Friday, June 28, 2013

In the News & Around the Blogosphere

Amanda Bronstad, Nat L.J., Report: Bribery Prosecutions Revive Following 2012 Lag

Walter Pavlo, Forbes, The High Cost Of Mounting A White-Collar Criminal Defense

Covington & Burling, Senior DOJ Criminal Division Official Rejoins Covington (Daniel Suleiman)

Steptoe, Former DOJ Deputy Assistant Attorney General Jason Weinstein Joins Steptoe

Hunton & Williams, Hunton & Williams LLP Adds Former Federal Prosecutor Laura Marshall to
White Collar Team, Expands Global Litigation Practice

Bernie Madoff Exhibit Opens at Crime Museum here

Wiliiam Shepherd (Chair, ABA Criminal Justice Section; Hollad and Knight, partner), recently testified before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on the Judiciary Task Force on Overcriminalization.  See here and here.

DOJ Press Release, Former Congressman Richard G. Renzi Convicted of Extortion and Bribery in
Illegal Federal Land Swap

(esp)

June 28, 2013 in News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, June 27, 2013

First Circuit Holds That 18 U.S.C. Section 666 Doesn't Criminalize Gratuities

by: Solomon L. Wisenberg

The mark of the beast is fading a little, at least in the First Circuit. Amidst the hubbub of the Supreme Court's Wednesday rulings, the First Circuit quietly decided that 18 U.S.C. Section 666 can't be read to prohibit gratuities. This sets up a circuit split. The opinion in United States v. Fernandez & Maldanado is here.

Congratulations to Martin Weinberg, David Chesnoff, Kimberly Homan and Jose Pagan, who were on the brief for Appellant Bravo Fernandez. Congratulations to Abbe Lowell and Christopher Man, who were on the brief for Appellant Martinez Maldonado.

(wisenberg)

June 27, 2013 in Corruption, Fraud, Judicial Opinions, Prosecutions | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Supremes Strike Down the Government's Attempt to Stretch The Hobbs Act

In Sekhar v. United States, the Supreme Court looked at the question of "whether attempting to compel a person to recommend that his employer approve an investment constitutes 'the obtaining of property from another' under 18 U.S.C. s 1951(b)(2),"  the Hobbs Act.  The Hobbs Act has been a statute of choice for federal prosecutors in many white collar cases.  Its heavy penalty provisions offer increased sentence posibilities when the defendant knowingly and willfully induced someone to part with property by extorionate means and there has been interstate commerce. 

In Sekhar, the issue arose from an alleged threat to disclose an alleged affair following a general counsel's written recommendation to a state comptroller not to invest in a fund. Although the jury form offered three options of the possible property of the attempted extortion, the jury selected only the third option - "the General Counsel's recommendation to approve the Commitment." The Supreme Court reversed the Second Circuit finding that this was not extortion.

The Court issued an unanimous holding with three concurrences.  Justice Scalia, writing for the Court, stated that:

"As far as is known, no case predating the Hobbs Act - English, federal, or state - ever identified conduct such as that charged here as extiotionate.  Extortion required the obtaining of items of value, typically cash, from the victim."

 The opinion provides a wonderful history of the Hobbs Act, and highlights how "extortion" requires "obtaining property from another." The Court holds that "[t]he property extorted must therefore be transferable - that is, capable of passing from one person to another." Finding that the alleged property fails here, the Court reverses the convictions. The Court also goes on to say that you need "something of value." The Court states:

"The principle announced there [referencing its prior opinion in Scheidler] - that a defendant must pursue something of value from the victim that can be exercised, transferred, or sold - applies with equal force here. Whether one considers the personal right at issue to be property in a broad sense or not, it certainly was not obtainable property under the Hobbs Act." (footnotes omitted).

Citing to the prior decision in Cleveland, the Court holds that "an employee's yet-to-be-issued recommendation" is not obtainable property. Intangible property is not enough, it must be "obtainable property."

The Court emphasizes that coercion is not extortion, and Congress has not criminalized coercion in the Hobbs Act.

