Wednesday, February 1, 2012

Rutgers-Camden Conference on Bad Faith

Last year, Rutgers-Camden became one of the few law schools to have 2 or more insurance experts on faculty when it hired Adam Scales (Jay Feinman has taught there for years).  Now the school continues its focus on insurance by hosting "Bad Faith and Beyond" on February 29th.  In addition to Adam and Jay, speakers include:  Ken Abraham, Tom Baker, Robert Jerry, Ellen Pryor, Doug Richmond, and Peter Siegelman.  Details are here.

--CJR

February 1, 2012 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, January 24, 2012

Register for "Mass Torts in the Federal Courts" - Charleston, Feb. 24th

The Federal Courts Law Review at the Charleston School of Law is sponsoring a symposium on "Mass Torts in the Federal Courts" on February 24, 2012, in Charleston.

Ken Feinberg will be giving the keynote address. Panels will address preemption, aggregation issues in mass torts, and ethical issues surrounding fees and settlements in mass tort cases.   Speakers include Lynnn Baker (Texas), Alexandra Lahav (UConn), Linda Mullenix (Texas), Morris Ratner (Hastings), and Cathy Sharkey (NYU).

Registration is now open:  Download Mass Torts 2012 Registration Form

A copy of the agenda is also available:   Download SymposiumMailer-1-1

- SBS 

January 24, 2012 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Calnan: Four Quandaries for Civil Recourse Theory

Alan Calnan (Southwestern) offers the following post on civil recourse theory:

At the upcoming AALS conference, the Torts and Compensation Section will host a panel discussion on civil recourse theory entitled: Twenty-First Century Tort Theories: A New Audit of Civil Recourse Theory. In short, civil recourse theory holds that Torts is a system of constitutionally mandated (due process) rights permitting victims to sue for remedies to rectify legal wrongs. Although the proponents of this theory have elaborated its features in copious detail, they have yet to address several questions essential to its sustainability. Four questions, in particular, create especially troublesome quandaries. I pose these quandaries below in the hope of stimulating thought and discussion at January’s conference.

  1. How can civil recourse theory be viewed as an accurate, complete, and unified description of tort law when it ignores both the numerous instrumental (nonwrongs-based) theories of strict liability, and the pervasive instrumental (nonwrongs-based) considerations actively shaping and transforming wrongs-based theories like negligence?
  2. How can the right to sue (take recourse) in tort be premised on the existence of a legal wrong if (1) the determination of a legal wrong typically is not made until long after the action is filed, and (2) often (in at least 50% of tried cases) results in a finding that no wrong in fact was done?
  3. How can tort law best be understood as empowering victims to rectify civil wrongs (as stated in the panel summary) when the very purpose of both the law’s substance (which specifies things the plaintiff MUST prove to rectify a wrong) and its procedure (which specifies things the plaintiff MUST do to pursue such rectification) is to create impediments for the party seeking recourse and protections for the party being sued?
  4. How does the “constitutional” right to civil recourse square with the historic due process right to protect citizens from arbitrary state action, including presumably the state’s action of taking sides in a private dispute by hosting and facilitating one party’s unproven, liberty-infringing (civil) attack against another?

--CJR

December 21, 2011 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, November 25, 2011

Tort News from Europe

New books
 
Tort Law in the Jurisprudence of the ECtHR (ed A Fenyves et al) [read more] [publisher website]
Digest of European Tort Law, Vol 2 – Essential Cases on Damage (ed B Winiger et al) [read more] [publisher website]
European Tort Law Yearbook 2010 (ed H Koziol/BC Steininger) [read more] [publisher website]
 
Also published 2011
 
Medical Liability in Europe (ed BA Koch) [read more] [publisher website]
European Tort Law: Basic Texts (ed K Oliphant/BC Steininger) [read more] [publisher website]
 
11th Annual Conference on European Tort Law
  
The Annual Conference on European Tort Law provides practitioners and academics with information about the most significant tort law developments in Europe in the preceding year. Next year's conference will take place in Vienna from Thursday, April 12 to Saturday April 14, 2012. [read more] Details of the full conference programme will be provided shortly.
 
Thanks to Ken Oliphant for the tip.
 
