PropertyProf Blog

Editor: Stephen Clowney
Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville

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Wednesday, July 9, 2008

Salkin on Land Use and Natural Disaster Mitigation

Patricial Salkin (Albany) has posted Sustainability at the Edge: The Opportunity and Responsibility of Local Governments to Most Effectively Plan for Natural Disaster Mitigation on SSRN.  Here's the abstract:

The traditional link between disaster mitigation and local land use planning was highlighted by the Disaster Mitigation Act (DMA) of 2000, which emphasizes the need for mitigation coordination among state and local entities. This article looks at the role of local governments in natural disaster mitigation, specifically, how local governments may use traditional land use powers, such as the police power, to protect against disasters. The paper cites DMA provisions that offer financial incentives to states that work with local governments to plan for growth and disasters; and sets forth case studies to illustrate how states can create vertical links among federal,state, and local entities to coordinate disaster mitigation strategies.

Ben Barros

[Comments are held for approval, so there will be some delay in posting]

July 9, 2008 in Land Use, Recent Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

Monday, July 7, 2008

Alexander on Public Housing Reform in Chicago

Lisa A. Alexander (Wisconsin) has posted A Sociolegal History of Public Housing Reform in Chicago on SSRN.  Here's the abstract:

This essay summarizes and compares Alexander Polikoff's Waiting for Gautreaux: A Story of Segregation, Housing, and the Black Ghetto and Mary Pattillo's Black on the Block: The Politics of Race and Class in the City to convey the contributions and limitations of each book. Both works provide a rich sociolegal history of public housing reform in Chicago and illustrate the challenges Chicago has faced in implementing recent HOPE VI public housing reforms. I compare Polikoff's forty-year battle to desegregate public housing in Chicago with Pattillo's insightful observations of class dynamics between the new middle-class African-American power brokers of housing reform and public housing residents. Through this comparison, I seek to show that Polikoff's long-term prescriptions for public housing reform are based upon a conception of the inner city that may no longer be entirely accurate. This comparison also conveys the social complexity inherent in HOPE VI reform efforts, a complexity often overlooked in the prevailing policy and academic debates.

Ben Barros

[Comments are held for approval, so there will be some delay in posting]

July 7, 2008 in Recent Scholarship | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack (0)