Thursday, January 20, 2011

Siegelman & Scrushy - Post Skilling - Is 1346 Really Necessary?

The Skilling case proved consequential in the discussion before the the Eleventh Circuit in the Siegelman and Scrushy cases. Check out this story on the oral argument -

John Schwartz, NYTimes, Judges Take Another Look at Ex-Alabama Governor’s Conviction

Some may claim that it is cases like this that should influence Congress to re-examine section 1346. Perhaps - but only to void the entire statute as recommended by Justice Scalia. One lesson that should be learned from both the McNally case, and now Skilling is that if the government is criminalizing conduct, it is necessary to require strict legal lines and those lines should not cross into legitimate conduct. 1346 should be voided because it is unnecessary.  The basic mail fraud statute, 1341, and wire fraud, 1343, as well as the other fraud statutes, criminalize deprivations of "money or property."  The Supreme Court has clearly held that "money or property" includes intangible property (Cleveland). To include "intangible rights" is therefore unnecessary for the prosecution of criminal misconduct. If the self-dealing does not involve money or property, should we really waste government resources on the prosecution?

(esp)

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/whitecollarcrime_blog/2011/01/siegelman-scrushy-post-skilling-is-1346-really-necessary.html

Fraud, HealthSouth | Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341bfae553ef0147e1c6c780970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Siegelman & Scrushy - Post Skilling - Is 1346 Really Necessary?:

Comments

Post a comment