Thursday, April 11, 2013

Administrative Judge Reverses Suspension of Stevens Prosecutors

by: Lawrence S. Goldman

An administrative judge for the Merit Systems Protection Board has overturned the DOJ internal decision finding reckless misconduct for violating Brady obligations by two prosecutors of Senator Ted Stevens, Joseph Bottini and James Goeke, and ordering their suspensions.  See here

The administrative judge ruled that DOJ had violated its own disciplinary procedures which require a rank-and-file DOJ attorney in the Professional Misconduct Review Unit to review OPR findings and determine whether misconduct had occurred.  The career attorney who reviewed the OPR findings, Terrence Berg (now a federal district judge in Michigan), decided in favor of the prosecutors, but his ruling was reviewed and reversed by his superiors, who found that misconduct had occurred and suspensions were appropriate.  Review and reversal by the superiors, said the administrative judge, was improper procedurally, and the rank-and file attorney's decision was non-reviewable and final.

I lack sufficient familiarity with administrative law to opine whether this decision is wrong  (although Prof. Bennett L. Gershman has made a strong case that it is).  See here.  I recognize that prosecutors, like those they prosecute, are entitled to due process.  However, procedural infirmities aside, the actions of the prosecutors were clear enough and serious enough to warrant on the merits a finding of misconduct and a suspension.  See here.

I find it ironic that DOJ's finding of misconduct was (according to the administrative judge) based on DOJ's own procedural misconduct.  More seriously, however, I find extremely troubling the notion that a DOJ prosecutor's misconduct should be finally determined by a fellow career DOJ prosecutor.  Defense lawyers, for instance, are not entitled to have their alleged misconduct weighed by a fellow defense lawyer.

A prosecutor's alleged misconduct ideally should be determined by the appropriate state bar disciplinary committee, not a fellow prosecutor (or fellow prosecutors).  Of course, bar disciplinary committees, as several commentators have pointed out, have been extraordinarily hesitant to discipline prosecutors, especially with respect to Brady violations.

DOJ has the right to appeal to the three-judge Merit Systems Protection Board.  It will be interesting to see if it does.

(goldman)

April 11, 2013 in Judicial Opinions, Legal Ethics, News, Prosecutors | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)