Thursday, November 17, 2011

Double Jeopardy Review in Honest Services Fraud Reversal Based on Post-Skilling Standard

The Second Circuit yesterday reversed and dismissed (without prejudice) the conviction of former New York State Senate Majority Leader Joseph L. Bruno for theft of honest services fraud on his failure to disclose alleged conflicts of interest.  The reversal was based on the Supreme Court decision in United States v. Skilling, which limited 18 U.S.C. 1346, the honest services statute, to cases involving bribery and kickbacks.  Even though some circuit courts have upheld honest services fraud convictions over Skilling challenges, the reversal here was no surprise since, among other things, the government conceded error.

In an earlier blog (see here), we discussed what might have been the most important issue in the case:  whether the Court should for double jeopardy purposes analyze the sufficiency of the government's evidence at trial based on the "new" standard set forth in Skilling or the "old" standard existing at the time of the trial.

Bruno argued that if there were insufficient evidence at trial to justify a conviction under the Skilling bribery and kickback theory of honest services fraud, the Court must bar retrial on double jeopardy grounds.  The government argued that sufficiency review under a standard different from that at the time of trial was inappropriate and unfair.  (The defense did not contend there was insufficient evidence based on the law at the time of trial.)  At oral argument, the government stated that the evidence at the new trial would be the same as in the first.

The Court, declining to enact any black letter law, and relying considerably on the government's concession that the evidence would not change at a second trial, agreed to analyze the sufficiency of evidence based on the new, narrower Skilling standard.  Nonetheless, after reviewing the facts, the Court held that the evidence was sufficient under that standard.  Bruno, therefore, won the battle but lost the war.  The government announced that it will reindict him under an honest services fraud theory based on bribery and kickbacks.

Last week, a Southern District of New York jury acquitted William Boyland, Jr., a New York State Assemblyman, of honest services fraud for allegedly receiving bribes from David Rosen, the chief executive of a hospital conglomerate, apparently because of lack of sufficient proof of a quid quo pro.  Interestingly, Rosen had two months earlier been convicted in a non-jury trial before Judge Jed S. Rakoff for conspiracy to bribe Boyland based on the same payments at issue.  (The cases were not mirror images.  Rosen was also charged and convicted of conspiring with two others -- a state senator and another assemblyman.)

(goldman)

November 17, 2011 in Fraud, Prosecutions | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, November 8, 2011

Honest Services and Section 666 Includes Fraud Committed by a Foreign Worker

Second Circuit - United States v. Bahel - Honest Services -  Post-Skilling, courts have struggled with what gets included as bribery and kickbacks and what gets omitted from the new contours of honest services. In Bahel, the defendant was convicted of four counts of mail and wire fraud premised on a deprivation of the United Nations, his former employer, and a 666 violation and conspiracy. Issues of immunity were considered, but the court said that the "United Nations expressly waived Bahel's immunity" and that irrespective he waived the issue. The court held that "Section 1346 is broad enough to encompass honest services fraud committed by a foreign worker at the United Nations."

Bahel also argued "that ‘[n]o reading of [18 U.S.C. § 666] could plausibly be extended to the charges in this case,’ because ‘[t]he United States’ membership in the United Nations is not a "federal program" under [Section] 666(b), and the contributions made to the United Nations under the United States treaty obligation in the U.N. Convention and Charter is not a "benefit" or "form of Federal assistance" under that same sub-section.’ Bahel argues accordingly that Section 666 cannot reach the conduct at issue in this case."  The court, however, held that "the United Nations Participation Act, which authorizes the payment of the United States' dues to the United Nations (UN), is both a "federal program" and a "benefit" within the meaning of section 666, which encompasses bribes as well as illegal gratuities."

(esp)

November 8, 2011 in Corruption, Fraud, Judicial Opinions | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Rajat Gupta Charged and Arrested for Insider Trading

Here is the Reuters story. Nothing posted yet on PACER. WSJ Law Blog also has coverage. This will be a much tougher case than Rajaratnam was for the government to prove. This morning's WSJ has a decent background piece (subscription required) on the case.

