Monday, August 25, 2014

Two by Solomon on Juries

Jason Solomon has posted two pieces to SSRN.  First is a symposium introduction to The Civil Jury as Political Institution.  The abstract provides:

More than two hundred years after the Seventh Amendment enshrined the civil jury right, the debate over the role of the civil jury in the United States continues unabated. But even as questions about the civil jury’s competence as an adjudicative institution continue, questions surrounding the civil jury’s justification and role as a political institution are under explored.

To explore these questions in contemporary society, the Bill of Rights Institute and Law Review at William & Mary Law School hosted a symposium on The Civil Jury as a Political Institution. For two days in February 2013, scholars from an array of disciplines gathered to consider the extent to which the civil jury played a meaningful role as a political institution historically, whether it still serves that purpose today and, if so, what measures can or should be taken to ensure its continuing significance. 

This short essay is the introduction to the symposium issue of the William & Mary Law Review on this topic. The essay provides a brief summary and exploration of some of the themes that arose in the papers and during the discussion.

Second is Juries, Social Norms, and Civil Justice.  The abstract provides:

At the root of many contemporary debates and landmark cases in the civil justice system are underlying questions about the role of the civil jury. In prior work, I examined the justifications for the civil jury as a political institution, and found them wanting in our contemporary legal system. 

This Article looks closely and critically at the justification for the civil jury as an adjudicative institution and questions the conventional wisdom behind it. The focus is on tort law because the jury has more power to decide questions of law in tort than any other area of law. The Article makes three original contributions.

First, I undermine the claim that the breach question in negligence is inevitably one for the jury by revisiting a famous debate between Cardozo and Holmes about the possibility of judge-made rules around breach in tort. Second, I draw on social and cognitive psychology to question the conventional wisdom that juries applying general standards are ideally suited to identify and apply social norms. And third, I sketch a middle-ground approach on breach, which involves presumptive rules that defer to indicia of social norms such as statutes and regulations, custom, and the market.

In making the argument, this Article begins to point the way towards a tort system that recognizes the value of recourse but better serves rule-of-law values.

August 25, 2014 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, August 7, 2014

Conference Announcement: "New Frontiers for FDA Regulation"

The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School and the Food and Drug Law Institute have announced a joint symposium on "Emerging Issues and New Frontiers for FDA Regulation," to be held on October 20, 2014, in Washington.  Topics include food regulation, drug shortages, stem cells, and synthetic biology.

- SBS

August 7, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Oberdiek on Proximate Cause

John Oberdiek (Rutgers-Camden) has posted to SSRN Putting (and Keeping) Proximate Cause in Its Place.  The abstract provides:

This is a draft contribution to a forthcoming fetschrift in Michael S. Moore's honor, to be published by Oxford University Press.  The chapter takes on an aspect of Moore's important work on causation in law.

Before one can recover for an injury sounding in negligence, one must establish that the defendant more likely than not proximately caused the injury. That the positive law of negligence imposes this requirement is beyond controversy. What is more controversial is whether the requirement is conceptually and morally defensible. Michael Moore, singly as well as in tandem with Heidi Hurd, powerfully argues that it is neither. Specifically, Moore contends that the harm-within-the-risk test of proximate causation, despite its venerable history in tort law and reaffirmation in the latest Restatement, is “incoherent” and “morally undesirable.” It is bad enough, on Moore’s view, that negligence law bifurcates its causal inquiry, distinguishing as it does the question of actual causation from that of proximate causation, rather than pursuing a unified naturalistic inquiry into the substantiality of causal contribution. What is worse is that tort law can’t even get its own misguided causal inquiry half-right.

I do not share Moore’s jaundiced view of the harm-within-the-risk test of proximate cause – what I will call the “risk rule” for short. I begin by questioning his understanding of the risk rule as it figures in tort law, and go on to argue that neither his conceptual nor his moral criticism of the risk rule is decisive. In the course of rebutting Moore’s criticisms, I outline what I take to be the most compelling account of the risk rule in the law of torts. What emerges is a conception of proximate cause that is thoroughly moralized. Of course moral premises must be invoked to defend the risk rule’s moral merit, but, I argue, they must also be invoked to defend its conceptual coherence. In my view, the risk rule is both morally and conceptually sound.
 
