Friday, June 2, 2006

Journalists Subpoenaed in the Bonds Perjury Investigation

A New York Times article (here) discusses a motion to quash grand jury subpoenas issued to the two San Francisco Chronicle journalists who broke the story about the grand jury testimony of San Francisco Giants slugger Barry Bonds in the Balco (Bay Area Laboratory Cooperative) steroids investigation.  The journalists are co-authors of the book Game of Shadows that contains a number of detailsdescribing alleged steroid use by Bonds.  The Times article discusses the affidavit submitted by Mark Corallo, former Department of Justice spokesman for Attorney General Ashcroft, blasting the issuance to subpoenas to journalists for information about confidential sources absent a significant need related to national security or a threat of harm to innocent third-parties.

While most of the attention has been on the issue of the propriety of journalist subpoenas, the fact that federal prosecutors have taken such a dramatic step may indicate that the Bonds investigation is in its final stages.  Subpoenaing journalists to track down confidential sources who may be eyewitnesses to possible steroid use by Bonds seems to show that, to this point, the government does not have enough independent evidence to make a perjury case.  Bonds denied having knowingly used steroids before the grand jury in 2003, and prosecutors would have to prove the falsity of those statements and not merely that they were not completely truthful.  The grand jury has heard from Bonds' personal physician and a Giants team trainer, but it is unlikely that they would have direct evidence of any steroids use.  Bonds' personal trainer, Greg Anderson, may have testified about what Bonds put into his body, but having pled guilty in the Balco case, Anderson's testimony may not be sufficiently credible to warrant a perjury prosecution.  Similarly, a former supposed girlfriend of Bonds would have similar issues if she were a government witness. 

Issuing subpoenas to journalists looks like a last -- and possibly desperate -- step to build the perjury case.  Whether the government can obtain what it wants remains to be seen. (ph)

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/whitecollarcrime_blog/2006/06/subpoenaing_jou.html

Grand Jury, Investigations, Perjury | Permalink

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