(wisenberg)

October 26, 2011 in Fraud, Insider Trading, Prosecutions, SEC, Securities | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, October 22, 2011

The UCB Indictment

The indictment returned against former United Commercial Bank senior officers Ebrahim Shabudin and Thomas Yu on September 15, 2011, was unsealed on October 11 in the Northern District of California. This is one of the very few significant bank/securities fraud cases, related to the financial meltdown, that has been brought by Attorney General Holder's Department of Justice. Here is a copy of the Ebrahim Shabudin-Thomas Yu Indictment. A virtually identical criminal information was brought against former UCB senior officer Lauren Tran on May 24, 2011. It was not unsealed until October 13, but Tran pled guilty on June 15. The plea agreement is currently unavailable on PACER, despite the Court's order unsealing the record. The essence of the various charges is that senior bank officials systematically deceived the market and bank regulators about the bank's condition, through false entries and statements.

The invaluable William K. Black has written an outstanding article in Credit Writedowns about the pathetic and long-running failure of federal banking regulators to take any meaningful action against UCB. According to Black:

 "In 2002, a court found that UCB’s senior managers had engaged in fraud to hide losses on a large loan for the purpose of fraudulently inducing another bank to bear the losses. It found the senior officers’ conduct so outrageous that it awarded substantial punitive damages. The FDIC, the SEC, and the Department of Justice did nothing in response to the fraud."

The bank continued to grow at an alarming rate, continued to receive high regulatory grades, and even obtained hundreds of millions in TARP funds, despite its sordid history and the credible warnings of a concerned whistleblower.

This will be a case to follow.

(wisenberg)

October 22, 2011 in Fraud | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, October 21, 2011

Yesterday in Fraud

In an otherwise unremarkable bank and mail fraud affirmance, the Fifth Circuit reminds us that losses cannot be included as relevant conduct unless they are bottomed on criminal and/or fraudulent behavior. The appellant in U.S. v. Bernegger (loss must be criminally derived to count as relevant conduct), obtained two grants of $250K each from the State of Mississippi, which secured a first lien on the underlying collateral. Appellant later pledged the same collateral to other entities, but there was literally no evidence indicating that the original grants were procured through fraud. Nevertheless, the probation officer included the grants in the PSR's loss calculation and the trial court accepted the figure. The Fifth Circut also reiterates that "bare assertions" in a PSR are not, standing alone, evidence. This particular error did not affect appellant's Guidelines range, but did result in a reduced restitution award. The panel consisted of Judges Wiener. Clement, and Elrod. Opinion by the Dutchman.

(wisenberg)

October 21, 2011 in Fraud, Sentencing | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, October 13, 2011

Charges Dropped In Mortgage Fraud Case Following Hung Jury

Prosecutors have decided to drop the charges against an individual who had been arrested last year as part of "Operation Copout," a mortgage fraud investigation.  The individual had initially been charged with 34 criminal charges, including multiple counts of mail and wire fraud. The case had been tried in a five month jury trial that had ended in a hung jury.   

Attorney Michael Pasano, a white collar crime attorney at the law firm of Carlton Fields, who represented the client stated, "The strain on the client and his family was enormous and it is with great relief that we heard today that the Government agreed not to reprosecute and dismissed the case as to Mr. Stoll. It was a hard fought case, and I applaud the prosecutors for doing the right thing,”

It is difficult for prosecutors to be "ministers of justice" with the public outcry for retribution on mortgage fraud cases.  It's nice to see that there are prosecutors out there who can do the right thing when the situation warrants it. 

(esp)

October 13, 2011 in Fraud, Prosecutors, Settlement | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

FCPA In The Trenches

I get emails almost every day touting the latest FCPA seminars, webinars, panel discussions, compliance programs, and treatises. Many of these events are no doubt helpful to the white collar practitioner. But what really happens in the trenches for the few brave individuals who take the government to trial in FCPA cases? What do the final FCPA jury instructions look like? The following links are to selected portions of actual instructions given to juries by federal district courts in some recent prominent FCPA cases. Enjoy.

Bourke_Final_Jury_Charge Selected Instructions[1]

U.S. v. Green Selected Jury Instructions

Lindsey Manufacturing Selected Jury Instructions

PatelFinalJuryInstructions

Hat tip to Todd Foster for the Patel instructions.