Via Solum/LTB.
 
--CJR

July 29, 2014 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Friday, July 25, 2014

Upcoming LEC Workshops for Law Professors

I posted last February about my experience at the George Mason Law & Economic Center Workshop on Risk, Injury, Liability & Insurance.  In a word: fantastic.

If any of the upcoming LEC Workshop topics strike your fancy, my advice is GO! (especially to Duck Key!).  


LEC WORKSHOP FOR LAW PROFESSORS ON AUSTRIAN LAW AND ECONOMICS
Wednesday, October 1 - Friday, October 3, 2014
George Mason University School of Law, Arlington, VA

Confirmed speakers include: Peter J. Boettke (George Mason University), Christopher J. Coyne (George Mason University), Israel Kirzner (New York University), Peter Leeson (George Mason University), Ragan Petrie (George Mason University), Edmund Phelps (2006 Nobel Laureate, Columbia University), Vernon Smith, (2002 Nobel Laureate, Chapman University), Oliver Williamson, (2009 Nobel Laureate, University of California at Berkeley), and Todd J. Zywicki (George Mason University School of Law).

LEC-PERC WORKSHOP FOR LAW PROFESSORS ON ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
Saturday, December 6 - Wednesday, December 10, 2014
Hawks Cay Resort, Duck Key, FL

Confirmed speakers include: Jonathan H. Adler (Case Western Reserve University School of Law), Terry L. Anderson (Property and Environment Research Center), Henry N. Butler (George Mason University School of Law), and Dean Lueck (University of Arizona).

LEC WORKSHOP FOR LAW PROFESSORS ON THE ECONOMICS OF LITIGATION AND CIVIL PROCEDURE
Thursday, January 29 - Sunday, February 1, 2015
Hawks Cay Resort, Duck Key, FL

Confirmed speakers include: Robert G. Bone (University of Texas at Austin School of Law), Jonah B. Gelbach (University of Pennsylvania Law School), and Bruce H. Kobayashi (George Mason University School of Law).

TERMS AND CONDITIONS APPLICABLE TO ALL THREE WORKSHOPS:
1. NO TUITION
2. ATTENDANCE AND PARTICIPATION: Attendees are required to attend all sessions and group meals. Attendees are expected to be prepared and to actively participate in the discussions.
3. HOTEL ROOMS: The LEC makes reservations and pays for rooms via direct bill.
4. MEALS: The LEC provides group meals and breaks for all attendees.
5. TRANSPORTATION: Attendees are responsible for making their own transportation arrangements.
6. DEPOSIT: For each workshop, accepted applicants must make a $500 deposit bonding their attendance within 30 days of acceptance. For each workshop, the deposit is refunded within 30 days after successful completion of the workshop.
7. APPLICATION PROCEDURE: Please use the link below to apply: http://www.cvent.com/Surveys/Welcome.aspx?s=921dfb49-5ceb-44bd-87df-bd63d4acc371
8. ACCEPTANCE: The LEC will begin evaluating applications as they are received.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: For more information regarding these conferences or other initiatives of the Law & Economics Center, please visit: http://www.MasonLEC.org

You may also call or send an email to Jeff Smith, Coordinator, Henry G. Manne Program in Law & Economics Studies, at 703.993.8382 or jsmithQ@gmu.edu

July 25, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, July 21, 2014

Causation, Liability and Apportionment Law, Economics and Philosophy

The conference Causation, Liability and Apportionment: an Interdisciplinary Perspective: Law, Economics and Philosophy is organized by the BETA (Bureau of Theoretical and Applied Economics, University of Lorraine and UDS, CNRS). The conference is supported by the French National Agency for Scientific Research (ANR, DAMAGE  program 2012-­‐2015), the French Civil Law Supreme Court (Cour de cassation), the University of Paris 2 (Paris Center for Law and Economics) and the François Geny Institute (University of Lorraine).
 