--CJR

November 25, 2011 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, November 18, 2011

Indiana Law Journal to Publish AALS Torts Panel Pieces

The Indiana Law Journal will publish, in its volume 88, the articles written in conjunction with the AALS Torts & Compensation Section panel ("Twenty-First Century Tort Theories:  A New Audit of Civil Recourse Theory") at the 2012 Annual Meeting in D.C.

--CJR

November 18, 2011 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, October 27, 2011

Torts at AALS

The Torts & Compensation System section of AALS has announced its program for the 2012 conference, and it features our very own Chris Robinette.  Here's the description:

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM January 5
[4150] Section on Torts and Compensation Systems
Maryland Suite A, Lobby Level, Washington Marriott Wardman Park Hotel
 
Twenty-First Century Tort Theories: A New Audit of Civil Recourse Theory
 
Moderator: Michael L. Rustad, Suffolk University Law School
Speakers: Guido Calabresi, Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals, 2nd Circuit, New York, NY
Martha E. Chamallas, The Ohio State University, Michael E. Moritz College of Law
John C. Goldberg, Harvard Law School
Christopher J. Robinette, Widener University School of Law
Benjamin C. Zipursky, Fordham University School of Law
 
Recently, civil recourse theory has emerged as an attempt to unify tort law around the concept of private wrongs. By arguing that the point of tort law is to empower victims to rectify civil wrongs against them, civil recourse theory offers an elegant means to reduce the plurality of theories that have dominated tort scholarship since the 1970’s. This panel will explore the implications of paring down tort law to civil recourse. Professors Goldberg and Zipursky, who have been pioneers in developing civil recourse theory, will present the concepts and methods of this theory. Judge Calabresi, the 2010 Prosser Award recipient, will explore the implications of deemphasizing loss spreading and deterrence. Professor Chamallas will examine civil recourse theory drawing upon her work on how race, gender, and class interrelate with tort law developments. Finally, Professor Robinette will address the question of whether civil recourse can unify the law focusing on whether it is a complete account. Panelists will also address whether tort law should have a public
purpose beyond civil recourse.
 
Business Meeting at Program Conclusion.

--BC (who will, alas, be in Orlando to run the Disney Half Marathon that weekend)

October 27, 2011 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, October 18, 2011

Judge Posner to Receive 2012 Prosser Award

From the AALS Torts and Compensation Section's Executive Committee: 

 The William Prosser award will be presented at our Section meeting on January 5, 2012 at 9-12 pm.  The Prosser Award was created and presented to its first recipient, Leon Green, in 1974. Later awardees included Fleming James Jr., Wex Malone, W. Page Keeton, John Wade and Willard Pedrick.  More recent honorees include Dan B. Dobbs, Guido Calabresi, Oscar Gray, and Robert Rabin.

 
 When Wex Malone bestowed the first Prosser award upon Leon Green, Malone remarked that the award “is designed to recognize a lifetime of truly outstanding contribution to the world of Torts.”

This year’s honoree – the Hon. Richard A. Posner, Judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and Senior Lecturer in Law at the University of Chicago Law School-has authored academic works as well as judicial opinions that have reshaped the way we think and teach about tort law.   One nominator wrote that “Judge Posner returned Torts to its special position as one of the most exciting, intellectually challenging, and magnetic fields of study in all of the legal academy.” Judge Posner’s writings provide law teachers and scholars with an analytical framework to approach many tort law issues.   A nominator mentioned how Posner developed a grand theory of tort law beginning with his 1972 article, “A Theory of Negligence.” Judge Posner’s judicial opinions and academic writing have reshaped the way torts teacher teach and think about setting the standard of care.   
 
 First year law students learn the law and economics perspective on tort law through appellate cases authored by Judge Richard Posner.  A nominator described Judge Posner as having the “Holmesian gift of utilizing the sharp tools of a brilliant academic mind to craft insightful and eloquent judicial opinions.”
           
 The Executive Committee would like to extend our congratulations to our respected colleague whose doctrinal and theoretical work has been so influential.  We would also like to acknowledge his role as a mentor to younger torts scholars and teachers.
  
