TortsProf Blog

Editor: Christopher J. Robinette
Widener Univ. School of Law

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Thursday, October 4, 2007

Lead Everywhere

Just to give you a sense of how recalls are going these days, I thought I'd note the introductory parts of today's CPSC recall e-mail newsletter.  I've been getting this newsletter since I started editing the blog, and typically it has had one or two recalls.  Today, well, it's more:

1.  KB Toys Recalls Wooden Toys Due to Violation of Lead Paint Standard

2.  Kids II Recalls Baby Einstein Color Blocks Due to Violation of Lead Paint Standard

3.  Eveready Battery Co. Recalls Toy Flashlights Due to Violation of Lead Paint Standard

4.  Dollar General Recalls Tumblers Due to Violation of Lead Paint Standard

5.  CKI Recalls Children's Decorating Sets Due to Violation of Lead Paint Standard; Sold Exclusively at Toys "R" Us

6.  Key Chains Recalled by Dollar General Due to Risk of Lead Exposure

7.  Antioch Publishing Recalls Bookmarks and Journals Due to Violation of Lead Paint Standard [Ed. note: Bookmarks and journals have paint?]

8.  Sports Authority Recalls Aluminum Water Bottles Due to Violation of Lead Paint Standard

--BC

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Comments

Excessive lead in the blood is a very, very serious issue.

A lot of attention has been placed on lead-based paint in pre-1960 "multiple dwellings" and post-1960 to pre-1978 "buildings where the owners know there is lead-based paint". Not much has been done to prevent lead from entering the homes of millions of children through toys and other gadgets that are excessively contaminated.

It is obviously much easier for children to get lead in their blood stream from playing with lead proned toys, than from living in a lead contaminated home. Nonetheless, rigid testing guidelines need to be put in place, and I think the time is NOW.

Posted by: Memn | Nov 2, 2007 11:53:48 AM

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