Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Italian Accused of U.S. Antitrust Crime Extradited After Switching Planes in Germany

With the growing internationalization of business crime, the question of when a foreign national may be extradited to the United States for crimes charged in the United States is arising more frequently.  Generally speaking, under the requirement of "dual criminality," a resident of a foreign country charged in the United States will not be extradited if the country he is residing in does not deem his conduct criminal.  If, however, that person travels from his "safe haven" home country to another country (even in transit) where such conduct is criminal, he may be extradited.

As reported in a recent Wilmer Hale article, see here, Romano Pisciotti, an Italian citizen charged with an antitrust bid-rigging violation in 2010, this April was extradited from Germany after the connecting flight on his trip from Nigeria to Italy landed there.  Germany generally criminalizes bid-rigging; Italy generally does not.  Presumably, had Pisciotti not left Italy, he would not have been arrested. 

Pisciotti's extradition demonstrates that foreign residents indicted in the United States who are not extraditable from their home country (some nations, like Germany, will not extradite its own citizens other than to another European Union country or the International Criminal Court, for instance) take a considerable risk whenever they travel away from their country of residence.

(goldman)

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/whitecollarcrime_blog/2014/06/see-here.html

Antitrust, International, Prosecutions, Travel | Permalink

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