The three-person concurrence (Justices Alito, Kennedy, and Sotomayor), focuses on property and tries to limit the decision by saying that this case is an "outlier and that the jury's verdict stretches the concept of property beyond the breaking point." They reference the rule of lenity and although this concurrence agrees that Congress did not "classify internal recommendations pertaining to government decisions as property," they leave open the possibility that the government could perhaps have prosecuted "under some other theory."

My Commentary -  

Bottom line - the government stretched the statute and they were caught.

This decision offers defense counsel strong arguments and requests for instructions in Hobbs Act cases.  Limiting the definition of property to "obtainable property" and requiring a clear definition of when "something is of value" are likely to be requests coming from defense counsel in the future.

My advice to the government - -  there is real crime out there, please put our valuable resources into prosecuting it! 

(esp)  

June 26, 2013 in Judicial Opinions, Prosecutions | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Supreme Court Issues Decision in Hobbs Act Case

Sekhar v. United States here.   Commentary to follow.

(esp)

June 26, 2013 in Judicial Opinions | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

Kathleen F. Brickey

Washington University Law School reports the passing of Kathleen F. Brickey here. The New York Times here called her " the dean of the field."  She authored the first casebook in this area, wrote an incredible treatise on Corporate Criminal Liability, a book on Environmental Crimes and authored many articles in the white collar field. (see here). She served as the model professor and author for so many of us that came after her, entering a white collar scholarship world that was carved by her work. R.I.P.

(esp)

June 25, 2013 in Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Indigent Defense Crisis - White Collar Matters Could Be Implicated

According to a federal defender, "[f]ederal public defenders are facing unprecedented and devastating funding cuts in FY14, and the present plan would reduce budgets by 26% and staff by 33% nationally -- making these offices by far the hardest "hit" federal agency in the country."  A leading bar organization has issued a statement of concern.  The NACDL here notes that last week, "American's federal indigent defense system, known as the Office of Defender Services (ODS) was demoted."  In the year that marks the 50th Anniversary of the Gideon decision, this is sad. What is equally sad to see is that these moves are not cost effective, and could end up costing the taxpayers more.  As noted by a federal defender:

"Defender offices would lose some branch offices, have to decline the most complex and resource-intensive cases, cease managing the CJA (contract counsel) panel, and shift so many cases to the CJA lawyers that it would double or treble the CJA costs; note, however, that there has been no increase (rather, a decrease) in the CJA budget, and generally private CJA representation costs a lot more than representation by salaried staff in defender offices. Sequestration cuts to defender offices, ironically then, will substantially increase costs of federal indigent defense, while the Federal Defender offices (the "Flagship" of the U.S. Courts) are crippled."

White collar cases tend to be complex and require significant defense time and cost.  With the increased emphasis on cases, such as mortgage fraud, more federal public defenders have become involved in this representation. Without adequate defense counsel the status of prosecuting these cases could be at risk.  Equally problematic will be whether those charged with crimes will receive adequate representation. Let's hope the legislature wakes us and does something quickly to correct this situation.

(esp)

June 25, 2013 in Defense Counsel | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Second Circuit Affirms Rajaratnam Case - But Goes A Step Further in Supporting the Government

It's a relatively short opinion issued by the Second Circuit, and 24 of the 29 pages pertain to a summary of the holding, facts, and the wiretap order used in this case.  For background on the issues raised, the briefs (including amici briefs), see here. Judge Cabranes wrote the majority opinion, joined by judges Hon. Sack and Hon. Carney. A summary of the holding states:

In affirming his judgment of conviction, we conclude that: (1) the District Court properly analyzed the alleged misstatements and omissions in the government’s wiretap application under the analytical framework prescribed by the Supreme Court in Franks; (2) the alleged misstatements and omissions in the wiretap application did not require suppression, both because, contrary to the District Court’s conclusion, the government did not omit information about the SEC investigation of Rajaratnam with "reckless disregard for the truth," and because, as the District Court correctly concluded, all of the alleged misstatements and omissions were not "material"; and (3) the jury instructions on the use of inside information satisfy the "knowing possession" standard that is the law of this Circuit.

Some highlights and commentary:

1. The Second Circuit goes further than the district court in supporting the government's actions with respect to the wiretap order.

