Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Ninth Circuit Looks at Selective Waiver

In In re: Pacific Pictures the Ninth Circuit looks at "whether a party waives attorney-client privilege forever by voluntarily disclosing privileged documents to the federal government." The court starts with the principle that "voluntarily disclosing privileged documents to third parties will generally destroy the privilege."  The court rejects the petitioners argument that disclosing documents to the government is different from disclosing them to civil litigants and that a selective waiver should apply. The court notes that legislative attempts to change the evidence rules to allow for selective waiver have failed so far.

The court also does not enforce a confidentiality letter between the corporation and the government. The court states:

"The only justification behind enforcing such agreements would be to encourage cooperation with the government.  But Congress has declined to adopt even this limited form of selective waiver."

The court rejected a claim that "adopting such a rule will drastically impair law enforcement attempts to investigate espionage against 'attorneys, financial institutions, medical providers, national security agencies, judges, large corporations, or law firms.'"

Entities provide significant materials to the government as part of deferred and non-prosecution agreements. Not having a privilege needs to be considered by corporate counsel in deciding what to give to the government.

(esp)

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/whitecollarcrime_blog/2012/05/ninth-circuit-looks-at-selective-waiver-.html

Civil Litigation, Deferred Prosecution Agreements, Judicial Opinions, Privileges | Permalink

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