Appellate Advocacy Blog

Editor: Tessa L. Dysart
The University of Arizona
James E. Rogers College of Law

Friday, August 14, 2020

Appellate Advocacy Blog Weekly Roundup Friday, August 14, 2020

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Each week, the Appellate Advocacy Blog Weekly Roundup presents a few tidbits of news and Twitter posts from the past week concerning appellate advocacy. As always, if you see something during the week that you think we should be sure to include, feel free to send a quick note to either (1) Dan Real at DReal@Creighton.edu or on Twitter @Daniel_L_Real or (2) Catharine Du Bois at DuBoisLegalWriting@gmail.com or on Twitter @CLDLegalWriting.

US Supreme Court Opinions and News

  • The Supreme Court rejected a request to stay a trial judge’s ruling that suspended a requirement that an absentee ballot be filled out in front of a witness or notary, thus making absentee voting in Rhode Island easier. The court noted the contrast to last month’s ruling (Merrill v. People First of Alabama) that upheld a similar Alabama witness requirement for absentee ballots, stating that unlike “cases where a State defends its own law, here the state election officials support the challenged decree, and no state official has expressed opposition.” Thus, the Court found that the groups challenging the ruling “lack[ed] cognizable interest in the State’s ability to ‘enforce its duly enacted’ laws.”  See the order here and reports from The New York Times, CNN, and Politico.

  • The Court denied a request from the NCAA to stay a lower court ruling that allows colleges to provide education-related expenses to athletes. The challenged Ninth Circuit ruling upheld a district court’s injunction that found that the NCAA violated antitrust laws by barring schools from providing such expenditures to student athletes. The injunction will therefore stay in place pending the NCAA’s appeal. See reports from CNN and USA Today.

  • The Federalist Society’s D.C. Lawyers Chapter hosted its annual U.S. Supreme Court round up this week covering the 2019-2020 term. A recording of the event is available at this link.

Federal Appellate Court Opinions and News

  • The Eleventh Circuit upheld a lower court’s decision finding unconstitutional a Florida school’s transgender bathroom policy that prohibited a transgender student’s using the bathroom that matched his gender identity.  In upholding the decision, the court recognized that “[a] public school may not punish its students for gender nonconformity. Neither may a public school harm transgender students by establishing arbitrary, separate rules for their restroom use.” The Eleventh Circuit ruling will affect school policy in Florida, Georgia, and Alabama. See order and reports from Courthouse News, CBS News, and Law.com.

  • The D.C. Circuit blocked a lower court’s order that Hillary Clinton be deposed as part of a lawsuit seeking records related to her use of a private email while Secretary of State. The ruling found that the stated topics for Clinton’s deposition were “completely attenuated from any relevant issue in [the FOIA] case.” See the order and reports from The Hill, Law.com, and Politico.

  • The Second Circuit upheld a lower court ruling that challengers lacked standing for their claims that NY gun licensing laws violated their Second Amendment rights. The challenge was to NY’s general prohibition against the possession of a firearm without a license. See the order and report from Bloomberg Law.

  • The Eighth Circuit has vacated and remanded for reconsideration a district court’s 2017 order enjoining four Arkansas abortion law that ban certain procedures and impose criminal penalties on doctors. The challenge claimed that the requirements of the laws could block access to all abortion procedures. The Eighth Circuit relied on Justice Robert’s concurrence in the June 29, 2020, decision in June Medical Services L. L. C. v. Russo and remanded for reconsideration in light of Justice Robert’s emphasis that “wide discretion” should be given to legislatures “in areas of medical uncertainty.” See the order and reports from Courthouse News, CNN, The Hill, and The National Law Journal.

State News

Recognizing the racists origins of the phrase, a Massachusetts court has refused to use the term “grandfathering” in its orders.  See footnote 11 in the order and a report from The New York Times.

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/appellate_advocacy/2020/08/appellate-advocacy-blog-weekly-roundup-friday-august-14-2020.html

Appellate Advocacy, Appellate Practice, Federal Appeals Courts, State Appeals Courts, United States Supreme Court | Permalink

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