(Wisenberg)

 

September 28, 2011 in FCPA, Fraud, Judicial Opinions, Prosecutions | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Lindsey FCPA Defendants File Reply Brief

The Lindsey Manufacturing Reply Brief was filed Sunday night by Defendants Lindsey Manufacturing Company, Keith E. Lindsey, and Steve K, Lee. This is a reply to the Government's Opposition to Defendants' Supplemental Brief in Support of Their Motion to Dismiss the Indictment With Prejudice Due to Repeated and Intentional Government Misconduct. The case is in front of U.S. District Judge Howard Matz in the Central District of California.

(Wisenberg)

September 27, 2011 in Fraud, Prosecutions | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, September 25, 2011

Solyndra Execs: The Best Week Possible

The Washington Post's Chris Cillizza thinks Solyndra had the worst week in Washington, because its CEO and CFO invoked the Fifth Amendment's Privilege Against Self-Incrimination in front of the House Energy and Commerce Committee. According to Cillizza, the silence of the executives "won't win them any allies in Washington." What allies? These guys already have bruises all over their bodies from where politicians have been touching them with eleven foot poles. Cillizza believes that their taking five "ensures that the probe into how Solyndra won the initial loan in 2009...will not only continue...but grow." This is silly. A vigorous criminal investigation is already assured. If the execs had talked they only would have made the DOJ's job easier.

The first place a bank looks when a big loan goes bad is the borrower's application, including the financial statement. For decades the DOJ has operated as a criminal collection agency for our country's financial institutions. It only gets worse if the loan, in this case about a half billion, is guaranteed by Uncle Sugar. Add in the DC gang mentality attendant upon what has become a political scandal and you would have to be a cretin to open yourself up to possible charges of false statements, perjury, or obstruction of justice. This one was a no-brainer. Kudos to the executives and their attorneys for not being idiots.

(Wisenberg)

September 25, 2011 in Congress, Current Affairs, Fraud, Investigations, News, Privileges | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Kevin Ring Sentencing

 Hon. Ellen Segal Huvelle issued a 42 page memorandum opinion regarding the sentencing of Kevin Ring. It was accompanied by a two page chart that includes what were the government recommendations in other related cases (here).  The court notes the sharp difference in recommendationbetween the government and defense in this case - a 17 year difference. The case comes from the Jack Abramoff lobbying scandal that caused several Greenberg Traurig lobbyists to "pled guilty to participating in an influence peddling and bribery scheme." 

A key issue raised by the defense is "that the government is retaliating against him for exercising his Sixth Amendment right to trial." The court notes that "the government cannot retaliate against defendant for exercising his rights."  The detailed sentencing methodology follows with the court's conclusion of a guidelines range of 46-57 months.

See also Doug Berman, Sentencing Law & Policy Blog here; Mary Jacoby, Main Justice, Judge Rejects Recommended Sentence for Ex-Abramoff Lobbyist

(esp)

September 20, 2011 in Fraud, Judicial Opinions, Sentencing | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, September 19, 2011

Saudi Arabia-based Tamimi Global Company Ltd (TAFGA) Gets DPA

A DOJ Press Release here reports that "Saudi Arabia-based Tamimi Global Company Ltd (TAFGA) has agreed to pay the United States $13 million to resolve criminal and civil allegations that the company paid kickbacks to a Kellogg Brown & Root Inc. (KBR) employee and illegal gratuities to a former U.S. Army sergeant, in connection with contracts in support of the Army’s operations in Iraq and Kuwait."  The press release states:

"Under the terms of that agreement, TAFGA will pay the United States $5.6 million as part of a deferred prosecution and institute a strict compliance program to ensure that the company and its employees will abide by the legal and ethical standards required for government contracts.  If TAFGA meets its obligations under the agreement without violation for 18 months, the United States will dismiss the criminal charges."

(esp)

September 19, 2011 in Deferred Prosecution Agreements, Fraud, News, Prosecutions, Settlement | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, September 15, 2011

"Rogue Trader" - OUCH

UBS is having another "ouch" moment as the media is reporting on a rogue trader. The typical questions are - how could this have happened; why was it not discovered sooner; who should be held liable; and should there be criminal liability?  It is too soon to answer many of these questions. But here are some points of interest -

UBS has a corporate responsibility policy that states:

"UBS is firmly committed to corporate responsibility and actively strives to understand, assess, weigh and address the concerns and expectations of the firm's stakeholders. This process supports UBS in its efforts to safeguard and advance the firm’s reputation for responsible corporate conduct. In very direct ways, responsible corporate conduct helps create sustainable value for the company."