2.  The Second Circuit agrees with the lower court that a Franks hearing is the standard to be used with a wiretap order where there is a claim of misstatements and omissions in the government's wiretap application. The Second Circuit notes that the Supreme Court has "narrowed the circumstances in which ...[courts] apply the exclusionary rule."  But the question here is whether the Supreme Court has really addressed the wiretap question in this context and whether a cert petition will be forthcoming with this issue.

3. Although the Second Circuit uses the same basic test in reviewing the wiretap, it finds that "the District Court erred in applying the 'reckless disregard' standard because the court failed to consider the actual states of mind of the wiretap applicants."  The Second Circuit then goes a step further and finds that omission of evidence does not mean that the wiretap applicant acted with "reckless disregard for the truth."

4.  The court states that "the inference is particularly inappropriate where the government comes forward with evidence indicating that the omission resulted from nothing more than negligence, or that the omission was the result of considered and reasonable judgment that the information was not necessary to the wiretap application."  - This dicta provides the government with strong language in future cases when they just happen to negligently leave something out of a wiretap application.

5.  Does the CSX Transportation decision by the Supreme Court call into question Second Circuit precedent?  The Second Circuit is holding firm with its prior decisions.  But will the Supreme Court decide to take this on, and if so, will it take a different position.

Stay tuned.

(esp)

June 25, 2013 in Celebrities, Civil Enforcement, Judicial Opinions, Prosecutions, Prosecutors, SEC, Securities | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, June 24, 2013

The Wall Street Journal Takes Aim At Comey

by: Solomon L. Wisenberg

In what should be a surprise to no one, the Wall Street Journal editorial page today launched an attack on James Comey, President Obama's nominee to be the next FBI Director. The primary offenses? Comey's objection to the Bush Administration's illegal warrantless wiretapping and Comey's appointment of Patrick Fitzgerald as Special Counsel to investigate the Valerie Plame leak. The editorial is here. More commentary on this in the next few days.

Coming soon: Professor Podgor's analysis of the Second Circuit's opinion afffirming Raj Rajaratnam's conviction for insider trading violations.

(wisenberg)

June 24, 2013 in Current Affairs, Legal Ethics, Media, News, Plame Investigation, Prosecutions, Prosecutors, Statutes | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, June 21, 2013

Jeff Skilling Sentence Reduced To 14 Years

by: Solomon L. Wisenberg

Judge Lake effectively ratified the deal struck months ago by federal prosecutors and the former Enron CEO. The agreement called for a sentence of from 14 to 17.5 years. Skilling agreed to stop fighting his conviction and to hand over restitution funds to the victims. He obviously gets credit for time already served. WSJ has the story here.

(wisenberg)

June 21, 2013 in Arthur Andersen, Enron, Prosecutions, Prosecutors, Sentencing | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

DOJ Continues To Violate Brady Rule

by: Solomon L. Wisenberg

Despite all the promises and policy iterations we continue to see blatant DOJ Brady violations. These are violations that first year criminal procedure students would know not to commit. The latest to come to light is from the Eastern District of Tennessee.

Yesterday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit reversed Abel Tavera's conviction for conspiracy to distribute meth and possession with intent to distribute meth. Tavera was the passenger in a truck involved in an undercover drug deal. He plausibly claimed no knowledge of the drug transaction, testifying that he thought he was heading to a roofing job. Some of the physical evidence tended to corroborate Tavera's story. The evidence against Tavera was almost entirely bottomed on the testimony of co-defendant Granado. Non-testifying co-defendant Mendoza debriefed. He first told the government that Tavera had no knowledge of the drug transaction. Later the same day Mendoza told the government that Tavera only gained knowledge of the drug transaction upon entering the truck on the day of the transaction. Mendoza also denied that Tavera came along to count money and provide security, and consistently stated that one of the purposes of the truck ride was to work on a roofing job. All of this was contradictory to Granado's ultimate testimony. Mendoza later pled guilty. Mendoza's written plea agreement stated: "Tavera knew that they were transporting methamphetamine from North Carolina to be delivered to another person in Tennessee and agreed to accompany [Mendoza]. Since they were transporting methamphetamine, Tavera told [Mendoza] that they needed to be careful." The prosecutor, AUSA Donald Taylor, failed to disclose Mendoza's earlier debriefing statements to the defense.

