Monday, July 18, 2016

Why the Male Pill Still Doesn't Exist

The Atlantic (July 13, 2016): Why the Male Pill Still Doesn't Exist, by Andy Extance 

While America was introduced to the female birth control pill, and the first tests in hopes of creating a pill for men were conducted as early as 1957, many lament the fact that a male 'pill' equivalent to that of female hormonal contraception still does not exist. There are a variety of issues that have delayed the development of a male pill  - there is a lack of commitment to contraception; pharmaceutical companies are less interested in making a product for men; and dangerous side effects documented from previous drug trials. But studies show that the interest, across gender identities, for a male pill is there. The article highlights the social acceptance of women bearing the responsibility of taking contraception, and researchers' worry that they may not be able to create a product that would be as easy as to administer as the female pill. Over the years, researchers have explored various hormonal and non-hormonal methods.  One of the researches believes that the answer is probably out there and the work just needs to be completed: 

 [Elaine] Lissner is adamant that the ideas that seem to have faltered are not dead, they’re just resting. “We keep collecting new methods and never finish the ones we have,” she fumes. “Pick one and make  something! Finish the job!”

 

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/reproductive_rights/2016/07/why-the-male-pill-still-doesnt-exist.html

Contraception, Fertility, Medical News | Permalink

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