--CJR

October 18, 2011 in Conferences, TortsProfs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, October 17, 2011

Gender & Torts Scholarship

Bridget Crawford posts, at Feminst Law Professors, asking where the women are in a recent torts symposium published by the William Mitchell Law Review (in which one out of fourteen participants is female), and links to a 2009 post from Ann Bartow noting another symposium with zero female participants.

--BC

October 17, 2011 in Conferences, Current Affairs, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, October 13, 2011

"New Private Law" at Harvard

Next Friday, Harvard is hosting a conference on the New Private Law.  TortsProf John Goldberg is leading a roundtable discussion.  The torts portion of the conference is:

Panel #4 – Tort Law: 12:10 – 1:00

Presenter: Benjamin Zipursky, Fordham University School of Law

Moderator: Arthur Ripstein, University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Commentator: Keith Hylton, Boston University School of Law (Visiting Professor, Harvard Law School)

Commentator: John Oberdiek, Rutgers School of Law – Camden

The full schedule is available from Larry Solum at LTB.

--CJR

October 13, 2011 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

AALS Torts & Compensation Section Panel on Civil Recourse Theory

The 2012 AALS Annual Meeting Torts & Compensation Section meeting will include a panel on civil recourse theory scheduled for Thursday, January 5th at 9:00 a.m.  

Twenty-First Century Tort Theories:  A New Audit of Civil Recourse Theory

Recently, civil recourse theory has emerged as an attempt to unify tort law around the concept of private wrongs. By arguing that the point of tort law is to empower victims to rectify civil wrongs against them, civil recourse theory offers an elegant means to reduce the plurality of theories that have dominated tort scholarship since the 1970’s. This panel will explore the implications of paring down tort law to civil recourse.  John Goldberg and Benjamin Zipursky, who have been pioneers in developing civil recourse theory, will present the concepts and methods of this theory. Guido Calabresi, the 2010 Prosser Award recipient, will explore the implications of deemphasizing loss-spreading and deterrence. Martha Chamallas will examine civil recourse theory drawing upon her work on how race, gender, and class interrelate with tort law developments. Finally, Christopher Robinette will address the question of whether civil recourse can unify the law focusing on whether it is a complete account.  Panelists will also address whether tort law should have a public purpose beyond civil recourse.

 

Speakers
Speaker: Guido Calabresi, Yale Law School U.S. Court of Appeals, 2nd Circuit
Speaker: Martha E. Chamallas, The Ohio State University Michael E. Moritz College of Law
Speaker: John C.P. Goldberg, Harvard Law School
Speaker: Christopher J. Robinette, Widener University School of Law
Moderator: Michael L. Rustad, Suffolk University Law School
Speaker: Benjamin C. Zipursky, Fordham University School of Law

--CJR

September 14, 2011 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, September 9, 2011

Call for Papers/Conference Announcement: "The Paisley Snail"

An international torts conference will be held in May 2012 in Scotland celebrating the 80th anniversary of Donoghue v. Stevenson.

University of the West of Scotland, Renfrewshire Law Centre, the Law Society of Scotland and the Faculty of Advocates, will host the Major International Conference of the decade in Paisley, the locus delicti, to examine, discuss and celebrate eighty years of the law of tort, negligence and delict.

What was the decision in this most famous case of all time? Why was it so important? How has the law developed since then? What does the future hold? And was it really a snail in the bottle?What was the decision in this most famous case of all time? Why was it so important? How has the law developed since then? What does the future hold? And was it really a snail in the bottle?

The call for papers has been extended to November 1, 2011. Submissions are accepted electronically via the conference website.

- SBS

September 9, 2011 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Journal of Tort Law: Tort and Property

 The second of three issues of the Journal of Tort Law featuring papers presented initially at a 2010 conference on Property and Tort at the U.S.C. Gould School of Law is now available:  http://www.bepress.com/jtl/

The conference was organized by Professors Gregory Keating and Benjamin Zipursky, and sponsored by U.S.C., Fordham, and Harvard Law Schools.   The papers published in this issue are listed below: 

Private Law Theory and Corrective Justice in Trade Secrecy
Eric R. Claeys

Property and Precaution
Lee Anne Fennell

Is Public Nuisance a Tort?
Thomas W. Merrill

Modularity and Morality in the Law of Torts
Henry E. Smith

--CJR

September 7, 2011 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Public Health Law Section Call for Papers

From an e-mail I received from Temple's Scott Burris:

 

PHLR invites submission of abstracts for oral presentation at the PHLR Annual Meeting in New Orleans, January 18-20, 2012. Abstracts should be no more than three pages in length and should focus on public health law research related to communicable diseases, non-communicable diseases, or injury prevention. Visit phlr.org for more information on the Request for Abstracts.