Judge Merritt, speaking for the majority, decided to send a message:

"This particular case is not close. Prosecutor Taylor's failure to disclose Mendoza's statements resulted in a due process violation. We therefore vacate Tavera's conviction and remand for a new trial. In addition, we recommend that the U.S. Attorney's office for the Eastern District of Tennessee conduct an investigation of why the prosecutorial error occurred and make sure that such Brady violations do not continue."

Tavera's attorney never tried to interview Mendoza. The government argued that no Brady violation occurred, under Sixth Circuit precedent. because Mendoza was equally available to both sides. The majority disagreed with this contention,and further found it foreclosed by the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in Banks v. Dretke, 540 U.S. 668 (2004). Judge Clay accepted the government's position regarding Sixth Circuit precedent and dissented.

The statements were plainly material and exculpatory. So the question remains, why is such conduct continuing to occur and what is the DOJ doing about it when it comes to light? Here, what one branch of the DOJ did was to argue that Brady wasn't violated.

These constitutional violations directly affect the fairness of federal criminal trials. They will never stop, absent legislation with teeth and/or a federal criminal defense bar willing to be fanatical in its intolerance of Brady violations.

Here is the decision in United States v. Tavera.

(wisenberg)

June 21, 2013 in Judicial Opinions, Obstruction, Prosecutions, Prosecutors | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

New SEC Policy On Admissions Of Wrongdoing: Tangibles And Intangibles

by: Solomon L. Wisenberg

SEC Chair Mary Jo White has announced an end to the SEC's blanket "does not admit or deny" settlement agreement policy. In a select number of cases involving "widespread harm to investors" or "egregious intentional misconduct" the Commission will now insist on admissions of wrongdoing on the part of civil defendants who want to settle. The blanket policy was previously eroded, in January 2012, in cases where settling defendants had already pled guilty to related criminal charges. Yesterday's Reuters story is here. Todays Thomson Reuters News & Insight analysis is here.

I strongly suspect that the tangible impact of the policy shift will be minimal. Since almost no SEC civil defendants can afford to admit wrongdoing as a condition of settlement (except in cases where a guilty plea occurred or is anticipated), we can expect the instances in which the SEC will insist on such admissions to be extremely rare. And those very rare cases will result in trials.

But the intangible impact of annually insisting on admissions of wrongdoing in three or four cases may be greater over time. First, the trials, though few in number, should be well-covered by the media. Second, the SEC will regain some much needed respect for its toughness. Third, going to trial and airing the dirty laundry accumulated by malefactors of great wealth should have salutary educational and public policy benefits. Fourth, we may actually see some deterrent effect from all this, so that companies don't automatically view SEC settlements as a cost of doing business.

We will revisit this issue as the new policy is implemented.

(wisenberg)

June 19, 2013 in AIG, SEC, Securities, Settlement | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Non-arrested Person Asserting Right to Silence Must Assert Constitution

by: Lawrence S. Goldman

In Salinas v. Texas, the Supreme Court in a bizarre, unrealistic 5-4 (or more precisely 3/2-4) decision announced yesterday seemed to rule that the pre-arrest silence of a person not in custody may be introduced at trial against that person and commented upon in summation by the prosecutor -- unless that person specifically invoked his Fifth Amendment privilege against self-incrimination.  Justice Thomas, joined by Justice Scalia, concurred only in the result, arguing that Griffin v. California, 380 U.S. 609 (1965), which prohibited prosecutorial use of a defendant's invocation of silence at trial, should not be extended to pre-arrest situations.

According to Justice Alito and two others (Chief Justice Roberts and Justice Kennedy), the individual had the responsibility to demonstrate at the time of his invocation of silence that it was based on his constitutional rights.  ("[I]t would have been a simple matter for him to say that he was not answering the officer's questions on Fifth Amendment grounds.")  Much like a trial lawyer, the defendant thus had the responsibility to make a proper contemporaneous record or forfeit any future legal claim.  ("A witness's constitutional right to refuse to answer questions depends on his reasons for doing so, and the courts need to know those reasons to evaluate the merits of a Fifth Amendment claim.")  Thus, the rules for making a record for a defendant represented by counsel in a courtroom have apparently been extended to an uncounseled layperson on the street or in a police station.

