Reproductive Rights Prof Blog

Editor: Caitlin E. Borgmann
CUNY School of Law

A Member of the Law Professor Blogs Network

Monday, March 19, 2007

John McCain on Abortion

The AP/Boston Herald reported yesterday:

Republican presidential hopeful John McCain did some grass-roots campaigning in a grand setting Sunday, attending a house party at a mansion built for one of his predecessors in the U.S. Senate....

A question about abortion provided an opportunity for McCain to separate himself from other Republicans seeking the nomination.

    ”I am a pro-life person. That’s been a solid 24-year record,” he said. ”I have not changed my position.”

    ”I have been an advocate for human rights -- having been deprived of them for a period in my life -- from Burma to Bosnia to China to Cuba, and I believe human rights also extend to that of the unborn,” said McCain, who endured years of torture and deprivation as a prisoner of war in North Vietnam.

Read McCain emphasizes anti-abortion stance at mansion party.  Here are some quotations that further illustrate Senator John McCain's (evolving?) views on abortion (via OnTheIssues.org):

On “Meet the Press,” McCain said he had “come to the conclusion that the exceptions for rape, incest, and the life of the mother are legitimate exceptions” to an outright ban on abortions. “I don’t claim to be a theologian, but I have my moral beliefs.” If Roe v. Wade is overturned and abortion outlawed, McCain said he believes doctors who performed abortions would be prosecuted. “But I would not prosecute a woman” who obtained an abortion. Source: Boston Globe, p. A9 Jan 31, 2000

McCain was asked whether he would reinstate the Reagan era rule that prevents international family planning clinics that receive federal funds from discussing abortion. “I don’t believe they should advocate abortion with my tax dollars,” McCain said, adding that he opposed abortion except in cases of rape and incest. He was then asked how he would determine whether someone had in fact been raped. McCain responded, “I think that I would give the benefit of the doubt to the person who alleges that.” Source: New York Times, p. A17 Jan 25, 2000

McCain was asked how he could be anti-abortion and still vote to support fetal tissue research. He supports fetal-tissue research, McCain said, because it has helped make progress against Parkinson’s disease. McCain concluded that abortion rights and anti-abortion activists should cooperate on issues of foster care and adoption. He had made his decision on abortion, he said, “after a lot of study, consultation, and a lot of prayer.” He added, “I’d like to have less intensity on this issue.” Source: Boston Globe, p. A11 Jan 22, 2000

McCain said, “I’d love to see a point where Roe vs. Wade is irrelevant, and could be repealed because abortion is no longer necessary. But certainly in the short term, or even the long term, I would not support repeal of Roe vs. Wade, which would then force women in America to [undergo] illegal and dangerous operations.” A spokesman said that McCain “has a 17-year voting record of supporting efforts to overturn Roe vs. Wade. He does that currently, and will continue to do that as president.” Source: Ron Fournier, Associated Press Aug 24, 1999

McCain apparently has changed his mind about whether Roe should be overturned and has since asserted that it should be, although he denies flip-flopping on the issue.  See related post: McCain on Roe v. Wade; Romney on Embryonic Stem Cell Research.

For other posts on the 2008 presidential candidates, see 2008 Presidential Campaign in the Topical Archive of this blog.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/reproductive_rights/2007/03/mccain_on_abort.html

2008 Presidential Campaign, Abortion, Stem Cell Research | Permalink

TrackBack URL for this entry:

http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d8341bfae553ef00d83576502069e2

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference John McCain on Abortion:

Comments

John McCain doesn't believe in a woman's right to choose I can only assume he would not allow the mentally impaired, mentally ill, or 11 year old girl from changing their circumstance if pregnant. The question of conscience and morality should be determined by the person whom it affects. If there was a way to separate my tax dollars from John McCain's I would want every option discussed before committing to a life long responsibility. Getting pregnant is not always by choice - who pays the price of an unplanned child?

Posted by: C. Willis | Jul 23, 2007 11:53:30 PM

first of all does McCain not realize that passing a law making abortion illigal would only make the problem worse.people who really hadnt planned to have a child and really do not want a child should have the right to terminate when they choose to do so. If you think about it, not having the choice would therefor force people into a state of bodily harm. they would try to use home methods (the wire hanger, falling down the stairs ect.) there would be more deaths in the world if there werent abortion than if there was. Another thing is that Not every one is a catholic. i for one believe there is no god no heaven nothing! it is a scam. its a made up belief so people can turn to religion instead of facing reality! i for one believe that we should not appoint some one into office if they are super religous. its rediculous!! and will cause chaos of we go on law based on what the bible says is right/wrong. The bible is WRONG! its fake!!!

Posted by: sam | Oct 8, 2008 8:18:57 AM

Post a comment