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Tuesday, March 16, 2010

Lahav on "Rough Justice and the Problem of Value in Tort Law"

Alexandra Lahav (UConn/ Visiting Fordham) has posted "Rough Justice and the Problem of Value in Tort Law" on SSRN.  The abstract provides:

This Essay argues the counterintuitive position that in our tort system, individual justice is rougher than justice on a mass scale. The reason for this is that mass tort cases can be resolved collectively using rigorous transparent social science methods that can ensure equal treatment of similarly situated litigants. Individual justice, by contrast, allows cases to be resolved in a largely hidden system of comparative valuation using loose methods that are unlikely to result in like cases being treated alike. To do justice courts must use rigorous, transparent methods of case valuation.

In addition to this key insight, this Essay makes two contributions. First, it demonstrates a pragmatic way of thinking about procedural justice by measuring existing procedures against widely recognized principles. In this case, I compare sampling procedures with principles of equality, fairness and distributive justice. Second, it uncovers a pernicious assumption that has been heretofore ignored by scholars: contrary to popular belief, there is no objective way to monetize injuries. All justice in tort cases is rough justice. This is the problem of value in tort law. The solution to this problem is properly administered sampling procedures.

- SBS

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/tortsprof/2010/03/lahav-on-rough-justice-and-the-problem-of-value-in-tort-law.html

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