Its policies include a host of different preventative measures, such as money laundering prevention here.  It takes pride in employees and notes that "[o]ur employees have the breadth of our businesses, global career opportunities and a collaborative, performance-oriented culture as a platform for individual success."

Rogue employees are not a new development for the corporate arena. No matter how many controls are in place and no matter how much oversight there might be, it is a problem to have full compliance. Knowing this, it seems important to provide companies with a "good faith" defense when a rogue employee commits acts that might be considered criminal.  Unfortunately, to date, courts have only seen fit to insert such as defense in the civil area and not the criminal sphere.  (See Podgor, A New Corporate World Mandates a Good Faith Affirmative Defense)  But corporate criminality in the federal system is premised on respondeat superior and the acts of a rogue employee are hardly for the benefit of the company.

See also -

Dan Fisher, Why Rogue Traders Get Jail But Bad Execs Get A Pension

Frank Jordans & Paisley Dodds, Houston Chronicle, Rogue trader suspected in $2 billion UBS loss

Nathan Vardi, Forbes, Rogue Trader Deals Big Blow To UBS

Victoria Howley & Emma Thomasson, Reuters, UBS $2 billion rogue trade suspect held in London

The Telepgraph, UBS rogue trader: statement to employees in full

(esp)

September 15, 2011 in Fraud, Media, News, Securities | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, September 12, 2011

Maxim Healthcare Gets DPA

A DOJ Press Release here  states that "Maxim Healthcare Services Inc., one of the nation’s leading providers of home healthcare services, has entered into a settlement to resolve criminal and civil charges relating to a nationwide scheme to defraud Medicaid programs and the Veterans Affairs program of more than $61 million."  The Deferred Prosecution Agreement (DPA) provides that Maxim will pay "a criminal penalty of $20 million and to pay approximately $130 million in civil settlements in the matter."  The DPA, which requires the company to meet reform and compliance measures, lasts for two years.

As with many companies who enter into DPAs, there are also individuals being prosecuted.  In this case the press release notes that "[t]o date, nine individuals – eight former Maxim employees, including three senior managers and the parent of a former Maxim patient – have pleaded guilty to felony charges arising out of the submission of fraudulent billings to government health care programs, the creation of fraudulent documentation associated with government program billings, or false statements to government health care program officials regarding Maxim’s activities."

The press release also states that "[t]he government’s willingness to enter into a DPA with Maxim is due, in significant part, to the company’s cooperation and the reforms and remedial actions the company has taken – beginning particularly in May 2009 – including significant personnel changes: terminating senior executives and other employees the company identified as responsible for the misconduct; establishing and filling of positions of chief executive officer, chief compliance officer, chief operations officer/chief clinical officer, chief quality officer/chief medical officer, chief culture officer, chief financial and strategy officer, and vice president of human resources; and hiring a new general counsel."

(esp)

September 12, 2011 in Fraud, Investigations, Prosecutions | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, September 9, 2011

Government Successful in Yet Another Post-Skilling Case

In United States v. Langford, the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals found sufficient evidence in reviewing a post-Skilling case. The court notes in this decision that "[w]e have not expressly explored at length what manner of concealment, if any, is necessary to prove honest services mail or wire fraud.  However, we have said that honest services fraud 'may be proved through the defendant's non-action or non-disclosure of material facts intended to create a false and fraudulent representation."(citations omitted).  There is also an interesting question of "in furtherance" here.

(esp)(w/ a hat tip to Linda Friedman Ramirez)

September 9, 2011 in Fraud, Judicial Opinions | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, September 6, 2011

Coram Nobis & 2255 Granted in Post-Skilling Case

Coram nobis is without doubt an extraordinary remedy and one that has limited application. That said, the Eastern District of Pennsylvania granted such a petition in the case of United States v. Lynch and Campenella. The court found that "where an indictment fails to allege any criminal conduct, a petitioner is excused from the showing of actual innocence." 

The smoking gun in this case came from the government when "during both change-of-plea hearings the Government corrected the Court by clarifying that the crime at issue was an undisclosed conflict of interest, rather than bribery." Further the court notes that "[a]t no point during the change-of-plea hearings or in its guilty plea memoranda did the Government mention a quid pro quo bribery theory." 