Practical information
The conference is held at the Cour de cassation (Grand’chambre) on Friday, Sept 12 and at the University of Paris 2 (Salle des conseils) on Saturday, sept 13. No registration fees but, for safety reasons, registration is required. Proceed to registration by sending an email to Cécile Dumaux-­‐Fardet (cecile.dumaux-­‐fardet@univ-­‐lorraine.fr) before august 18 or directly to the Cour de cassation after august 18 (Télécopie 01.44.32.78.28; Internet www.courdecassation.fr.)
 
Talks will be delivered in English.
 
Organization and Contacts
For any further information, please contact the organizers of the conference: Samuel Ferey (Samuel.Ferey@univ-­‐lorraine.fr) or Florence G’sell (flogsell@gmail.com).
 
Thanks to Richard Wright for the tip.
 
--CJR

July 21, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

The Evolution of Asbestos Litigation at Tulane

The Tulane Law Review recently hosted "The Evolution of Asbestos Litigation:  Enduring Issues and the Administration of Trusts."  The articles are now available:

Edward F. Sherman, The Evolution of Asbestos Litigation, 88 Tul. L. Rev. 1021 (2014).

Georgene Vairo, Lessons Learned By the Reporter:  Is Disaggregation the Answer to the Asbestos Mess?, 88 Tul. L. Rev. 1039 (2014).

Lester Brickman, Fraud and Abuse in Mesothelioma Litigation, 88 Tul. L. Rev. 1071 (2014).

Joseph Sanders, The “Every Exposure” Cases and the Beginning of the Asbestos Endgame, 88 Tul. L. Rev. 1153 (2014).

Peggy L. Ableman, A Case Study From a Judicial Perspective:  How Fairness and Integrity in Asbestos Tort Litigation Can Be Undermined by Lack of Access to Bankruptcy Trust Claims, 88 Tul. L. Rev. 1185 (2014).

Anita Bernstein, Gender in Asbestos Law: Cui Bono? Cui Pacat?, 88 Tul. L. Rev. 11211 (2014).

--CJR

July 1, 2014 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Articles from Perspectives on Mass Tort Litigation, Part II

The second set of articles from the April 2013 symposium at Widener, Perspectives on Mass Tort Litigation, are now available.

Christopher J. Robinette, Introduction, Part II Download Robinette Intro 2 - Ready for Pub. 6.21.14

Aaron Twerski & Lior Sapir, Sufficiency of the Evidence Does Not Meet the Daubert Standards:  A Critique of the Green-Sanders Proposal Download Twerski - Ready for Pub. 6.17.14

Michael D. Green & Joseph Sanders, In Defense of Sufficiency:  A Reply to Professor Twerski and Mr. Sapir Download Green - Ready for Pub. 6.18.14

William P. Shelley, Jacob C. Cohn & Joseph A. Arnold, Further Transparency Between the Tort System and Section 524(g) Asbestos Trusts, 2014 Update  Download Shelley - Ready for Pub. 6.19.2014 

Bruce Mattock, Andrew Sackett & Jason Shipp, Clearing Up the False Premises Underlying the Push for Asbestos Bankruptcy Trust "Transparency" Download Mattock - Ready for Pub. 6.18.14

Scott B. Cooper & Lara Antonuk, The Royal Nonesuch:  How Tort Reformers Are Pulling One Over on Pennsylvania Download Cooper & Antonuk - Ready for Pub. 6.18.14

Congratulations to the Widener Law Journal for two great issues.

--CJR

July 1, 2014 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Principles of Liability Insurance Conference

at Rutgers-Camden; details here:   Download Call for Papers.

--CJR

June 25, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Wright Comments on R3 Intentional Torts

The discussion draft of the Restatement Third, Torts: Intentional Torts to Persons, was discussed this morning at the American Law Institute annual meeting.  

