Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Empirical paper on why coffee is good for you and saves your life

Holiday cheer from someone who just bought a seasonal Keurig variety yesterday at Trader Joe's (and I love Trader Joe's as a concept and for the combination of price and quality) - Pumpkin Spice: Coffee is good for your health and can save your life. Every antitrust lawyer and economist should rejoice.

Association of Coffee Consumption with Total and Cause-Specific Mortality in Three Large Prospective Cohorts

  1. Ming Ding1;
  2. Ambika Satija1;
  3. Shilpa N. Bhupathiraju1;
  4. Yang Hu1;
  5. Qi Sun2;
  6. Jiali Han3;
  7. Esther Lopez-Garcia4;
  8. Walter Willett2;
  9. Rob M. van Dam5;
  10. Frank B. Hu2*

Author Affiliations

  1. Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
  2. Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA & Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  3. Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN
  4. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid/IdiPAZ, CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain
  5. Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA & National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore

Abstract

Background—The association between consumption of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and risk of mortality remains inconclusive.

Methods and Results—We examined the associations of consumption of total, caffeinated, and decaffeinated coffee with risk of subsequent total and cause-specific mortality among 74,890 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS), 93,054 women in the NHS 2, and 40,557 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Coffee consumption was assessed at baseline using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. During 4,690,072 person-years of follow-up, 19,524 women and 12,432 men died. Consumption of total, caffeinated, and decaffeinated coffee were non-linearly associated with mortality. Compared to non-drinkers, coffee consumption one to five cups/d was associated with lower risk of mortality, while coffee consumption more than five cups/d was not associated with risk of mortality. However, when restricting to never smokers, compared to non-drinkers, the HRs of mortality were 0.94 (0.89 to 0.99) for ≤ 1 cup/d, 0.92 (0.87 to 0.97) for 1.1-3 cups/d, 0.85 (0.79 to 0.92) for 3.1-5 cups/d, and 0.88 (0.78 to 0.99) for > 5 cups/d (p for non-linearity = 0.32; p for trend < 0.001). Significant inverse associations were observed for caffeinated (p for trend < 0.001) and decaffeinated coffee (p for trend = 0.022). Significant inverse associations were observed between coffee consumption and deaths due to cardiovascular disease, neurological diseases, and suicide. No significant association between coffee consumption and total cancer mortality was found.

Conclusions—Higher consumption of total coffee, caffeinated coffee, and decaffeinated coffee was associated with lower risk of total mortality.

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/antitrustprof_blog/2015/11/empirical-paper-on-why-coffee-is-good-for-you-and-saves-your-life.html

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