Thursday, February 21, 2008

Société Générale Isn't Too Hard On Itself Despite Losing $7.2 Billion

When you are the victim of a $7.2 billion fraud perpetrated by an employee, one would think that there would be a fair measure of self-criticism for not detecting the misconduct.  French banking giant Société Générale issued an progress report (available below) on its internal investigation, called "Mission Green," into the losses caused by rogue trader Jerome Kerviel, based on the work of its General Inspection department -- which sounds like the equivalent of the internal auditors -- and reviewed by PriceWaterhouseCoopers.  While Kerviel's unauthorized trades began in 2005 or 2006, they increased substantially in size in March 2007, and went undetected until mid-January 2008.  That's nine months in which he took increasingly risky positions, estimated to total as much as 50 billion euros at the peak. 

The obvious question is how Kerviel could get away with trading such huge amounts when he was a fairly low-level trader dealing in a narrow range of market indexes.  The progress report is not particularly critical, making Kerviel's trading the result of what almost seems like just minor oversight glitch:

The General Inspection department believes that, on the whole, the controls provided by the support and control functions were carried out in accordance with the procedures, but did not make it possible to identify the fraud before January 18th 2008. The failure to identify the fraud until that date can be attributed firstly to the efficiency and variety of the concealment techniques employed by the fraudster, secondly to the fact that operating staff did not systematically carry out more detailed checks, and finally to the absence of certain controls that were not provided for and which might have identified the fraud. The Inspection General department has refrained from drawing any conclusions at this stage regarding the responsibility of the front office managers supervising the fraud's author, given the ongoing legal investigation which has not enabled it to interview all those concerned. At this stage of the investigations, there is no evidence of embezzlement or internal or external complicity (i.e. the existence of a third party who knowingly assisted the fraudster to conceal his positions).The investigations are continuing, in particular, to cover a wider area than the activities of the author of the fraud. [Italics added]

Société Générale may give itself only a B- in the internal controls department, but it's hard to see any oversight system that misses such a large amount of unauthorized trading for nearly nine months as anything other than a  abject failure.  The bank continues to maintain that Kerviel acted alone, and to this point it hasn't identified any accomplices nor even any theft or personal enrichment from the trading.  Kerviel admitted his role in the transactions, but asserts that there were warning signs about what he was doing that were ignored by his superiors, or perhaps even worse, they acquiesced in his conduct because at one point he had generated profits for Société Générale of over 1 billions euros.  An International Herald Tribune story (here) discusses the report. (ph)

Download socit_gnrale_progress_report_feb_20_2008.pdf

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/whitecollarcrime_blog/2008/02/socit-gnrale-gi.html

Fraud, International, Investigations | Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341bfae553ef00e55070570a8834

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Société Générale Isn't Too Hard On Itself Despite Losing $7.2 Billion:

Comments

Is there an English translation of the internal report available anywhere?

Posted by: Dave | Feb 22, 2008 9:14:46 AM

Dave, try this link to the SocGen home page

http://www.sp.socgen.com/sdp/sdp.nsf/V3ID/6D44E7AEF3D68993C12573F700567904/$file/comiteSpecialFevrier08gb.pdf

Posted by: Christopher Hayes | Feb 27, 2008 3:20:55 AM

Post a comment