Richard W. Wright (IIT Chicago-Kent) submitted the following comments on the draft:  Download ALI Intentional Torts RWW comments

- SBS

May 20, 2014 in Conferences, Current Affairs, TortsProfs | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, April 28, 2014

BP Oil Spill Symposium at Stanford

The Stanford Journal of Complex Litigation is hosting a symposium, "A Complicated Cleanup: The BP Oil Spill Litigation," on Thursday, May 8, 2014 and Friday, May 9, 2014, at Stanford Law School.  The keynote address speaker is Kenneth Feinberg, the Gulf Coast Claims Administrator.  Other symposium speakers will include Elizabeth Cabraser of Lieff Cabraser, Francis McGovern (Duke), Linda Mullenix (Texas), Maya Steinitz (Iowa), and Byron Stier (Southwestern).  Panel moderators will include Stanford Law Professors Nora Engstrom, Deborah Hensler, and Janet Alexander. 

(Via Mass Tort Lit Blog)

--CJR

April 28, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, April 24, 2014

JTL: Special Issue Honoring Richard Nagareda

"The Public Life of Private Law:  A Volume in Honor of Richard Nagareda" is available here.

--CJR

April 24, 2014 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, April 3, 2014

2014 Clifford Symposium on Judge Weinstein

The topic of the 20th Annual Clifford Symposium on Tort Law and Social Policy at DePaul Law is "Judge Jack Weinstein's Impact on Civil Justice in America."  The symposium is Friday, April 24th.  As usual, there is a great lineup of speakers, including a videotape presentation by Justice Stephen Breyer.  You can register online at http://law.depaul.edu/clifford  or call  (312) 362-5292.


 Judge Jack Weinstein has led a remarkable life.  He is the American dream personified; born in the heartland in Wichita, Kansas, raised in Brooklyn, a child who had to make his way in the Depression, a student who secured his first college degree in night school, a veteran of World War II.  He has been a dock worker, a naval officer, a county attorney, a law professor and a federal judge.  At the 20th annual Clifford Symposium, we gather to honor him.  He has opened new vistas in the law of procedure, torts and evidence to name but three.  More than that, he has set a towering example of judicial independence and social conscience.  His work on Agent Orange and numerous mass torts that followed set American courts on a path that has expanded protection for defenseless victims and yielded a better society.  To borrow from one of his lines, “every day [he has laid] down his professional life for justice.”  It does us great honor to have this opportunity to celebrate his life and achievements.

--CJR

April 3, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, March 17, 2014

Mass and Class Claims in Arbitration

From Stacie Strong (Missouri):

On April 9, the 11th Annual ITA-ASIL Conference: Mass and Class Claims in Arbitration will be presented from 12:00 noon – 4:30 p.m. in Washington D.C. at the Ronald Reagan International Trade Center.

The conference examines the competing trends and future prospects for class and mass claims in litigation and arbitration and features a keynote address by Carolyn B. Lamm (White & Case LLP, Washington, D.C.), past President of the ABA and lead advocate for the 60,000 Italian claimants in Abaclat v. Argentine Republic.

Other participants include co-chairs Christopher Drahozal (University of Kansas School of Law) and S. I. Strong (University of Missouri School of Law) and a stellar faculty including Deepak Gupta (Gupta Beck PLLC, Washington, D.C.) and Geneviève Saumier (McGill University Faculty of Law, Montreal), who will discuss class arbitration in a domestic and comparative context, and Michael Waibel (University of Cambridge, Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, Cambridge) and Samuel Wordsworth, Q.C.(Essex Court Chambers, London), who will discuss mass claims.  Registration includes the networking luncheon which precedes the conference this year.

Click here for the brochure and here to register online.

- SBS

March 17, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

The Jury Trial is Dying: Should We Mourn its Demise? at NYU

Wednesday, April 9, 12:25-1:50 p.m.