Salinas may affect the advice a white-collar lawyer (or any lawyer) might provide to a non-arrested client who the lawyers suspect might be approached by a law enforcement agent.  Instead of advising the client merely to decline to speak with the law enforcement official, the lawyer should also probably advise the client to explicitly state that his refusal is based on the Fifth (and perhaps also the Sixth) Amendment.  Indeed, perhaps white-collar lawyers should follow the lead of some other criminal lawyers and print the invocation of the Fifth (and Sixth) on the reverse side of their business cards.

(goldman) 

June 18, 2013 in News, Privileges | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, June 17, 2013

A Great Moment In The History Of The FBI

by: Solomon L. Wisenberg

This makes me so damn proud to be an American. What a righteous Department of Justice we have! Always going after the malefactors of great wealth. And God Bless the Fan Belt Inspectors too. No crime is too small for the Bureau to root out.

Kudos to John Cook of Gawker.com for posting this item and to Anthony Colleluori for bringing it to my attention.

(wisenberg)

June 17, 2013 in Corruption, Fraud | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, June 13, 2013

Circuit Report

by: Solomon L. Wisenberg

Today in U.S. v. Cherry, the Fourth Circuit held that it was plain error for a trial court to tell the jury about the defendant's inadmissible criminal history prior to polling the jurors. Alas, the error was harmless, given the overwhelming evidence of guilt. The offending jurist was Senior District Judge Robert Doumar of the Eastern District of Virginia (Norfolk Division), who informed the jurors of defendant's three prior criminal convictions immediately after the verdict, but prior to polling. The Fourth Circuit opinion was authored by Judge Allyson  Duncan.

(wisenberg)

June 13, 2013 in Judicial Opinions | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Shargel to Join Winston & Strawn

by: Lawrence S. Goldman

Gerald Shargel, perhaps the pre-eminent criminal defense lawyer in New York City, has left his solo practice to join the 900-lawyer firm of Winston & Strawn.  Shargel's move is embelmatic of two trends:  the expansion of white-collar and not so white-collar criminal defense practices of large firms and the exodus of criminal practioners from solo or small partnership practices.

Mr. Shargel's transition is a boon to Winston & Strawn but a loss to the independent, private defense bar that is diminishing in number, income and quality.

(goldman)

June 12, 2013 in Defense Counsel, News | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, June 9, 2013

"'We the people' are the boiling frog, and the water has started to boil."

by: Solomon L. Wisenberg

The wonderful John Wesley Hall concisely explains, at Welcome to the Fourth Amendment.com, the decades-long erosion of our Fourth Amednment rights, at the hands of the Supreme Court and a succession of do-nothing Congresses. No surprises here, as Hall laments: 

"What is Congress doing? Essentially nothing. Proposing a law with great fanfare is meaningless if it goes nowhere. I wrote my Senators about email privacy, so I figure they don’t care since they never wrote back. So, I haven’t bothered to write to them about Sen. Paul’s bills. Congress is too mired in gamesmanship to do their damned jobs of actually legislating in the public interest."

***

"Now, what are we going to do about it? Complain, but sit on or wring our hands and do nothing?"

Hat Tip to NACDL's tireless weekend warrior, Ivan J. Dominguez, for sending this out. Similar points were made on Friday by the inimitable Scott Greenfield at Simple Justice in Seize It All And Trust the Government To Sort IT Out:

"Yet all the hand-wringing interest today will fade and we will elect the same men and women to power to continue to re-enact the same laws that allow the government to do such things to its own people, and presidents who believe so strongly in their own exceptionalism that they can be trusted with our personal data even though the other team could never be."

Cheery thoughts for a Sunday afternoon.

(wisenberg)

June 9, 2013 in Congress, Current Affairs, Judicial Opinions, Searches | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Sideshow: DC District Court Staff's Failure to Unseal the James Rosen Affidavit

by: Solomon L. Wisenberg

FBI Special Agent Reginald Reyes' affidavit supporting DOJ's search warrant application for Fox News Reporter James Rosen's Google email account was ordered unsealed in November 2011. But it wasn't actually unsealed by the DC U.S. District Court's staff until late May of 2013. In other words, the affidavit was only unsealed several days after AG Holder testified that, "[w]ith regard to potential prosecution of the press for the disclosure of material, that is not something that I have ever been involved in, heard of, or would think would be a wise policy." Once the affidavit and search warrant application were unsealed, it became clear that Holder's testimony was inacurrate, as he had personally authorized the search warrant application. See here for yesterday's post on this issue.

