Appellate Advocacy Blog

Editor: Tessa L. Dysart
The University of Arizona
James E. Rogers College of Law

Friday, July 23, 2021

Appellate Advocacy Blog Weekly Roundup Friday, July 23, 2021

WeeklyRoundupGraphic

Each week, the Appellate Advocacy Blog Weekly Roundup presents a few tidbits of news and Twitter posts from the past week concerning appellate advocacy. As always, if you see something during the week that you think we should be sure to include, feel free to send a quick note to either (1) Dan Real at DReal@Creighton.edu or on Twitter @Daniel_L_Real or (2) Catharine Du Bois at DuBoisLegalWriting@gmail.com or on Twitter @CLDLegalWriting.

US Supreme Court Opinions and News

  • Mississippi’s attorney general has asked the Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade, calling it “egregiously wrong.” The Court will ear argument this fall on whether to allow Mississippi’s law that bans most abortions after 15 weeks. See the Brief for Petitioners and reports from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Reuters, and Bloomberg News.

  • Adam Feldman wrote an analysis of the 2020-21 Supreme Court shadow docket; it was posted on The Juris Lab. Coined by Professor William Baude, the term “shadow docket” refers to the Court’s decisions made outside the regular docket and without oral argument. 

 Appellate Court Opinions and News

  • The DC Court of Appeals tossed a Constitutional challenge against Speaker Nancy Pelosi and a House resolution to create a proxy voting system to allow remote legislating during the pandemic. The court determined that it did not have jurisdiction to review rules and procedures of the House. The court agreed with the lower court decision that “the resolution and its implementation lie within the immunity for legislative acts conferred by the Constitution’s Speech and Debate Clause.” See the decision and reports from The Hill and The New York Times.

  • The Tenth Circuit upheld as constitutional a law that permits the revocation of the passport of a person who owes taxes. Thus, the court determined that international travel is not a fundamental right. This ruling is the first of its kind. See the decision and reports from Bloomberg Law and The Gazette (CO).

  • The US District Court for the Northern District of Indiana denied a petition to preliminarily enjoin an Indiana University Covid policy that requires all students and staff to be vaccinated, with exceptions for religious, ethical, or medical reasons. The policy requires those who are unvaccinated to take special precautions including wearing masks, taking additional Covid tests, and quarantining during an outbreak. The court weighed individual freedoms against public health concerns and found that the petitioners did not show they would suffer irreparable harm. The court held that “[t]he university is presenting the students with a difficult choice — get the vaccine or else apply for an exemption or deferral, transfer to a different school, or forego schools for the semester altogether. … But, this hard choice doesn't amount to coercion.” See the decision and reports from NPR, USA Today, and The Wall Street Journal.  

  • The Fourth Circuit has ruled that gun laws barring sales to those under 21 are unconstitutional because they restrict the rights of citizens. The court wrote: “Despite the weighty interest in reducing crime and violence, we refuse to relegate either the Second Amendment or 18-to-20-year-olds to a second-class status.” See the decision and reports from CNN, USA Today, and The Hill.

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/appellate_advocacy/2021/07/appellate-advocacy-blog-weekly-roundup-friday-july-23-2021.html

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