Vanderbilt Hall, Greenberg Lounge

Hosted by the Center on Civil Justice With additional support from the American Constitution Society and the Federalist Society

Jury trials in civil cases are part of our Bill of Rights, and the jury trial has always been thought of as a pillar of American democracy. In practice, however, it is increasingly rare. Why is this happening? What does the demise of the jury trial mean for our civil justice system? Does it change democratic citizenship? Can the trend be reversed? Should we try, or just allow the jury trial become a relic of an earlier time?  Our distinguished panel of trial and appellate lawyers and academic experts will discuss these and other hotly debated questions.

CLE Approval Pending 

 

PANELISTS: Mark Behrens, Partner, Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP Renée Lettow Lerner, Associate Professor of Law, The George Washington University Law School, Andrew Pincus, Partner, Mayer Brown Stephen Susman, Partner, Susman Godfrey

MODERATOR:

Arthur R. Miller, University Professor, NYU School of Law

--CJR

March 12, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Neuroscience and Law: Injury, Capacity and Illness

The Hall Center for Law and Health and the Indiana Health Law Review have announced their annual symposium, Neuroscience and Law: Injury, Capacity and Illness, which will be held on March 28, 2014, in Indianapolis.

- SBS

March 11, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, March 10, 2014

Litigation Financing and Mass Torts

In "Would Litigation Financing Improve Mass Torts," the National Law Journal examines an article by Professor Byron Stier suggesting that plaintiffs should be allowed to sell their claims to financial entities.   As Chris mentioned in an earlier post, Byron's article was part of the "Perspectives on Mass Tort Litgiation" symposium held at Widener last April. 

- SBS

March 10, 2014 in Conferences, Current Affairs, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, February 24, 2014

Moral Values and Private Law Conference

The Dickson Poon School of Law, King's College London, is pleased to announce the third Moral Values and Private Law conference, which will take place June 12-13, 2014, in London.
 
The conference will be held in the Moot Court Room in the East Wing of Somerset House, 9.30am-5pm on June 12 and 10am - 2pm on June 13.
 
As in previous years, the conference aims to address questions at the intersection of moral and legal philosophy and private law.
 
The confirmed speakers include: 
 
Steve Hedley (Cork)
John Goldberg (Harvard)
Benjamin Zipursky (Fordham)
James Goudkamp (Oxford)
Michele Graziadei (Torino)
Niamh Connolly (TCD)
Emmanuel Voyiakis (LSE)
John Oberdiek (Rutgers)
Rachael Walsh (TCD)
Victor Tadros (Warwick)
 
The fee to attend both days of the conference, which includes lunch and refreshments on both days, is £100. There is a reduced fee for students of £50. The fee to attend only one day of the conference is £40. 
 
The conference is being organised by Dr Irit Samet and Dr Sandy Steel. Please contact sandy.steel@kcl.ac.uk if you would like to attend. 
 
- SBS

February 24, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Thursday, February 20, 2014

George Mason LEC Workshop on Risk, Injury, Liability & Insurance

Have you heard of the Law & Economics Center Workshops for Law Professors?  These four-day workshops are held throughout the year, throughout the country (with an emphasis on great locales to visit, such as the Florida Keys; Steamboat Springs, CO; and Palo Alto, CA), and are designed to foster a better understanding of law & economics. 

I recently attended the LEC Workshop on Risk, Injury, Liability & Insurance held January 30th to February 2nd at Hawks Cay Resort on Duck Key in Florida. Lodging and most meals were covered by the LEC.  Many of the participants were alumni of other LEC workshops and thus knowledgeable about basic law and economics principles, though a handful (including myself) had only engaged peripherally in the topic.   Faculty presenters were Henry Butler, Executive Director of the LEC; Jonathan Klick (Penn), and Eric Helland (Claremont McKenna).   