DC Chief Judge Royce Lamberth is not happy about his staff's failure to unseal the affidavit and related documents. Here is Chief Judge Royce Lamberth's 5-23-2013 Order expressing his unhappiness.

(wisenberg)

June 5, 2013 in Congress, Current Affairs, Investigations, Judicial Opinions, Legal Ethics, Perjury, Prosecutions, Prosecutors | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

The Holder Mess

by: Solomon L. Wisenberg

“Well, I would say this. With regard to potential prosecution of the press for the disclosure of material, that is not something that I have ever been involved in, heard of, or would think would be a wise policy.” Attorney General Eric Holder testifying under oath before the House Judiciary Committee on May 15, 2013.

"For the reasons set forth below, I believe there is probable cause to conclude that the contents of the wire and electronic communications pertaining to SUBJECT ACCOUNT, are evidence, fruits and instrumentalities of criminal violations of 18 U.S.C. [Section] 793 (Unauthorized Disclosure of National Defense Information), and that there is probable cause to believe that the Reporter has committed or is committing a violation of section 793(d), as an aider and abettor and/or co-conspirator to which the materials relate." FBI Special Agent Reginald B. Reyes' May 28, 2010, Affidavit in Support of Search Warrant Application for Fox News Chief Washington Correspondent James Rosen's Google email account. The warrant was authorized by Attorney General Holder.

Note than in addition to identifying "the Reporter" as a probable aider, abettor and/or criminal co-conspirator, the affidavit explains that the Department of Justice is not bound by the Privacy Protection Act, otherwise prohibiting warrants for First Amendment work product, precisely because "the Reporter" was "suspected of committing the crime [18 U.S.C. Section 793(d)] under investigation."

There is no doubt that AG Holder gave false testimony to House Members under oath. He is an idiot if he did so intentionally, and he isn't an idiot. What should Holder have done to fix this mess? Corrected the record, of course. In the immortal words of Richard Nixon, "that would have been the easy thing to do."

Holder should have said: "Dear Representatives Goodlatte and Sensenbrenner. I screwed up. My testimony to you is now inoperative. I forgot that I authorized this affidavit, which clearly identifies a 'Reporter' as somebody under investigation for a crime. I did not intentionally try to deceive you. My statement was careless and overbroad. Please accept my apologies."

But the Attorney General apparently cannot not bring himself to do anything as straightforward as that. Instead he spends days sending out spinmeisters, most recently, and regrettably, Deputy Assistant AG Peter Kadzik, as reported here by Sari Horwitz in today's Washington Post.

How sad. Can you imagine anything like this happending under Attorney General Griffin Bell? Bell, a genuine protector of our civil liberties, most likely would have nixed the supboena in the first place. But if Bell had authorized it, he never would have shied away from the ensuing controversy or hidden behind his DOJ underlings.

Mr. Holder has received his fair share of undeserved, demagogic criticism from the kooky right. He deserves what he's getting now. 

Here is a copy of the Reyes Affidavit.

(wisenberg)

June 4, 2013 in Congress, Current Affairs, Investigations, Legal Ethics, Perjury, Prosecutions, Prosecutors | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Saturday, June 1, 2013

AUSA Bill Baumann (1950-2013)

by: Solomon L. Wisenberg

Federal prosecutors come and go. Some are good. Some are bad. One of the really good ones died this week. Bill Baumann joined the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Western District of Texas in 1989--the same year I did. He stayed on until Tuesday, May 28, 2013, when he passed away after a valiant six-month struggle with brain cancer. Bill was the quintessential AUSA lifer, in the best sense of that word. Intelligent, hard working, competent, even-tempered, professional, and proud of what he did for a living. He could be a hard-ass, but the defense bar considered him a fair one. Bill was a great colleague to his fellow AUSAs, who will sorely miss him and his sunny disposition. Here is the obituary. Rest in Peace.

(wisenberg)

June 1, 2013 | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)