Friday, April 26, 2019

NY ASP Workshop Review

Myra Orlen was kind enough to put together a recap of the NY ASP workshop.  Her report is below.

 

Kudos to Kris Franklin of the NYLS and Rebecca Flanagan of UMass Law School for organizing a wonderful workshop at NYLS on April 12, 2019.

The morning offered excellent presentations – most centering on providing ASP and Bar programs to part-time students. 

The New York Workshop offers a unique opportunity for ASP’ers to select a topic that they want to learn more about and offer to lead a discussion on that topic.  The afternoon sessions offered a mix of  focused discussions and more traditional presentations.  All were excellent!

The morning sessions focused on assisting part-time law students

ASP’ers from Pace Law School – Danielle Kocal, Stephanie Desiato, Stephen Iannacone, and Kerriann Stout shared ideas about helping part-time students maximize their time by thinking about life in terms of buckets: work; family; and school.  Part-time students can benefit by using a planner and filling each bucket at the beginning of the week.

ASP’ers from the CUNY School of Law addressed Time Management – inside and outside the Academic and Bar Support Classroom. Most striking in the CUNY presentation was the ratio of ASP staff to students – in both the full-time and part-time programs. CUNY has a very well-resourced program.  Ninety percent of students participate in CUNY’s voluntary program that stands as a model for those ASP’ers attending the workshop.  CUNY staffers provide in-person and on-line programming.  ASP staff sit in on one-L doctrinal courses and run ASP sessions that cover skills such as doctrinal review, case reading/briefing, note taking, practice exams, and answering hypos.  The CUNY presenters included Haley Meade, Laura Mott, Asima Chaudhary, Nate Broughty, and Allie Robbins.

Reichi Lee of Golden Gate University School of Law spoke on using online/hybrid programs to support part-time students.  GGU has a 60-student part-time program.  Students are on campus three nights a week.  GGU maintains an e-learning on-line website.  The e-learning website contains workshops that are accessible to students.

Kandace Kukas of Northeastern University School of Law discussed coaching part-time students through the bar, including having frank conversations about whether students are ready for the challenge.  Factors to consider are work and life schedules, commitments, and whether they will be able to devote the necessary time to prepare for the bar exam.  Kandace suggested meeting with part-time students early, by their second-to-last year, and at the beginning of their final year.  The key is to establish the trust necessary for honest dialogue with part-time students.  Topics to be discussed include planning, time to devote to bar preparation, work time – can students take time off from work – or will students quit work.  It is important to check in with students during their final semester and as bar applications are due.  Kandace also stressed that it is important to coach students that taking the bar exam unprepared hurts students and their school.  Students who get raw scores of 80/90 on full-length practice exams should strongly consider delaying taking the bar exam.  Attendees at the workshop agreed that failing the bar exam is a devastating blow.

Shane Dizon of Brooklyn Law School lead attendees in an exercise to consider whether law schools should require or recommend upper-division bar course mandates for evening students.

Rebecca Flanagan of the University of Massachusetts School of Law presented on “Them Digital Natives! Gen Z and Technology Usage.”  Rebecca has continued her research on who our law students are – generationally.  Current students can be viewed as Digital Natives – information has always been available to these digital natives.  For Digital Natives, information has always been available and readily consumable.  But these Digital Natives do not know everything about technology.  They know the social aspects, but do not know how to use digital tools. They are not skilled at interacting with each other without a technology as a mediating force and can struggle with interpersonal communications. 

 

The Afternoon Sessions:

As the afternoon sessions began, Kris Franklin sent around a pad and asked those attending the workshop to contribute a “what I wish I knew when I began my work in ASP.”  That list has been shared on the ASP list serve and this blog.

Eileen Pizzurro of Rutgers Law School lead a discussion on Orientation and ASP.

Chris Payne-Tsoupros of the UDC/David A. Clarke School of Law lead a discussion on Enhancing Student Engagement in Summer Programming. 

Nicole Lefton, C. Benji Louis, and Cara Caporale of Hofstra, Maurice A. Deane School of Law, lead a discussion on Reinforcing Executive Function Skills.  In this session, we learned that our executive function is plastic and improvable and learned about techniques to incorporate executive functioning and metacognition into academic success and bar programming.

Stephen Horowitz, of St. John’s University School of Law, presented on “1.5 Gen. Students and “Sound Right” vs. Read-Right Grammar Strategies.”   In this presentation, we learned techniques to use with students who came to the U.S.  in their teens or earlier or for undergrad.  They seem fluent in English, but “quirks” arise in written English.  They learned English by ear and know what sounds right.  One technique addressed was the use of iweb corpus as to word choice.

Kris Franklin of New York Law School, presented on “Framing Legal Rules Helpfully.”  In her presentation, Kris Franklin used an IRAC exercise to show that framing legal rules helps to accurately spot issues. If a student has not accurately framed the rule, the student will have difficulty successfully addressing the whole problem contained in an IRAC hypothetical.

Susan Landrum, of St. John’s University School of Law, lead the final discussion on “Self-care: Reducing Burnout When Working with Stressed-Out Students.”  The last session was a discussion of self-care for ASP’ers.  “You can’t pour from an empty cup.”  This discussion was a great way to end the workshop.  Whether it’s setting a time each day for a walk or for meditating, ASP’ers experience high burnout; we cannot give everyone all of our time.  The workshop ended with what all of us do for ourselves.  This writer takes lessons in landscape painting.

 

As usual, after the workshop ended, we went to a local establishment and continued to socialize.  Also as usual, the New York Academic Success workshop did not disappoint.  I end where I began, kudos to Kris Franklin and Rebecca Flanagan!

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/academic_support/2019/04/ny-asp-workshop-review.html

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