 

--CJR

September 7, 2011 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, September 6, 2011

Southeastern Law Scholars Conference

I am delighted to be involved again organizing the second Southeastern Law Scholars Conference on October 28-29, 2011, at the Charleston School of Law. This regional conference will bring together junior law school faculty to present published papers or works-in-progress across all disciplines within the law. The conference is open to all junior law faculty (one to seven years teaching experience) at law schools in the southeastern United States. To ensure an atmosphere conducive to feedback, space is limited to twenty participants.

The conference will begin with dinner for all participants on Friday, October 28, 2011. On Saturday, October 29, 2011, conference participants will present either a completed paper or work-in-progress, and comment on the papers and ideas presented by others. As the host school, the Charleston School of Law will provide dinner on Friday, October 28, as well as breakfast and lunch on Saturday, October 29. There is no registration fee. Participants, however, are responsible for their own travel expenses.

To participate in the conference, please email me by Friday, September 29, 2011. Please note whether you will be attending dinner on Friday, October 28, in your email. In addition, please include the title of your presentation topic. A short abstract would also be helpful.

- SBS

September 6, 2011 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Conference Announcement: Sixth Biennial Conference on the Law of Obligations: Challenging Orthodoxy

Sixth Biennial Conference on the Law of Obligations: Challenging Orthodoxy

Hosted by The Faculty of Law at the University of Western Ontario

London, Ontario, Canada

July 17-20, 2012

The Faculty of Law at the University of Western Ontario is pleased to be hosting the Sixth Biennial Conference on the Law of Obligations. The conference will bring together leading scholars in tort, contract, equity and unjust enrichment from throughout the common law world.

The theme of the conference is "Challenging Orthodoxy." We have prepared an academic program of over 60 speakers in which professors, graduate students and eminent practitioners will challenge established common law rules and suggest new approaches to both old and emerging problems. The plenary speakers are Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin and Justice Thomas Cromwell (Supreme Court of Canada), Melvin Eisenberg (Berkeley), John Goldberg (Harvard), Andrew Robertson (Melbourne), Ernest Weinrib (Toronto), Richard Wright (Chicago-Kent), and Ben Zipursky (Fordham).

The Obligations Conference originated at the University of Melbourne in 2002, and has since become one of the leading private law conferences in the common law world. The biennial conferences have been held at the University of Melbourne, the University of Queensland, the National University of Singapore and the University of Oxford.

For more information on the Conference and to register please visit: http://www.law.uwo.ca/Conferences/Obligations6/index.html.

September 1, 2011 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, August 26, 2011

Lessons of 9/11 for Mass Torts at Cardozo

Tony Sebok and Myriam Gilles at Cardozo have set up a conference on the 9/11 victim compensation fund and its relevance for mass torts.  The conference is September 12, 2011 at Cardozo and begins at 2:30 p.m.  Kenneth Feinberg is the keynote speaker; other speakers include Sheila Birnbaum, John Goldberg, Marc Moller, Linda Mullenix, Roger Parloff, Bob Rabin, and Judge Jack Weinstein.  The program is here.