Enter the Supreme Court's opinion in Skilling and without the bribery, there is problem in the case. Lynch gets a grant of the petition for coram nobis and Campenella a 2255 motion to vacate the conviction and sentence.  

The bottom line - if you have no crime, relief needs to be granted.

Defense counsel on this case was Lisa A. Mathewson (Lynch) and Angie Halim of Ahmed and Zaffarese (Campanella).

Court's Opinion - Download Opinion granting coram nobis

(esp)

Addendum - See also Joseph Tanfani, Philly.com, Fraud convictions overturned for Philly assessor and developer

September 6, 2011 in Fraud, Judicial Opinions | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, September 4, 2011

Government Successful in Post-Skilling Case

U.S. v. Bryant is a third circuit decision where the court affirmed the convictions finding no defect in the jury instructions for honest services or bribery.  The court found that the "government presented substantial evidence of a quid pro quo bribery scheme to defraud the citizens of New Jersey of Bryant's honest services, including circumstantial evidence of the requisite mens rea..." The court stated that the Skilling case did not "undermine[] the viability of the stream-of-benefits theory." And further is was stated that "[i]ndeed, Skilling did not eliminate from the definition of honest services fraud any particular type of bribery, but simply eliminated honest services fraud theories that go beyond bribery and kickbacks."

The court also looked at a claim of prosecutorial misconduct made by appellants that alleged that prosecutors improperly interfered with the defense's access to witnesses. The court noted that "[i]f the prosecution impermissibly interferes with the defense's access to a witness during a criminal trial, that conduct violates due process insofar as it undermines the fundamental fairness of the proceeding."  In this case, the "District Court took measures to clarify" any "misunderstanding well before trial.  In response to Appellants' motion to dismiss, the Court instructed the Government to send a letter to all subpoena recipients five months before the start of trial, stating that the witness had an 'absolute right to speak to anyone...about anything [they] know about any of the matters under investigation, including the fact that [they] were subpoenaed and ....testified before the grant jury."

Opinion - Download BryantGallagher Opinion

(esp)

Addendum - See also Beldini - Download Beldini NPO

September 4, 2011 in Enron, Fraud, Judicial Opinions | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, August 21, 2011

Post-Skilling Government Approach - Depends on the Case

In Skilling, the Court limited section 1346 to bribes and kickbacks.  But this decision has left courts with several unresolved issues.  The  Stinn case raises an important issue, and the briefs highlight an interesting position being taken by the government.

The defense files a 2255 motion in Stinn saying that Skilling applies and the conviction should be vacated.  - Download Omnibus Memo of Law ISO Stinn's Mtn to Vacate  They note that "[i]t is immaterial that the government and the trial court did not use the phrase 'honest services' in the indictment or the jury instructions. The government argued the same invalid theory as it did in Skilling throughout the trial and relied on that theory to convince the jury to convict Stinn."

The government argues that Skilling does not apply because they did not file the case under 1346. Download Gov's Memo in Opp to D's Mtn to Vacate Convictions & Grant Bail They note "the Supreme Court's holding in Skilling is irrelevant to the defendant's case, as he was not prosecuted under an honest services theory of fraud."

The defense replies, however, with several arguments including - isn't this the exact opposite position the government took in the Redzic case. Download REPLY TO GOVT'S OPP TO MTN TO VACATE  Redzic, an unusual case, had the court finding that the "money or property" portion of the case was problematic and could not stand.  But even though the defendant was not charged under 1346, the court went on to uphold the conviction saying that 1346 did not "create a separate substantive offense, it merely defines a term contained in sections 1341 and 1343."  The court held it was not necessary to cite 1346 in the charging instrument.  

Redzic raised issues of whether the accused had truly been advised under due process of the charges against the defendant since the government was using an uncharged basis for asking that the conviction be upheld.  But now the government in Stinn is saying that it makes a difference whether the government charges a case under 1346. Is the government taking the opposite position in these two cases (Redzic and Stinn), and is this problematic?

(esp)

August 21, 2011 in Enron, Fraud, Judicial Opinions, Prosecutions | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, August 12, 2011

SEC's Dodd-Frank Whistleblower Regulations Take Effect Today. Corporate America Expects More FCPA Woes.

