Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Judicial Oversight of Corporate Pleas -Protection of the Public Interest

United States v. Orthofix, Inc was an important decision for several reasons. First, the Memorandum  Opinion issued by Judge Young (D. Mass), on July 26, 2013, takes a turn in what typically happens when there is a corporate plea arrangement.   Second, the judge explains at length policy considerations for sentencing corporations.  The case also raises questions for the future of corporate plea agreements.  

This decision involves two cases involving corporate pleas where the court rejected the pleas.  The court notes the importance of considering the "public interest" in accepting pleas. Hon. Young states:

"Just as the Court must take account of the public interest when it exercises its discretion to fashion its own sentence, so too the Court must take account of the public interest when called upon to review a sentencing recommendation attached to a plea bargain."

The court considers the history behind plea bargains and contract law and notes the problem of considering it as a prosecution-defense relationship as opposed to a triadic relationship. Hon. Young states, that "this Court makes no attempt to question the policy choices of executive administrative agencies; it merely seeks to ensure that the sentence imposed upon Orthofix fosters (1) the protection of the public, (2) specific and general deterence, and (3) respect for the law."

The court states that "[o]rganizational criminals pose greater concerns than natural persons for two important reasons."  One of the concerns raised in the case of Orthofix, by the court, was that the plea of five years failed to impose the Corporate Integrity Agreement as part of the probation.

This Memorandum decision raises other interesting questions that were not discussed here, and perhaps not relevant to these matters. But one has to wonder whether courts should also be examining plea agreements that place undue pressure on corporations and individuals to plea because the risk of going to trial is too severe? In a post-Arthur Andersen world do corporations have the choice of risking a trial or is the necessity  of entering a plea too great to avoid the repercussions of an indictment and possible conviction? Should oversight of pleas go beyond the sentencing aspect to also scrutinze the bargaining position of the parties and the fairness of the general bargain?

See also Doug Berman's Sentencing Law & Policy Blog here, Jef Feeley & Janelle Lawrence, Bloomberg's,  Orthofix’s Settlement of Medicare Probe Rejected by Judge

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http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/whitecollarcrime_blog/2013/08/judicial-oversight-of-corporate-pleas.html

Arthur Andersen, Deferred Prosecution Agreements, Judicial Opinions, Prosecutions, Sentencing | Permalink

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