--CJR

August 26, 2011 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Abraham on Strict Liability in Negligence

Ken Abraham (Virginia) has posted Strict Liability in Negligence.  The abstract provides:

This Article, written for a Symposium in honor of Robert Rabin, argues that some forms of liability imposed in negligence are more like strict liability than negligence. For example, under the objective standard of negligence, liability may be imposed even when the defendant was not capable of exercising what counts as reasonable care. Similarly, under certain circumstances reasonable care requires perfect compliance with precautionary requirements. Finally, the “thin-skull” rule imposes liability on a defendant who negligently risks harm to a foreseeable plaintiff even if the amount of harm this plaintiff suffers is far in excess of what was foreseeable. In the first example the defendant is liable even if he does his best. In the second example the defendant is liable unless he achieves perfect compliance. And in the third example the defendant is liable for something he could not foresee. Imposing liability for negligence in these situations resembles strict liability. At the least, these forms of negligence liability certainly are “stricter” than many others. The Article examines the rights-based and instrumental roles played by these forms of liability in reflecting norms of responsibility, reducing information and error costs, influencing activity levels, and promoting the insurance of losses.

The analysis has two implications. The first is that negligence is not the pure type of liability that it is sometimes thought to be. The existence within negligence of several forms of liability that are strict, or at least “stricter” than the core negligence paradigm, weakens the claim that negligence liability may have to moral superiority over strict liability. I argue that part of the reason negligence has maintained its dominance of accident law, and part of the reason strict liability has not become more dominant, is that negligence has incorporated stricter liability within it. The second implication of my analysis is that the normative character of tort liability is more complex, and perhaps more ambiguous, than either rights or instrumental theories standing alone can easily capture. One of the most interesting things about the instances of strict liability in negligence is that, whether we call them strict liability or deny them this status, there seems to be widespread agreement that they are normatively attractive. This confluence of support on the merits for doctrines whose status itself is contested suggests that tort law doctrines may need to satisfy both instrumental and rights-based concerns in order to be stable and persistent. A negligence system that purports to condition liability on the commission of wrongs, but also sometimes imposes stricter liability for conduct that is not so clearly blameworthy, would seem to be influenced in practice by the same instrumental considerations that support the imposition of strict liability. Conversely, instrumental justifications for tort doctrines are likely to be unpersuasive when these doctrines do not also satisfy rights-based concerns. Whether or not our system of accident law has mixed “goals,” then, it certainly appears to be subject to mixed side-constraints.

--CJR

 

August 17, 2011 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Gardner on Civil Recourse Theory

John Gardner (Oxford) has posted to SSRN Torts and Other Wrongs, his contribution to the Florida State civil recourse symposium.  The abstract provides:

In this paper, a draft contribution to a symposium on the work of John Goldberg and Ben Zipursky, I take Goldberg and Zipursky to task for failing to distinguish the law of torts adequately from some neighbouring areas of private law. I focus on their equivocation on the question of whether reparative (a.k.a. compensatory) damages have a special place in the law of torts. I suggest that this equivocation is bound up with Goldberg's and Zipursky's wish to maintain what I argue to be an artificial rivalry between their 'civil recourse' explanation of tort law and the 'corrective justice' explanations associated with Weinrib, Coleman, and others. I suggest that 'civil recourse' and 'corrective justice' each capture part of the truth about tort law. I end by addressing briefly some doubts about whether this is a truth worth capturing.

--CJR

August 10, 2011 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, August 5, 2011

Ripstein on Civil Recourse Theory and Corrective Justice

Arthur Ripstein (Toronto) has posted to SSRN Civil Recourse and Separation of Rights and Remedies, his contribution to the Florida State civil recourse symposium.  The abstract provides:

In developing their Civil Recourse theory of tort law, John Goldberg and Benjamin Zipursky seek to separate Civil Recourse from Corrective Justice by showing that tort law does not work in the ways in which corrective justice theory says that it must. The strategy of separation, in turn, rests on a separation between wrongs and remedies, a separation between ideas of risk and ideas of ordinariness, a separation between abstract characterizations of rights and contingent social norms, and, finally, a separation between a wrong done against the plaintiff and her power to exact a remedy. I argue that none of these separations can be made.

--CJR

August 5, 2011 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Sunday, April 3, 2011

Deepwater Horizon Symposium at Roger Williams

Although not strictly a torts conference, Roger Williams is hosting a symposium relating to the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster.  George Conk (Fordham) has the details at Torts Today.  On the torts front, George will be speaking, as will tomorrow's Guest Blogger, Tom Galligan.  Roger Williams's torts-scholar dean, David Logan, will also be present and moderating.

--CJR

April 3, 2011 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)