Politico has a story about it here. The new regs implement Section 21F of the Dodd-Frank Act, which authorizes the SEC to award 10 to 30 percent of the monetary sanctions it recovers in a given case to a qualified whistleblower. What seems to most annoy the business community about the implementing regs is the SEC's insistence that whistleblowers are under no obligation to make use of a company's internal complaint procedures before running to the SEC. But the regs do say that an employee who goes through internal company whistleblower protocols is eligible for a Dodd-Frank whistleblower award if his/her employer subsequently self-reports to the SEC, based on the whistleblower's complaint, and a recovery is had. Further, an employee has a 120-day grace period after whistleblowing to his/her company, within which to bring his/her complaint to the SEC. Finally, in determining the amount of a whistleblower reward, the SEC will consider whether the whistleblower made use of his/her internal company procedures.  The new regs contain enhanced anti-retaliation provisions as well, which prohibit direct or indirect retaliation for making whistleblower complaints to the SEC and other government entities.

There is an inherent tension between the anti-retaliation provisions and the SEC's and DOJ's often-emphasized warnings to companies that they should have vigorous and authentic internal whistleblower procedures. What if a company's pre-existing compliance policy requires the prompt internal reporting of whistleblower complaints? Can a company punish an employee who ignores such a provision and goes straight to the SEC? What if the employee declines to internally report, even after going to the SEC, because he/she feels that the company procedure is a sham? My guess is that such punishments will occur and that they will be deemed to run afoul of the anti-retaliation provisions. The retaliatory response is an instinctiual, persistent, and virtually universal impulse. It is really hard to eradicate.

(Wisenberg)

August 12, 2011 in Current Affairs, FCPA, Fraud, Investigations, SEC, Securities | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, August 1, 2011

Commentary on Second Circuit Opinion in AIG and General Re Execs Case

Reported here is the decision in the Ferguson, et. al. case, in which the Second Circuit vacated the convictions. Commentary:

  • It's a 77 page court decision and having several university degrees would assist in understanding the technical aspects of the business workings described here.  One can only imagine the difficulty faced in explaining this to a lay jury.
  • The court finds two errors by the district court, namely that it: "1) abused its discretion by admitting the stock-price data, and 2) issued a jury instruction that directed the verdict on causation."
  • Part of the problem with the admission of the stock-price data was that the "[a]lthough the evidence was admitted only to show materiality, the government exploited it to emphasize the losses caused by the transaction."
  • With respect to the jury instruction, the court noted that "[i]n seeking to accommodate the reasonable phrasings offered by the various parties, the court ended up with a charge that allowed the jury to convict without finding causation."
  • The defendants had not objected to the causation instruction, but the court found the error as plain error. 
  • The court did not find several other errors that were claimed by the defendants.
  • The Global Tech (see here) decision of the Supreme Court is referenced, but it offers no assistance to these defendants.
  • The court notes that the case depended heavily on the testimony of two cooperating witnesses and that their testimony was "bolstered by contemporaneous recordings of calls involving" one of them. But the court also later states with respect to one of these witnesses -  "Certain factual inconsistencies in Napier's testimony are sufficiently obvious to raise an eyebow, but most of the arguments are meritless."
  • The court states: " Since we are vacating the judgments on the grounds discussed above, we need not reconcile these cases or decide whether the prosecution's actions amounted to misconduct. . . . No doubt it is dangerous for prosecutors to ignore serious red flags that a witness is lying, and the government will doubtless approach Napier's revised recollections with a more skeptical eye on remand." The court does note that it would have been difficult for the government to verify the facts and that there was cross-examination and summation "which resolved the credibility issue against the defendants."
  • In light of this, would it really be the "right" action to retry this case?  Hasn't the cost (including emotional cost) to the clients been sufficient by this prosecution?  I can't help but recall the sentencing hearing of one of the accused individuals here, when the judge stated,  "Ms. Monrad was not motivated by personal gain."
  • To the government - please spend our money wisely.

(esp)

August 1, 2011 in AIG, Fraud, Judicial Opinions | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Op-ed on Fraud Guidelines

A must-read op-ed by James Felman and Mary Price in the National Law Journal titled, Four reforms would restore common sense to sentences that have become draconian, disproportionate to the crimes.

(esp)

August 1, 2011 in Fraud, Sentencing | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)