class. This is particularly important to remember if one is teaching at 8am, right after lunch, or in the evening!

 

  • When possible, be encouraging! We all love to receive encouragement!  Let’s do our best to distribute it too!  For example, if a student’s answer to a question is wrong, is there something positive you can say about their response, and then steer the class to the right answer?      

 

  • Our words, even if only casual remarks, often carry great weight with our students.

 

  • Where possible, I find it helpful to use in-class examples students can relate to, and occasionally to share recent news stories relevant to the material we’re studying.

 

  • In some courses, I’ve found it helpful to begin each class by summarizing at a very high level what we’ve already covered, what we’ll be covering that day, and what we are going to cover in the near future. Many students appreciate a reminder of the big picture.

Ok experienced professor-readers, is there something we’ve yet to mention that you think important to share with new business law professors?  If so, please help us out with a comment!    

 

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/business_law/2019/06/advice-for-the-new-business-law-prof-part-v-a-potpourri.html

Colleen Baker, Teaching | Permalink

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