Wednesday, March 5, 2008

How Not to Ask Questions

Perjury is definitely in the news these days, with the FBI investigating Roger Clemens for his statements before a Congressional committee and Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick's testimony in a whistleblower lawsuit denying a relationship with an aide under review by the local prosecutors office.  One of the highest profile perjury cases involves home run king (and apparently unwanted free agent) Barry Bonds, whose charges was dismissed by U.S. District Judge Susan Illston because of flaws in the indictment.  Judge Illston ordered the release of the transcript of Bonds' grand jury testimony in 2003 (available below) that now reveals the entirety of the nearly three-hour examination by two Assistant U.S. Attorneys. 

While the indictment presents Bonds in a bad light by isolating specific instances of allegedly false answers, skimming through the full transcript shows just how disorganized the prosecutors seemed to be, and how at least one of them couldn't ask a simple question.  Whether it was nervousness or perhaps being intimidated by Bonds, the questions come across almost like a stream of consciousness approach to the examination.  Here's just one example of the kind of questions Bonds faced: "Let me ask the same question about Greg at this point, we'll go into this in a bit more detail, but did you ever get anything else from Greg besides advice or tips on your weight lifting and also the vitamins and the proteins that you already referenced?" (Pg. 23)  Huh?  Understanding that a transcript does not necessarily convey the full flavor of the actual interchanges, in reading through the questioning I'm struck by how convoluted the questions are, punctuated throughout with "I mean," "you know," and similar distracting phrases.

What makes perjury so difficult to prove is that the allegedly false answer is not necessarily the most important thing.  As the Supreme Court noted in Bronston v. United States, 409 U.S. 352 (1973), "Precise questioning is imperative as a predicate for the offense of perjury."  Among the questions recited in the original indictment was this model of obfuscatory inquiry: "So, I guess I got to ask the question again, I mean, did you take steroids?  And specifically this test the [sic] is in November 2000.  So I'm going to ask you in the weeks and months leading up to November 2000  were you taking steroids . . . or anything like that?" 

Prosecutors will no doubt come back with a new indictment of Bonds in the next couple weeks, one which is honed down and focused on just single questions and answers to avoid the duplicity problem that led to the dismissal.  But they can only work with the transcript they have, and finding a clear question -- and answer -- may be quite a challenge.  The questioning of Bonds was not a model of how to set a perjury trap, if that was the goal in having him testify. (ph)

Download us_v_bonds_grand_jury_transcript_bonds.pdf

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Comments

The prosecutors are in a pickle if they try to re-indict Bonds. You can't charge a person with the same crime twice. This is a demostration of an Administration that replaced qualified USAs with boneheads. Makes you wonder why they fired USA Ryan who was the original prosecutor in the Barry Bonds case.

Posted by: SP Biloxi | Mar 5, 2008 4:31:17 PM

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