Sunday, January 21, 2018

Ready to Succeed - or Not

We are finishing our second week of classes. As part of the start up, I have been meeting one-one-one with probation students. We will have weekly appointments during the semester to assess strengths and problems, implement strategies, and monitor progress. The first appointments with students always give me a great deal of insight into their mindsets on success.

Here are some of the characteristics of the students on probation who are ready to succeed this semester:

  • They arrive on time or ahead of time for their appointments.
  • They take out a pen and paper or laptop to take notes during the meeting without prompting from me.
  • When asked to fill out an information sheet, they can list fall courses/professors/grades and their spring courses/professors without having to look them up.
  • They have reflected on last semester's grades and study strategies and can articulate some ideas for improvement.
  • They ask questions throughout our discussion to clarify points or inquire about areas we will cover this semester.
  • They have started the exam review process with emails to some of their fall professors before seeing me.
  • They use a daily planner or electronic calendar to record assignments and the date/time of our next meeting.

And then there are students on probation who do not seem ready to succeed yet (fortunately a small group). Hopefully that will change after grade shock/anger/angst has passed.

  • They have not scheduled an appointment with me before the end of the second week of classes as required by the law school
  • They "no show" the first appointment or arrive late to the appointment.
  • They come to the appointment without anything - no pen and paper, no laptop, no knapsack, nothing.
  • When asked to fill out an information sheet, they do not follow clear instructions or cannot remember the information to complete a section.
  • They have not given any thought to the last semester's grades beyond "if I had been in the easy section" or "Professor X's exam was too hard" or "I wouldn't have been on probation if I just got a D+ in Y course instead of a D" or other answers that are basically non-reflection.
  • They scowl, slouch in their chairs, sigh deeply in boredom, or exhibit other signs of frustration and animosity for having to meet.
  • They make no notes on assigned tasks or the date/time for the next meeting.

Past semesters reassure me that the second group of students will come around. It may be several weeks before they are ready to take advantage of new strategies, but they come around at least 95% of the time. Unfortunately, if it takes too long to do so, they will have lost valuable time.

But I live in hope. (Amy Jarmon)

 

https://lawprofessors.typepad.com/academic_support/2018/01/ready-to-succeed-or-not.html

Learning Styles, Miscellany, Professionalism | Permalink

Comments

Post a comment