Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Ring Case - Commentary

The D.C. Court of Appeals rejected all of Kevin Ring’s appellate arguments, from his claims of an impropriety premised on the district court’s definition of what constitutes an "official act" to a claim of a  Federal Rule of Evidence 403 violation. The court’s findings include that "campaign contributions can be distinguished from other things of value." (see here). 

The court states "[t]he distinction between legal lobbying and criminal conduct may be subtle, but, as this case demonstrates, it spells the difference between honest politics and criminal corruption."  This sentence in the opinion concerns me.  Should a distinction that results in imprisonment be "subtle"?  "Googling" the word "subtle" a definition provided is "[s]o delicate or precise as to be difficult to analyze or describe."  And if this distinction is "subtle," should the rule of lenity be considered?  And should a "subtle" difference be considered to "spell[ ] the difference between honest politics and criminal corruption" or as this case finds - spell the difference between freedom and prison.

Irrespective of whether the movie Lincoln wins best picture, unlike Argo, Zero Dark Thirty, Silver Lining Playbook, and the other nominees, Steven Spielberg will be able to say that a federal appellate court has quoted the movie in its decision.  Yes, Hon.Tatel held that "[t]he ubiquity of these practices perhaps explains why in Steven Spielberg’s film Lincoln a lobbyist declared, "It is not illegal to bribe congressmen—they’d starve otherwise."

(esp)

January 29, 2013 in Judicial Opinions | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

D.C. Circuit Affirms Ring Decision

The D.C. Circuit affirmed the decision in the Kevin Ring case.  See here - Download Ring Decision Commentary to follow.

(esp)

January 29, 2013 in Judicial Opinions | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

In Memoriam: Murray Janis

by: Lawrence S. Goldman

Murray Janis, a dean of the Virginia and national criminal defense bars, passed away a few days ago.  Murray, a former president of the NACDL, was a superb lawyer highly respected and well loved by his peers.  He was a true gentlemen whose grace and smile lighted up a room.  He will be sorely missed but fondly remembered.

(goldman)

January 29, 2013 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, January 28, 2013

Casey Anthony Seeks Bankruptcy Protection for Legal Fees

by: Lawrence S. Goldman

Casey Anthony, who was acquitted of murdering her daughter Caylee Marie in 2011, has filed for bankruptcy in federal bankruptcy court in Florida.  She has listed approximate assets of $1,100 and debts of $800,000, including $500,000 due Jose Baez, one of her defense attorneys.  See here.  I was pleased to see no debt listed for my colleague and friend Cheney Mason, who as Baez' co-counsel, added gravitas, savvy and experience to Ms. Anthony's defense team.

It is not surprising for a criminal defense lawyer not to be paid a large part of the legal fees owed to her.  I venture that the average criminal defense lawyer is "beat" for some 10-20% of her fees.  And I do not know how much Baez actually did receive in fees, but I am sure nothing like the fees many white-collar lawyers and firms often receive for representation in criminal matters of institutions or individuals, even those who never get close to being indicted.  Of course, the Anthony case did provide Baez considerable fame.

(goldman)

January 28, 2013 in Attorney Fees, Current Affairs, Defense Counsel, News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)