Friday, October 30, 2015

Why Hastert Had To Be Prosecuted

Guest Blogger - Steven H. Levin

White-collar laws are written broadly in order to permit federal prosecutors to combat the increasingly creative, technologically complex efforts of enterprising criminals.  Most, but certainly not all, prosecutors make rational decisions based upon the best possible expenditure of resources, the assessment of the jury appeal of a particular case, and the desire to maintain a good reputation with the bench, if not the bar.  In bringing a case, prosecutors also must consider the deterrent effect of a particular prosecution.

In the case involving Dennis Hastert, it has been reported that he was paying “hush money” to cover up alleged misconduct that occurred several decades ago.  Mr. Hastert’s structuring fell squarely within the broadly worded federal statute.   In his piece (“Should Hastert Have Been Prosecuted?”) Lawrence Goldman is correct to question the purpose such a prosecution serves.  The answer is found in the concept of deterrence.  Mr. Hastert’s prosecution has potential deterrent effect, both in terms of deterring those engaged in structuring (to cover up crimes) and those engaged in blackmail (threatening to expose crimes).

Once the investigation became known, the public learned that Mr. Hastert had been accused of taking money out of a bank account in order to pay an extortionist.  Both would-be structurers and would-be extortionists were put on notice by the federal government: blackmailing may not be successful in the future, because the victim of the extortion may be better off going to law enforcement rather than a bank.  Further, it might deter an individual from engaging in the initial misconduct in the first place, knowing that such actions may ultimately see the light of day, even decades later.

Still, as Mr. Goldman writes, Mr. Hastert is, at least in part, a victim.  And the decision to prosecute is different than a demand for jail time, which, under the plea agreement, is what prosecutors may seek.  Mr. Hastert’s conduct does not warrant jail time, as the collateral consequences of the prosecution itself are significant enough to deter at least some future would-be extortionists from engaging in blackmail and their victims from submitting to it.  This fact is all-too-often overlooked by prosecutors.

(SHL)

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/whitecollarcrime_blog/2015/10/why-hastert-had-to-be-prosecuted.html

Fraud, Money Laundering, News, Prosecutions, Prosecutors, Sentencing | Permalink

Comments

I agree with the well thought out points

Posted by: Frank Ciopobi | Oct 30, 2015 7:36:06 PM

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