Broadly speaking, the goal of these workshops is to introduce the participants to law and economics thinking on the particular topic.   Our workshop focused on the economics of uncertainty and risk, and how that translated to legal concepts in insurance and tort law.  Despite the variety in background knowledge levels among participants, the teaching was very accessible and at the same time sophisticated and engaging.   Discussions focused on problems of adverse selection, moral hazard, and external costs.  I definitely gained a better understanding of the economics of risk, and I benefited tremendously from both the assigned readings (voluminous but thoughtfully selected), and instruction. 

The Law & Economics Center deserves its outstanding reputation.  I highly recommend the LEC Workshops to anyone with a passing interest in law and economics. 

- SBS

February 20, 2014 in Conferences | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)

Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Articles from Perspectives on Mass Tort Litigation

Last April at Widener, we hosted a symposium entitled "Perspectives on Mass Tort Litigation."  The first of two issues of articles from the Widener Law Journal is now available.  It's a terrific lineup:

Christopher J. Robinette, Introduction Download Robinette_V23I1

Victor E. Schwartz & Mark A. Behrens, Asbestos Litigation:  The "Endless Search for a Solvent Bystander" Download Behrens&Schwartz_V23I1

Eduardo C. Robreno, The Federal Asbestos Products Liability Multidistrict Litigation (MDL-875):  Black Hole or New Paradigm? Download Robreno_V23I1

Byron G. Stier, The Sale and Settlement of Mass Tort Claims:  Alternative Litigation Finance and a Possible Future of Mass Tort Resolution Download Stier_V23I1

Thurbert Baker, Paying to Play:  Inside the Ethics and Implications of Third-Party Litigation Financing Download Baker_V23I1

Sheila B. Scheuerman, Mass Tort Ethics:  What Can We Learn from the Case Against Stanley Chesley? Download Scheuerman_V23I1

Nicholas P. Vari & Michael J. Ross, In a League of Its Own:  Restoring Pennsylvania Product Liability Law to the Prevailing Modern "Attitude" of Tort Law Download Vari&Ross_V23I1

S. Todd Brown, Bankruptcy Trusts, Transparency, and the Future of Asbestos Compensation Download Brown_V23I1

--CJR

February 18, 2014 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, February 10, 2014

2014 Society of Legal Scholars Call for Torts Papers

From James Lee (Birmingham):

I write to invite proposals for papers for the Torts subject section meeting of the 2014 Society of Legal Scholars Annual Conference. This year's conference will take place from Tuesday 9th to Friday 12th September 2014 at the University of Nottingham, with Professor Stephen Bailey as President.Torts subject section meeting of the 2014 Society of Legal Scholars Annual Conference. This year's conference will take place from Tuesday 9th to Friday 12th September 2014 at the University of Nottingham, with Professor Stephen Bailey as President.

The overall theme of the Conference is ‘Judging in the 21st Century’. I anticipate that it will be likely that Tort papers will be able to engage readily with this topic, whether focusing on decisions of the highest courts in relevant jurisdictions or on work at first instance, for example. Beyond the theme, proposals on any aspect of the law of tort would be very welcome. The Torts section will take place in the second half of the Conference: please note that it has changed from the first half last year, so will run on Thursday 11th and Friday 12th.

All members of the section, whether research students, early career academics or more senior colleagues are invited to offer papers. We are pleased to have had a range of colleagues presenting high quality papers in recent years, notably from many ODGers. If you are interested in presenting a paper, please e-mail me at j.s.f.lee@bham.ac.uk with a title and a brief abstract. I am happy to discuss any potential submissions informally. Please also tell me if you are proposing a paper for another section, so that I can coordinate arrangements with my fellow convenors. The deadline for proposals is 12pm UK time on Friday 7th March 2014.

Proposers will be informed of the outcome as soon as possible after the deadline. All those who have papers accepted will be required to post a final abstract to the conference paperbank by the end of July.

Convenors have been asked to make it clear to all potential speakers and poster presenters that all speakers, presenters and delegates (and convenors) are required to book and to pay to attend the conference. Booking information will be circulated later in the year.

 

- SBS

February 10, 2014 in Conferences, Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)